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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Can you make a film that criticizes gun violence in America while also reveling in a relentless, gory orgy of gun violence, knife violence, chain-saw violence, and ax violence? That's the plight of the Purge franchise, an auteurish series of hyper-violent, dystopian thrillers from writer-director James DeMonaco ( The Negotiator , Skinwalkers ) now in its third installment with The Purge: Election Year . The premise and the basic story line are familiar: Set in the near future, the Purge movies concern an America where once a year, for 12 hours, citizens get to let off steam by committing any crime - including murder - without fear of prosecution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
For 45 years, Paul Sheriff didn't talk about his childhood. "Compartmentalizing things made it easier to move forward," said Sheriff, 60, a professor of graphic design at Temple University's Tyler School of Art. "I didn't want sympathy. I didn't want pity. I thought those were bad emotions, but I'm learning they're not. " Then, seven years ago, Sheriff had earned a sabbatical, a time of contemplation, and he decided he needed to face the disaster that changed the trajectory of his life at the young age of 10. In June 1966, Sheriff's parents and his 14-year-old sister were killed in a small-plane crash.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
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NEWS
September 12, 2016
The Lady Chablis, 59, the transgender performer who became an unlikely celebrity for her role in the 1994 best-seller Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil , died Thursday in Savannah, Ga. Ms. Chablis' sister, Cynthia Ponder, confirmed the death. A close friend, Cale Hall, said Ms. Chablis died of pneumonia and had been in the hospital for a month. A modern, nonfiction take on Southern Gothic storytelling, author John Berendt's Midnight thrust Savannah into the pop-culture spotlight.
NEWS
September 7, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
Kickboxer lives! A reboot of the classic 1989 Jean-Claude Van Damme film, the film Kickboxer: Vengeance is hitting select theaters this weekend (and will be available on Video on Demand as well). The story, about a man avenging his brother's death, remains largely the same. However, although Van Damme has a small role in the reboot, the rest of the cast is decidedly different. Alain Moussi replaces Van Damme as Kurt Sloane. Van Damme portrays Master Durand, Dave Bautista plays the villainous Tong Po, the late Darren Shahlavi portrays Eric Sloane, Gina Carano plays Marcia, Georges St.-Pierre plays Kavi, Sara Malakul Lane portrays Liu and Matthew Ziff plays Bronco.
NEWS
August 28, 2016
Veteran actor Marvin Kaplan, 89, perhaps best known for his recurring role on the long-running sitcom Alice , died Friday in Burbank, Calif., where he resided, said John Gallogly, executive director of Theatre West, with which Mr. Kaplan was associated. Besides his portrayal on Alice of Henry, a telephone linesman and frequent patron of Mel's Diner, Mr. Kaplan voiced the character Choo-Choo in the 1960s cartoon series Top Cat . More recently, he made several appearances on the Ted Danson comedy Becker . Other credits include the 1963 film It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World " and the 1965 Blake Edwards comedy The Great Race . The New York native also was a regular on the sitcom Meet Millie , which first aired on radio and was also seen on television from 1952 to 1955.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Comcast Corp.-owned NBCUniversal will fold DreamWorks Animation into its Universal films business but retain the DreamWorks campus and studios in Glendale, Calif., the companies said Tuesday. In April, Comcast agreed to buy the entertainment firm that produced Shrek , Kung Fu Panda , and other animated features for $3.8 billion. That deal closed Monday. Employee cutbacks at DreamWorks were not announced Tuesday, though they are expected among headquarters staffers. DreamWorks will now be a subsidiary of NBCUniversal, which owns feature-film brands including Universal Pictures and its movie studio, which had a blockbuster run in 2015 that it hasn't matched this year.
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
T o Catch a Thief is a great summer movie. It's not a bombastic, overproduced CGI smashfest (see: Marvel movies, even the good ones). It's not a self-serious action romp, with stomach-twisting camera work (see: the Bourne movies and all the third-rate thrillers that cribbed off that series). And it isn't a bland romantic comedy, with stiff jokes and downright cadaverous chemistry. And it's not that they don't make them like To Catch a Thief anymore; it's just that they don't have Alfred Hitchcock to bulk up slender little plots like this one. This movie is basically made up of Cary Grant romping around the French Riviera, being courted by women almost half his age - principally Grace Kelly.
NEWS
August 22, 2016
BEGINNING WITH Blood Feast in 1963, Herschell Gordon Lewis took horror films to unprecedented lengths (or depths) of explicit blood and guts, defining what came to be known as the "splatter film. " He has influenced generations of independent filmmakers, chief among them superfan John Waters. On Sunday, local horror-film presenters Exhumed Films will do a marathon screening of five Lewis classics: Blood Feast, 2000 Maniacs!, Color Me Blood Red, The Gruesome Twosome, and The Wizard of Gore . As a special treat, the 87-year-old filmmaker will be in attendance to answer questions and lead a singalong of the theme to 2000 Maniacs!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
For 45 years, Paul Sheriff didn't talk about his childhood. "Compartmentalizing things made it easier to move forward," said Sheriff, 60, a professor of graphic design at Temple University's Tyler School of Art. "I didn't want sympathy. I didn't want pity. I thought those were bad emotions, but I'm learning they're not. " Then, seven years ago, Sheriff had earned a sabbatical, a time of contemplation, and he decided he needed to face the disaster that changed the trajectory of his life at the young age of 10. In June 1966, Sheriff's parents and his 14-year-old sister were killed in a small-plane crash.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
There is a certain awkwardness about Uber. With a taxi or a bus, there's a professional divide that allows passengers to disassociate and pretend the person at the wheel is apart from them. With Uber, the driver could just as easily be on the stool next to you at a bar as behind the wheel of the car. He could be sucked into your life, or you into his. Matthew Cherry's new movie 9 Rides , which plays Sunday at the final day of the BlackStar Film Festival, chronicles a night in the life of one Uber driver.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
FILM DIRECTOR Tina Morton says 80-year-old Adeline Behlin remembers when her family fled South Carolina for Philadelphia. "Her grandfather had been beaten by a mob for trying to organize black people to vote," Morton said. "He had worked on the railroad and when they beat him, they left him on the railroad tracks. He felt the vibration of a train coming and had just enough strength to crawl off the tracks. A neighbor found him. And the family fled the next day. " Morton recounts Behlin's story in "When We Came Up Here," one of several short films about people finding new lives in Philadelphia that will be shown Saturday at International House in West Philadelphia as part of a project called the Great Migration: A City Transformed.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Steven Rea, MOVIE CRITIC
IT'S HARD NOT to think of Breaking Bad while watching The Infiltrator . And not just because Bryan Cranston stars in both - as Walter White, the chemistry teacher-turned-mad-meth-king in the groundbreaking series, of course, and as Robert Mazur, an undercover G-man who burrows deeply, dirtily, into the world of drug cartels and international money-laundering in Brad Furman's true-crime pic. Cranston was iconic, a walking tornado of moral crisis,...
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