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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After Red Mascara, 92, wrote "I'm From New Jersey" in 1960, he started campaigning for it to become the official state song. After 54 years, the effort "needs a spark," says Red, who was born Joseph Rocco Mascari in Phillipsburg, Warren County, where he still lives. "Maybe this is the spark. " "This" is an almost-finished documentary by Daniel Goodman. His film also is called I'm From New Jersey , and its hero is a gentlemanly, self-taught tunesmith who refuses to give up. I'm from New Jersey / and I'm proud about it / I love the Garden State "I realized that his song really is all about what I was trying to talk about in my film," says Goodman, 30, who's raised $48,000 for the project through the Kickstarter online funding platform.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2015
I LIVE IN the Andalucia neighborhood of lower Bensalem and use SEPTA up and down Frankford and Torresdale avenues regularly. Upon recently happening by the old Holmesburg Prison on Torresdale Avenue (and in the past riding my horse in the area) I got to thinking that, rather than what seems to be its present use - storage for city vehicles and other equipment - perhaps it could be converted into a local attraction . . . much like the old Eastern State Penitentiary in Fairmount. I remember a film, "12 Monkeys," having been filmed at Holmesburg sometime in the '90s (a buddy of mine from our gym played an extra 'prisoner' in the movie)
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventeen years ago, Mark Christopher watched as 54 , the film he wrote and directed, was taken away from him by Miramax and recut beyond recognition. The movie - starring Ryan Phillippe, Neve Campbell, Salma Hayek, and Mike Myers (as club owner Steve Rubell) - concerns the decadent goings-on at the New York club Studio 54 in the 1970s. In Christopher's mind, it was a dark film with strong gay themes. By the time of its release, it was about a plucky Jersey boy trying to make it in the big city.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday night, screenwriter Arash Amel gave Twitter a look inside something Hollywood rarely likes to talk about: what it feels like to be part of a disaster. Amel wrote the screenplay for the ill-fated Grace Kelly biopic Grace of Monaco . Those in the know already feel bad for Amel after reading that sentence. For those not: Grace of Monaco , starring Nicole Kidman and directed by La Vie en Rose 's Olivier Dahan, was scheduled for release in fall 2013 and meant for Oscar glory but didn't debut until the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, where it was booed.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Harlan Jacobson, For The Inquirer
CANNES - The French threw the world a film party and then ate the cherry on top of the dessert. Dheepan - about a Tamil Tiger who quits the Sri Lankan revolution, creates a makeshift "family" with two other refugees, and flees to Paris, where he lands a job as a building superintendent in the lawless suburbs - took the Palme D'Or, the Golden Palm, at the 68th Cannes Film Festival Sunday night. The film by Jacques Audiard, whose jailhouse story A Prophet won second prize in 2009, was one of a huge contingent French films figuring prominently in the competition for the top prize (and in other sections at well)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
A Phresh face for film fest Philadelphia has its largest presence in years at the Tribeca Film Festival. Cosmo DeNicola , owner of the Philadelphia Soul, was proud to represent the City of Brotherly Love on Monday at a luncheon at the United Nations headquarters, in New York City, to recognize Iraqi filmmaker Yasir Kareem . Kareem was honored for the creation of his short film "Kingdom of Garbage," which is featured this week...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When the Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art (a.k.a. PhilaMOCA, at 531 N. 12th St.) hosts the third annual Cinedelphia Film Festival, curator Eric Bresler will unspool his usual glut of oddball renegade films. For 2015's theme - filmmakers working outside Hollywood's system - Cinedelphia will run a 12-hour Best Worst Movie Marathon, the famously cheesy fan-film Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation , and a retrospective of Broomall native and Johnny Carson-regular Len Cella's aptly titled Moron Movies . Cinedelphia's main event pays tribute to local filmmaker Don Argott, his producing/life partner, Sheena Joyce (the couple just welcomed a baby)
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUSTIN GIANI had a head for figures. But along with his proficiency with numbers, Justin was a friendly, cheerful colleague with a contagious smile who charmed everyone who came in contact with him. Justin was the chief financial officer of Breaking Glass Pictures, a Philadelphia-based film distribution company. "Justin was more than an employee," the company said in a statement. "He was a master of numbers, a ball of energy, an even-keeled ray of light that brought smiles to all he crossed paths with, no matter the situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2015
Steve Friedman, was a local radio/TV personality known as "Mr. Movie" to film buffs throughout a large part of North America. The Harrisburg native had a lifelong passion for motion pictures and an encyclopedic memory that made him a one-man IMDB.com decades before the Internet existed. His ability to retain minute details of virtually every film he ever watched bordered on the supernatural. Friedman, who died while awaiting a kidney transplant at age 62, in 2009, spent several decades as the region's go-to guy about all things movies, primarily as the host of a late-night Saturday program on WPHT-AM (1210)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The inaugural Women's Film Festival was born in an odd place: a ladies room. Co-founder Layne Marie Williams met Phuong Nguyen while chatting in the bathroom of West Philly restaurant Landmark Americana. Nguyen, a veteran of the Asian American Film Festival, and Williams, a University of the Arts grad, exchanged cards, leading to the birth of the female-geared film festival. Starting Friday at the Ethical Society, the fest seeks to "encourage women to embrace leading roles in the film world and to inspire men and women to work side by side in the arts," Williams said.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
TO STOP bullying, we have to understand the issues that cause bullies to act out in the first place. That's why director Amy S. Weber explores a bully's perspective in her film "A Girl Like Her," which opens today. "We hear so many of the stories from the victim's perspective, and we wanted to offer another side of the story - a story that we very rarely, if ever, get to hear," Weber said. Weber has written and produced more than 40 award-winning educational documentaries, in which she's explored tough topics facing youth, such as violence and eating disorders.
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