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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - Director Yoshimitsu Morita, whose films depicted the absurdity and vulnerability of everyday life in conformist Japan, has died. He was 61. Morita, who won international acclaim over his prolific 30-year career, died Tuesday of acute liver failure at a Tokyo hospital, said Yoko Ota, spokeswoman at Toei Co., the film company behind his latest work. Morita's movies were distinctly Japanese, depicting the fragile beauty of the nation's human psyche and visual landscape while daringly poking fun at its ridiculous tendency for rigid bureaucracy and ritualistic hierarchy.
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NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County DJ who was charged with 300 counts of sexual assault and child pornography in April allegedly also raped and filmed a woman last September who thought she was being hired for a modeling job, the district attorney's office said Tuesday. Daniel Milowicki, 28, a self-employed photographer and disc jockey who uses the name DJ Dan Dub C, was out on bail when he was arrested for a second time on July 16 on rape and other charges, said District Attorney Tom Hogan. Milowicki routinely worked at events such as children's pool parties, birthday parties, and school dances, as well as at weddings, bars and other events, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hollywood is in town Don't be too surprised if you run across actors  Anna Gunn  ( Breaking Bad ),  James Purefoy  ( The Following ), or Carrie Preston ( The Good Wife ) in and around Philadelphia in the next couple of weeks. They're here to shoot a new film by indie helmer  Meera Menon  ( Farah Goes Bang ) called  Equity . It's a drama about the world of Wall Street: Yep, our town is to double for the Big Apple. Country's royal couple split As everyone knows, the best country-music love songs have sad endings.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
LOS ANGELES - Evangeline Lilly plays yet another strong female character in "Ant-Man," but don't expect her character, Hope Van Dyne, to kick as much butt as the movie's trailer implies. Lilly feels this is a good thing. "I think the good intentions of male-dominated Hollywood have resulted - again, with the best of intentions - in what I feel are a lot of female heroes acting like men," Lilly said recently in an interview during the film's press event. "What I feel is [important to]
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Ant-Man is upon us. On Friday, another superhero heads to the multiplexes. A Silver Age brethren of Iron Man, Spider-Man, and Thor, Ant-Man is, um, a little different. Sure, he has the superhuman strength, the supercool costume, and the supersmart-alecky retorts of a Marvel Comics crimebuster. But this guy is less than an inch high, and if he joined his fellow Formicidae in an invasion of your kitchen pantry, you'd grab the Raid and gun him down with the rest of the pests. How can this tiny speck possibly do battle with evil masterminds bent on world domination?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Communiy development and independent cinema combine in Movies on the Block, a series of free outdoor screenings sponsored by the Philadelphia Film Society and backed by local foundation Fierce Advocacy Fund. PFS established Movies on the Block to increase access to films across the city, adapting existing urban spaces to meet the needs of areas with "chronic concerns," such as gun violence and health issues such as obesity and diabetes. "When movie houses started, it was always a community gathering place," said Allison Koehler, education and programs director at PFS. Now, "a lot of us feel that going to the movies is an individual experience, and we want to bring back movie-going as a gathering place.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric JonRosh, the creative genius behind TV's most beloved miniseries of all time, The Spoils of Babylon , graces our screens a year later with the earth-shattering follow-up, The Spoils Before Dying , a three-hour miniseries of world historical significance offered by IFC across three consecutive nights. This world-changing event starts Wednesday. A self-proclaimed "auteur-storyteller-novelist-birdwatcher-yachtsman-journalist-short-story-ist-journeyman," JonRosh is the ultra-ridiculous, hyperbolic, rotund Orson Welles-ian character played with delicious irony by Will Ferrell.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Don't look for light cinematic fare for the opening Tuesday of the Philadelphia gay film festival qFLIX. Its second annual iteration, which runs through Sunday, will lead with a moody romantic drama, Beautiful Something , set here and shot by local director Joseph Graham. And the weighty stuff continues, with documentaries whose titles speak to global LGBT struggles, among them A Sinner in Mecca andthe savage, Ugandan-made Outed: The Painful Reality . One film being buzzed about in Philadelphia's gay community, however, has a comic streak as wide as the United States: Be Who You Are , a deceptively simple, charming, buoyant documentary to premiere at 7 p.m. Thursday at Prince Music Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Deeply personal and filled with love, Maya Forbes' Infinitely Polar Bear is nonetheless a hard movie to watch - hard to watch comfortably. Based on her experiences growing up with a father who was in and out of institutions, diagnosed with manic depression, Forbes' film throws a memoir-ish lasso around late-1970s Cambridge, Mass., where a family with a wildly careening dad, a mom trying to pursue a career, and two girls caught in the throes go...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's widely considered by critics as one of the top directors in the world, but Taiwan-based Malaysian Chinese auteur Tsai Ming-liang's works are hardly rarefied creations. And while he's something of a minimalist, his movies do not have the antiseptic, static, arid feel of so many films classed under that banner. Films such as Vive L'Amour (1994), The River (1997), and his most recent entry, the 2013 masterpiece Stray Dogs are lively, urban parables that burrow into the nitty-gritty of life in modern Taipei.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seemed to Philadelphia Art Commission members a curious notion: SugarHouse Casino was asking for approval to finance a documentary and annual film festival to meet its mandate to invest in public art. Members were receptive Wednesday, but had questions: How does a $100,000 film about the history of Philadelphia as a onetime motion picture mecca constitute public art? How, unlike the LOVE statue, would it be visible to the public? Would such a project endure for years? "What assurances has the city . . . that this is going to be lasting?"
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