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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - Director Yoshimitsu Morita, whose films depicted the absurdity and vulnerability of everyday life in conformist Japan, has died. He was 61. Morita, who won international acclaim over his prolific 30-year career, died Tuesday of acute liver failure at a Tokyo hospital, said Yoko Ota, spokeswoman at Toei Co., the film company behind his latest work. Morita's movies were distinctly Japanese, depicting the fragile beauty of the nation's human psyche and visual landscape while daringly poking fun at its ridiculous tendency for rigid bureaucracy and ritualistic hierarchy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Latino Film Festival (PHLAFF) returns this weekend for its fifth year with a selection of 21 films (with a focus on shorts and documentaries), a panel discussion, and a youth workshop. Selections this year include films from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Peru, and, of course, the United States. Festival director Marangeli Mejia-Rabell said she hoped that PHLAFF not only raised the profile of minority filmmakers, but also inspired community activism.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2016
LOS ANGELES - When I interviewed Lana Condor , who plays fan-favorite mutant Jubilee in her first feature-and the new franchise entry, X-Men: Apocalypse , she did not even have a Wikipedia page yet. "No, I don't think I would," the 19-year-old said before laughing. Condor said starting out in such a giant tentpole movie had pluses and minuses. "It's a platform I'm lucky to have," she said, "and hopefully can use to get more work. But the downside is that filming X-Men was a dream.
NEWS
May 16, 2016
COMING THIS WEEK By Steven Rea The Angry Birds Movie From the video game of the same name - the flightless birds' island idyll is interrupted by an invasion of . . . pigs. With the voice talents of Peter Dinklage, Bill Hader, Kate McKinnon, Sean Penn(!), and Jason Sudekis. PG Love & Friendship Whit Stillman puts the finish on an unfinished Jane Austen novel ( Lady Susan ), with Kate Beckinsale in the lead - and American Chloƫ Sevigny joining a troupe of Brits.
NEWS
May 4, 2016
ISSUE | FILM TAX CREDIT Pa. break pays off The Commonwealth Foundation's Nathan Benefield was wrong to call for the end of the Pennsylvania film tax credit ("Time to end Pa.'s corporate-welfare handouts," April 26). He claimed that the returns on economic development programs don't justify the expense, and he cited industry studies that counted only direct tax payments to states from productions. In fact, an array of state and local taxes are paid by cast and crew, hospitality and municipal workers, and businesses that invest in and serve the film industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2016
Friday-Saturday By the numbers The "symphonic theater" work O Monsters First Draft performed by New Paradise Laboratories tells a fractured fairy tale about an odd family living in a "mansion made of numbers" and living under the rule of a matriarch who bases her decisions on a mysterious poetic equation that keeps the house from disintegrating. It's set to a score by the intriguing composer Bhob Rainey, derived from the mathematics of NASA asteroid tracking, Internet traffic patterns, and stock market prices ("phenomena that represent, to me, a certain unruly indifference that the universe holds towards our interpretation of it")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2016 | By Tre'vell Anderson, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
The formula for so-called black films is both specific and ill-defined: Jenifer Lewis, Lynn Whitfield, or Loretta Devine lead a mostly black cast, with Taye Diggs or Morris Chestnut in there somewhere. Spike Lee or Tyler Perry is writer, director, and star. Every character hides her purse around cousin Pookie, and prayer is the only substitute for a doctor's visit. There's often also a Soul Train line to Maze featuring Frankie Beverly's "Before I Let Go" and plenty of sassy neck rolling to go around.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
To call Christian Petzold a political filmmaker would do injustice to the beauty and emotional power of his work. The German director's films are informed by political passions and ideas, but they are expressed through deeply personal stories - from the 2000 breakout feature The State I Am, from the daily struggle of a pair of former terrorists who live in hiding with their teenage daughter, to 2012's Barbara , which features a stunning performance...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016
Repertory Films Annenberg Center - Bruce Montgomery Theatre 3680 Walnut St.; 215-898-6701. www.annenbergcenter.org . Twenty Feet From Stardom (2013) 4/19. 7 pm. Bryn Mawr Film Institute 824 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-527-9898. www.brynmawrfilm.org . Internet Cat Video Festival. $12; $9 seniors; $8 students. 4/20. 6 pm. Colonial Theatre 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-1228. www.thecolonialtheatre.com . Stop Making Sense (1984) $9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $5 children 12 and under.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
In the black-and-white film, father and son hawk fish on a Ninth Street that is no more. Thomas Anastasi, father, dreamer, lover, gambler. A cigarette dangling from his lips, he's tired of the long days hauling, gutting, and selling fish. He's thinking of buying that brand-new 1977 Cadillac, a $14,000 car, how he's earned it, how all his life he had nothing. He's thinking of traveling the world. Salvatore Anastasi. Blond, shaggy-haired, easygoing 18-year-old Salvy. His thoughts are on pretty Carol, of their wedding just days away, of taking over the family business and making his way in the world.
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