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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - Director Yoshimitsu Morita, whose films depicted the absurdity and vulnerability of everyday life in conformist Japan, has died. He was 61. Morita, who won international acclaim over his prolific 30-year career, died Tuesday of acute liver failure at a Tokyo hospital, said Yoko Ota, spokeswoman at Toei Co., the film company behind his latest work. Morita's movies were distinctly Japanese, depicting the fragile beauty of the nation's human psyche and visual landscape while daringly poking fun at its ridiculous tendency for rigid bureaucracy and ritualistic hierarchy.
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NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
When we last checked in with Steve Coogan - all the way back in early December - the British actor and comedy star was chin-deep in awards-season mode, campaigning for Philomena , the prestige picture in which he starred opposite Judi Dench , and which he cowrote and produced. It was based on the true story of an Irish retiree who joined a British journalist to look for the son she gave up for adoption as an unwed teen living in a Catholic convent. Philomena went on to receive four Academy Award nominations, including for best picture, for Dench (best actress)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Why wait? If you're the group that oversees the Philadelphia Film Festival, the annual fall movie marathon, and you've Kickstarted and fundraised, restored and retrofitted an old Center City moviehouse, why not throw a festival there whenever you want? Why just October? No reason. And so, to show off the Roxy Theater near Rittenhouse Square, and bring to town top-tier titles whose release schedules don't jibe with the main fall program, the Philadelphia Film Society offers its first Spring Showcase - 25 films in seven days.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE 12th annual Garden State Film Festival began yesterday in Atlantic City, having moved down the coast from its traditional home in Asbury Park. The late actor Robert Pastorelli and producer Diane Raver started the festival in part to help invigorate ongoing Asbury Park redevelopment, but in recent years the festival - which has attracted more than 35,000 attendees - has outgrown its North Jersey footprint, organizers say. This year, with seed money from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, the GSFF will be held in various venues in Atlantic City, beginning last night with a special 7 p.m. screening at the Boardwalk Hall Ballroom, of the 1926 silent classic "The Black Pirate," starring Douglas Fairbanks, with live music accompaniment on a Kimball organ (proceeds go to the Historic Organ Restoration committee)
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Watch Michael Fassbender - his chiseled mug encased in a cartoonish papier-mâché head - as the title character, the nutty front man for a rock band, in Frank . Watch Jesse Eisenberg and Jesse Eisenberg, doppelgangers going at each other, in a comedic take on Dostoyevsky's The Double . And watch God Help the Girl , a musical from moody Glaswegian combo Belle & Sebastian founder Stuart Murdoch . Over seven...
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
MOVIES MAY STOP production for any of a hundred reasons ("the script isn't ready," "we can't raise the money," "we've run out of money," etc.), but here's one you thankfully don't hear every day: The disaster movie "Deep Water," about a jet that crashes into the ocean on its way to Beijing, has been put on hold because of its similarities to the missing Malaysian plane, which disappeared on its way to . . . Beijing. Arclight Films said yesterday that preproduction has been halted for the time being.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
WIRED 96.5 midday host Casey is leaving the station after nine years. The former morning host said she decided not to renew her contract. The Temple grad's last day was yesterday. "There are so many things I have yet to conquer on my list, and sometimes we have to move on to do so," Casey said. "Love and appreciation for anyone who has been a fan or supported me over the years. I hope we continue our relationship wherever my new path leads!" Calls to Wired 96.5's program director, Dan Hunt , were not returned.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
FOLKS MILLING about the art museum steps at this week's special "Rocky" screening didn't notice the dapper, elderly gent standing next to the boxer's statue. A few asked him politely to move so they could snap a photo next to the bronze figure, and he did so, ending up near a T-shirt vendor, who wanted to sell him a Rocky shirt. But there would be no Rocky shirts and statues without this gentleman, director John Avildsen, who made the first "Rocky" with Sylvester Stallone and helped shape the character who's gone on to become an American folk hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan DeLuca from SXSW   South by Southwest kicked off in Austin, Texas, over the weekend, with its Interactive and Film festivals first. Statistics whiz Nate Silver and Grantland founder and hoops analyst Bill Simmons discussed sports tech at a panel for the SXsports segment. "A scientist is just a kid who never grew up," said astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson at his SXSW keynote Saturday with journalist Christie Nicholson . The host of the TV series Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey , which debuted on Fox Sunday night, Tyson held 3,500 attendees rapt in an engaging, funny hour-plus talk.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the next 10 days on the Internet, one four-letter word will be difficult to avoid: SXSW . That's because the South by Southwest Conference is getting underway in Austin, Texas, with the gathering's interactive and film portions starting in earnest tomorrow, followed by the annual music festival, which will crank up the volume starting Wednesday. The streets will be most crowded during the music fest, when more than 2,000 acts - from big names such as Coldplay and Cee-Lo Green to up-and-comers such as Philadelphia's Chill Moody and Low Cut Connie - descend on the Lone Star State's capital city.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
LOOKS LIKE it may have only taken one camera to make "7 Boxes," a low-budget but inventive Paraguayan thriller about a delivery boy mixed up with gangsters. The movie - well-received at the Toronto Film Festival - blends genres and influences, but it's essentially a one-crazy-night, shaggy-dog story about a delivery boy who agrees to hide seven boxes of contraband for a local crook, and ends up in the middle of a very big mess. Victor (Celso Franco) pushes his cartload of boxes through Asuncion, brought alive by a series of hand-held tracking shots (the directors obviously grew up on Martin Scorsese and Kathryn Bigelow)
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