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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - Director Yoshimitsu Morita, whose films depicted the absurdity and vulnerability of everyday life in conformist Japan, has died. He was 61. Morita, who won international acclaim over his prolific 30-year career, died Tuesday of acute liver failure at a Tokyo hospital, said Yoko Ota, spokeswoman at Toei Co., the film company behind his latest work. Morita's movies were distinctly Japanese, depicting the fragile beauty of the nation's human psyche and visual landscape while daringly poking fun at its ridiculous tendency for rigid bureaucracy and ritualistic hierarchy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016
Repertory Films Artworks 19 Everett Alley, Trenton; 609-394-9436. www.artworkstrenton.org . Film Nights. $8. 1/15. 7 pm. Bryn Mawr Film Institute 824 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-527-9898. www.brynmawrfilm.org . Babe (1995) $5; $4 children. 1/16. 11 am. Selma (2014) $12; $9 seniors; $8 children and students with ID. 1/18. 7 pm. Miss Representation (2011) $12; $9 seniors; $8 children and students with ID. 1/21. 7 pm. Colonial Theatre 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-1228.
NEWS
January 13, 2016
By Peter J. Wallison We can all agree that the financial crisis was caused by a "mortgage meltdown" mostly among subprime and other risky mortgages. But what neither The Big Short nor its greed narrative tells us is why there were so many of these mortgages in the financial system to begin with. The answer: It was not Wall Street. In June 2008, just before the crisis, more than half of all U.S. mortgages - 31 million loans - were subprime or otherwise risky. Of these, 76 percent were on the books of government agencies, primarily the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs)
NEWS
December 31, 2015
Murray Weissman, 90, a veteran Hollywood publicist who worked on Oscar campaigns for such films as Dances with Wolves and Shakespeare in Love , died Monday of pancreatic cancer at his Los Angeles home. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Mr. Weissman worked as a publicist for ABC and CBS. He moved to movies in the mid-1960s and oversaw Universal's release of Jaws in 1973. He began specializing in awards campaigns in the 1990s, representing dozens of best picture Oscar contenders along with hit shows such as Breaking Bad and Mad Men . An active member of the film and television academies, Mr. Weissman was feted by many clients and friends feted last month after they learned of his cancer diagnosis.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Jake Blumgart
When Princess Mononoke debuted in America in 1999, it offered a decisive argument against those who would dismiss anime as a juvenile genre. There had been plenty of other movies that could have proven such a point to the discerning viewer, but Hayao Miyazaki's richly textured fantasy was the first to break into the mainstream. The fact that Princess Mononoke reliably makes the rounds of midnight movie screenings, as it will at the Ritz at the Bourse Friday, speaks to the depth and breadth of its appeal.
SPORTS
December 21, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Staff Writer
The game-winning touchdown from last year's Eagles-Cardinals game came on the big screen in a production room at NFL Films' Mount Laurel campus Friday morning, and Ron Jaworski and Merril Hoge both saw exactly what happened in the Birds' loss. They had studied the film throughout the week. Jaworski, the former Eagles quarterback, and fellow ESPN analyst Hoge identified the play as a key discussion point for Sunday's rematch. After seeing how the 75-yard touchdown catch exposed a major threat to the Eagles defense, they turned their attention to a blitz in a Cardinals-49ers game on Nov. 29. It was a "triple-A gap blitz" - the type of jargon former players use when they speak freely about football.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Staff Writer
IF YOU ever want to dabble in time travel, try whispering two words to Philadelphia Eagles fans of a certain age: Andre Waters. Let it sink in for a moment, like a secret password, and watch the years disappear from their faces. Wistful smiles replace the usual heavy frowns. Waters was an underdog who had to fight and claw for his job - not the most naturally gifted guy on the field, but one of the toughest. He was, in other words, the embodiment of all the blue collar traits Philly sports fans always hope to see in a local athlete.
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
How'd this happen? It's December already, the Oscar campaigns are upon us, the bookshops and video stores (are there still video stores? - yes, a few) are decked in tinsel and candy cane, and e-commerce sites are abustle with Yuletidey pop-up ads. Here's a list of 10 guaranteed-to-please gift ideas - books and disc sets, too - for the cineaste in your family, the film buff in your circle of friends, the James Bond and Star Wars obsessives, too. Enjoy. The Apu Trilogy. Satyajit Ray. The Criterion Collection Blu-ray, $99.95 Originally released between 1955 and 1959, Ray's Pather Panchali (Song of the Little Road)
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
An obituary told a tale that "reached out and grabbed me," says Nancy Spielberg. "I felt that it would make a great feature film. " She was right. Above and Beyond , the documentary Spielberg produced about Jewish airmen who flew combat missions for a newborn Israel in 1948, will be screened Tuesday, Dec. 15, at Congregation Beth El in Voorhees. The producer, whose brother is director Steven Spielberg, will be on hand for a reception and a question-and-answer session.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2015 | By Howard Gensler, Daily News
WHAT DO 1950s lesbians, a transgender prostitute, stop-action animation, African soldiers and Bah-stan Globe journalists have in common? They're part of the nominated films for the 31st Spirit Awards, announced yesterday, and the five films vying for best feature are "Anomalisa," "Beasts of No Nation," "Tangerine" (a film shot on iPhones), "Carol" and "Spotlight. " Film Independent is behind the awards, which honor "uniqueness of vision, original and provocative subject matter," and are American films made for $20 million or less.
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