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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Memo to candidates for governor: It's not a good idea to hire an actor for your TV commercial who once played "Mr. Cannibal" in a torture flick. Democrat Tom Wolf's campaign learned that lesson Monday as the website BuzzFeed reported the other role of lawyer and actor Alan Benyak - and Republicans blasted what they called an offensive error in judgment. "We were unaware of Mr. Benyak's involvement in the film," Wolf spokesman Mark Nicastre said Monday night. He said the campaign was sending a substitute ad - with Benyak edited out - to TV stations.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After Red Mascara, 92, wrote "I'm From New Jersey" in 1960, he started campaigning for it to become the official state song. After 54 years, the effort "needs a spark," says Red, who was born Joseph Rocco Mascari in Phillipsburg, Warren County, where he still lives. "Maybe this is the spark. " "This" is an almost-finished documentary by Daniel Goodman. His film also is called I'm From New Jersey , and its hero is a gentlemanly, self-taught tunesmith who refuses to give up. I'm from New Jersey / and I'm proud about it / I love the Garden State "I realized that his song really is all about what I was trying to talk about in my film," says Goodman, 30, who's raised $48,000 for the project through the Kickstarter online funding platform.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
If a cinema orgy promising more than 100 films from 28 countries in 11 days can ever seem manageable, the 23d Philadelphia Film Festival does it. It's not remotely possible to catch everything in the ambitious program, which began Thursday night with the gala premiere of Birdman and ends Oct. 26 with more than a dozen titles spread across four venues. But the selection and scheduling of films - from awards-season candidates to homegrown docs, from musicals to new masterworks - makes sense, somehow.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE 23RD PHILADELPHIA Film Festival ramps up today with an assortment of Hollywood sneak peaks and buzzed-about indies and foreign titles. The festival officially commenced yesterday with opening day screenings of Bill Murray's "St Vincent" and also "Birdman," the latter featuring Michael Keaton's sensational and sure-to-be Oscar-nominated performance as an aging Hollywood star mounting a Broadway comeback. The festival concludes Oct. 26 with a closing night screening of another likely Oscar contender, "Wild," featuring Reese Witherspoon in an adaptation of Cheryl Strayed's best-seller about a thousand-mile hike on the Pacific Crest Trail.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
M O'NE DAVIS ' biggest fan? Spike Lee . "Do the Right Thing" and "Malcolm X" director Lee was in Philly this weekend, hanging out with the Taney Dragons phenom and the rest of the team. Why? I hear it's because he's making a documentary about the Philly ballers who made it to the semifinals of the Little League World Series this year, capturing the hearts of our fickle town. A tipster told me that a film crew was spotted shooting at Marian Anderson Rec Center, at 18th and Fitzwater streets.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'I know, I know, I can't come up with anything new," David Fincher said with a mock sigh, responding to the observation that with Gone Girl , the twice Oscar-nominated director has tackled yet another mega-bestselling book. His take on Stieg Larsson's The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo , steeped in murder, mystery, and Swedish meatballs, opened in 2011. On Friday, Fincher's hugely anticipated adaptation of Gillian Flynn's 2012 novel - 94 weeks at or near the top of the combined print and e-book lists - opens everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's always refreshing to be reminded that beyond James Bond, Jason Bourne, and Jack Ryan there lies an entire world of espionage dramas that are as intelligent as they are exciting. This year's greatest find is Bethlehem , a rich, multilayered character study about a young Israeli spymaster (Tsahi Halevi) who recruits the teenage brother (Shadi Mar'i) of a Palestinian militant wanted for launching numerous violent attacks against Israeli targets. Cowritten by Israeli intelligence officer-turned director Yuval Adler and Palestinian author Ali Waked, and directed by Adler, Bethlehem is an amazing chronicle of the strange, intimate relationship that develops between handler and agent.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For any indie filmmaker in these parlous times, loving a challenge is an almost requisite trait. Financing production, marketing the movie, finding distribution avenues - all onerous steps in an often-lonely process. But Rob Williams, like a growing number of auteurs who work in LGBTQ leitmotifs, sees a potentially significant audience at the end of the struggle. "There's vastly increased viewership and demand for gay-themed films in our community," says the Los Angeles-based director/writer.
SPORTS
September 19, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Position-by-position grades for the Eagles after their 30-27 win over the Colts on Monday, spotlighting one player at each spot. OFFENSE: B   Quarterback: C+ Nick Foles had an OK outing Monday and, most important, came home with a win. There were missed receivers again, but he cut down on the turnovers and made some nice throws and reads. His numbers were slightly skewed by the large amount of successful screen passes. Foles hit Zach Ertz for 27 yards on the first drive.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are three of the most important individuals in American history. All had the last name Roosevelt, and all were beset by personal demons that threatened to cut them down. Theodore, Franklin Delano, and Eleanor Roosevelt helped define the American century, said Ken Burns, creator and director of PBS's epic 14-hour documentary, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History . Divided into seven two-hour episodes, it will air on consecutive nights beginning Sunday at 8 p.m. on PBS (locally on WHYY-TV12)
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Memo to candidates for governor: It's not a good idea to hire an actor for your TV commercial who once played "Mr. Cannibal" in a torture flick. Democrat Tom Wolf's campaign learned that lesson Monday as the website BuzzFeed reported the other role of lawyer and actor Alan Benyak - and Republicans blasted what they called an offensive error in judgment. "We were unaware of Mr. Benyak's involvement in the film," Wolf spokesman Mark Nicastre said Monday night. He said the campaign was sending a substitute ad - with Benyak edited out - to TV stations.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE'S A MOMENT in "The Fisher King" when Robin Williams' character, homeless and unhinged by the death of his wife, gets close to something happy. And then a fire-wielding red knight appears on horseback, the embodiment of all his anguish, forcing him back toward the darkness of his own depression. It seems so much more than just a scene in a movie now, in light of the gifted actor's suicide last month. On Tuesday night, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the Philadelphia Film Society, the movie website eflixir.com and Minding Your Mind, a Philadelphia mental-health awareness group, will present the 1991 film at the Perelman Theater in the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts as part of National Suicide Prevention Week.
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