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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
NEW YORK - The inevitable moment of confrontation was upon them. How could any operatic adaptation of The Shining eradicate memories of those iconic Stanley Kubrick film moments when Jack Nicholson is breaking down the door to kill his terrified wife and psychic son? The question was posed somewhat pointedly on Tuesday at the National Opera America Center, when the Minnesota Opera presented a media preview of one of the most curiously awaited operas in years - The Shining - with premiere performances in Minneapolis on May 7 to 15. The answer was simple: The opera is based not on the 1980 film, but on Stephen King's 1977 novel.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
For 45 years, Paul Sheriff didn't talk about his childhood. "Compartmentalizing things made it easier to move forward," said Sheriff, 60, a professor of graphic design at Temple University's Tyler School of Art. "I didn't want sympathy. I didn't want pity. I thought those were bad emotions, but I'm learning they're not. " Then, seven years ago, Sheriff had earned a sabbatical, a time of contemplation, and he decided he needed to face the disaster that changed the trajectory of his life at the young age of 10. In June 1966, Sheriff's parents and his 14-year-old sister were killed in a small-plane crash.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
There is a certain awkwardness about Uber. With a taxi or a bus, there's a professional divide that allows passengers to disassociate and pretend the person at the wheel is apart from them. With Uber, the driver could just as easily be on the stool next to you at a bar as behind the wheel of the car. He could be sucked into your life, or you into his. Matthew Cherry's new movie 9 Rides , which plays Sunday at the final day of the BlackStar Film Festival, chronicles a night in the life of one Uber driver.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
FILM DIRECTOR Tina Morton says 80-year-old Adeline Behlin remembers when her family fled South Carolina for Philadelphia. "Her grandfather had been beaten by a mob for trying to organize black people to vote," Morton said. "He had worked on the railroad and when they beat him, they left him on the railroad tracks. He felt the vibration of a train coming and had just enough strength to crawl off the tracks. A neighbor found him. And the family fled the next day. " Morton recounts Behlin's story in "When We Came Up Here," one of several short films about people finding new lives in Philadelphia that will be shown Saturday at International House in West Philadelphia as part of a project called the Great Migration: A City Transformed.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Steven Rea, MOVIE CRITIC
IT'S HARD NOT to think of Breaking Bad while watching The Infiltrator . And not just because Bryan Cranston stars in both - as Walter White, the chemistry teacher-turned-mad-meth-king in the groundbreaking series, of course, and as Robert Mazur, an undercover G-man who burrows deeply, dirtily, into the world of drug cartels and international money-laundering in Brad Furman's true-crime pic. Cranston was iconic, a walking tornado of moral crisis,...
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
S TAR TREK helmsman Hikaru Sulu is going to be gay. And the original Sulu, George Takei , who is gay, isn't happy about it. "I'm delighted that there's a gay character," Takei told The Hollywood Reporter. "Unfortunately, it's a twisting of Gene [ Roddenberry ]'s creation, to which he put in so much thought. I think it's really unfortunate. " Takei said Roddenberry was very supportive of the LGBT movement, but envisioned Sulu as heterosexual. But not an active heterosexual like Captain Kirk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
There are entire horror movies that aren't as unnerving as the opening credits to John Carpenter's Halloween . What's so eerie, and sets the tone for a film that has become a revered horror classic and spawned too many better-left-unmentioned sequels, isn't the slow zoom into the firelit face of a menacingly grinning jack-o'-lantern. It's the insistent, jittery score, a simple piano melody repeating over a menacing drone. Like the film itself, that memorable music is the work of John Carpenter, who composed the scores for many of his own films.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Spotting a Hollywood megastar on set anywhere in Southeastern Pennsylvania this year will take more than a telephoto lens or a lucky break. Because for the first time in a good decade, no major feature films are slotted to be shot in or around the nation's fifth-largest city this year. The grim milestone has film boosters on edge in a region once adept at luring big-money producers to its cobblestone alleys and tree-lined suburbs. Pennsylvania's film tax credit is no longer working the same big-screen magic here.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Can you make a film that criticizes gun violence in America while also reveling in a relentless, gory orgy of gun violence, knife violence, chain-saw violence, and ax violence? That's the plight of the Purge franchise, an auteurish series of hyper-violent, dystopian thrillers from writer-director James DeMonaco ( The Negotiator , Skinwalkers ) now in its third installment with The Purge: Election Year . The premise and the basic story line are familiar: Set in the near future, the Purge movies concern an America where once a year, for 12 hours, citizens get to let off steam by committing any crime - including murder - without fear of prosecution.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For Inquirer
Sure, summer blockbusters offer a few hours' respite to give your brain a vacation and escape into the air-conditioned comfort of your local multiplex. But three months is a long time to subsist on a visual diet of nothing more than caped crime-fighters, wisecracking animals, gunshots, explosions, and tire squeals. A number of local film series provide an offbeat alternative, celebrating the independent and the outrageous on a regular basis. Philadelphia Unnamed Film Festival (PUFF)
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
When I told Finding Dory star Ellen DeGeneres that I almost cried during the movie, the comedienne had a ready retort. "Just say you cried! It's okay," DeGeneres said, while the rest of those in attendance at her press conference roared in laughter. "We all cried. " When I told DeGeneres that even seeing parts of the film's trailer and replaying scenes from the film in my head made me tear up, DeGeneres talked about how she feels the film resonates with so many so deeply-and why. "I think it's so much more than a cartoon movie," she continued.
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