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NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gorgeous and disturbing, Big Hero 6 is a departure for Disney: a film targeted at older kids, and the studio's first venture into straight-up comic book culture. Walt would flip in his cryogenic chamber if he saw this anime-style production. The protagonist is a 14-year-old robotics genius named Hiro Hamada, whose nanotechnology creation promises to change everything. Until it is stolen. The film is presumably set in the near future in a San Francisco altered by Asian influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
The Jinx , Andrew Jarecki's six-part HBO series about perennial murder suspect Robert Durst, is not the first time the filmmaker has told this tale. Subtitled The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst , Jarecki's TV documentary ended last Sunday with Durst's Whoa Nelly bathroom soliloquy: "What the hell did I do? Killed them all, of course. " In the preceding episodes, Jarecki, like a good prosecutor, laid out the evidence linking the peripatetic millionaire, now 71, to the 2000 slaying of Susan Berman, a friend believed to have information about the 1982 disappearance of Durst's wife, Kathie.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The sprawling culture and technology summit known as South by Southwest takes place in Austin, Texas, every March. It started out as a music festival in 1987. It still is one, but the madness that this corporate-branded mega-event brings to the streets of Austin, with thousands of acts, including a few dozen from Philadelphia, playing in more than 100 venues, doesn't get under way until next week. Before that happens, both the SXSW Film Festival - behind Sundance, the most influential annual festival for independent movies in the United States - and SXSW Interactive, the wide-ranging technology conference that first brought Twitter to the attention of the world in 2007, will occupy the Texas capital city.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THANK GOD for the Philadelphia Film Society! On Monday, it officially announced the acquisition of the historic Prince Music Theater, on Chestnut Street near Broad. The beloved theater had been shuttered since October, when the theatrical organization that occupied the building - the American Music Theater Festival - failed to find new leadership after its board chairman died. Prince reps tell me that the beleaguered theater had been in a constant state of bankruptcy but was being floated by its board chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  'Someday My Prince Will Come" is, of course, the signature song from Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs - the animated gem that enjoyed impressive box office at the Karlton, a second-run movie house at 1412 Chestnut St., way back in the spring of 1938. "Someday My Prince Will Come" could also serve as the new anthem for film lovers across Philadelphia and, in particular, Center City, which has fewer dedicated movie screens (14) than many suburban multiplexes.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Coming to a choice parcel on Chestnut Street just west of Broad: neither a chic new condominium nor another drugstore. The Prince Music Theater isn't going anywhere. The defunct theater in the center of town was sold Thursday to the Philadelphia Film Society - a transaction that not only gives the film group a new home, but also preserves the hall's role for arts groups that cannot afford pricier venues like the Kimmel Center. The theater has already reopened for business. Its first show under new ownership - The Last Jimmy , a hip-hop musical - is slated to open March 18. It will still be known as the Prince Theater for the time being.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015
THE GENTLEMEN stationed at the Disney princess tribute at the Philadelphia Flower Show were doing their best to be patient with me. Not only did I not know the names of any of the flowers ("Is that an orchid?"), I often could not decode the most basic design clues. To my shame, since I'm the movie critic, and I was dispatched to evaluate the flower show on that basis. I was stymied, for instance, by the meaning of artfully constructed bunches of red carnations, until State College florist and designer Daniel Vaughn gave me a tactful prompt.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Moses allegedly liked to record video of girls and women at the beach and sports events. He also did it secretly in store dressing rooms and homes - even of women in bed with him, police say. Then, they add, he posted the videos on a pornographic website on which he had a following. "Despicable and offensive" is how William Colarulo, superintendent of Radnor Township police, put it. Moses, 37, of the 700 block of Broad Acres Road in Narberth, was charged Monday with multiple counts of invasion of privacy, criminal use of a communication device, trespass, and related crimes.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
SEAN MOSES, an accused serial peeping tom, wrote a tutorial to go with a video of two Villanova University coeds undressing that police say he posted on a porn website: "When you get caught out of position you ruin what could have been an awesome semester in voyeurism 101," he wrote. Moses, 37, got caught out of position. And yesterday, Radnor Township Police said, detectives ruined his "semester in voyeurism 101" when they showed up at the Narberth home he shares with his girlfriend and their 6-year-old daughter and arrested him on more than 200 criminal counts for his voyeuristic videos.
NEWS
March 3, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A 20-SOMETHING man was seated yesterday next to a teen girl at 30th Street Station, his arm around her small shoulders, working his charms to lure her to a party and so much more. But a film crew stationed a few feet away and a small number of adults standing nearby were a sign that all was not as creepy as it may have seemed. It was all in the service of "Keeping Our Children Safe: Online and IRL (In Real Life)," a volunteer, small-film production about human trafficking involving a couple of professional actors and five students from the Philadelphia High School for the Creative and Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Gabe Polsky's Red Army is a documentary about hockey - call it a hockumentary, or a puckumentary, if you must. (I must, apparently.) But this madly entertaining account of the Soviets' historic domination of the game - repeatedly winning Olympic gold, then famously losing it to the upstart Americans at the 1980 Winter Games in Lake Placid - is much more than a sports movie. It's about Cold War politics, about national pride, about how we affix our hopes and dreams to athletes and athletic competitions, how we identify with sports and sports identifies us. It is about one charismatic Russian, Vyacheslav Fetisov, whose skating and shooting - and diplomatic - skills have proved remarkable.
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