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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rare, in the course of interviewing movie stars about their new film, that one of the actors leans over and smacks another in the head, then rips a soggy bagel out of his mouth. It's simply not done in most proper social settings, even among pampered film actors. But then, most movie stars aren't Jacob and Adam Worton, the blond, blue- eyed, 19-month-old identical twins who make their acting debuts - actually, their crawling, grinning and drooling debuts - in the new comedy Baby's Day Out. "WWAAAAAHHH!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Today is Black Thursday," Channel 6 cameraman Bob Kravitz said yesterday, the day Saddam Hussein had threatened a "rain of fire. " After almost a week in Saudi Arabia, Kravitz and Action News reporter Dann Cuellar have decided to sleep during the day and remain awake at night because "that's when he starts peppering us with his Scuds," Kravitz said in a telephone interview from eastern Saudi Arabia. "This was the first morning we didn't get a 'wake-up' call. We call it Scud awake," he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Rebecca Nugent
Many parents in Evesham Township have found the recent curriculum changes in the K-8 district, which include the video That's a Family!, unacceptable. The reasons vary, and I can speak only to my own rationale. While I understand and support the schools' efforts to promote respect for all persons, the district circumvented this goal when it presented materials explicitly or implicitly endorsing one particular moral viewpoint over competing views. That's a Family! was produced not to encourage tolerance, but to aggressively advocate the normalization of homosexual behavior.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2007 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The weeds are sky-high in Times Square. Deer run the avenues, hopscotching around abandoned cars. Mass graves fill Central Park. Manhattan, in the year 2012, is a ghost town. Not even Rudy Giuliani could save the place. But maybe Will Smith can. In I Am Legend , a big-budget adaptation of Richard Matheson's 1954 sci-fi novel (and two film versions: the 1964 Last Man on Earth and the 1971 Charlton Heston-starring Omega Man ), Smith plays Robert Neville, a military scientist who seems to be the last man in Manhattan.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Bridgeton, N.J., is poised for its second annual one-day/one-film food festival, April 21, with a screening of Like Water for Chocolate , director Alfonso Arau's 1992 film based on the novel by Laura Esquivel. Eventgoers will be treated to a beer/wine tasting with appetizers before the film, and a full-course dinner and dessert after it, with a meal inspired by the foods in the movie story line and produced by local restaurateur-experts in Mexican cuisines. Traditional Mexican music and a cooking demonstration round out the evening at the Ashley McCormick Center, a former furniture emporium on East Commerce Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
The man responsible for bringing the controversial film, "Hail, Mary," to Philadelphia pondered the dozen religious protesters who were praying the rosary on the street below and felt a certain sense of relief. "We think this is the easier part now," film programmer Ray Murray, a Roman Catholic, said yesterday afternoon in his second-floor office as the French movie began a one-week run at the Theatre of the Living Arts on South Street. "We've been under a lot of tension with the letters and calls . . .," Murray said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The people behind the selling of the movie "The Last Temptation of Christ" are hoping the good word from the nation's movie critics will keep the box office humming. Although Universal Pictures refuses to talk about the marketing of the movie, it's clear that the studio is shunning TV advertising in favor of a low-profile newspaper campaign to reach the movie's target audience and to cool opposition to the film. And one industry observer speculated that to counter the outcry against the film, the company had been forced to spend more on advertising than it wanted.
LIVING
March 30, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
Color film is expensive and getting more so. Several years ago, market manipulations pushed silver prices to $50 an ounce, and manufacturers of film and paper escalated prices sharply. Now that silver is back to less than $10 an ounce, film and paper prices keep going up, with no ceiling in sight. One way to economize on film is to buy in volume. A roll of Kodachrome 36's costs $7 list, but if you buy 20 rolls at a time almost any dealer will give you a discount, and of course if you buy a case, 300 rolls, some will cut the price further and even store it for you. Buying film in quantity from discounters is not a bad idea, because lower prices ensure rapid turnover of stocks, meaning that you will be getting fresh film, not something that has been gathering dust on the shelf.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
It begins with teenagers drinking "just for fun. " It ends in death. During a 13-minute color video, a car carrying a drunken driver and his friend veers out of control on a narrow, County Line Road bridge. The car strikes a guardrail and flips onto its roof. Workers from the Horsham Township Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Squad rush to the scene and perform lifesaving emergency procedures. But the teenagers die. The video, which took volunteers from local school districts and businesses two years to make, simulates the dangers of drunken driving in an effort to dissuade teenagers from making fatal mistakes, one of the producers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be a fan of environmental Vice President-elect Al Gore to enjoy Tropical Rainforest, the Franklin Institute's new film, opening in the Omniverse Theater Nov. 20 for a seven-month run. The movie will bring to four-story life the flora and fauna of some of the world's rain forests. You'll see a blue Ulysses butterfly emerging from its chrysalis; leaf-cutting ants marching across a log with their bounty; pythons looking you in the eye and more. The film also focuses on recent destruction of some of these fragile environments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
FILM DIRECTOR Rupesh Paul , who sparked anger earlier this year with plans for "The Vanishing Act," a love triangle-themed movie about the Malaysia Airlines plane disappearance, says he's changing the plot to a thriller so he won't offend the families of the missing. Yeah, that should do it. Can't imagine why a grieving relative wouldn't appreciate that thoughtful gesture. "We respect the sentiments of all those who experienced loss due to the tragedy, and the intention was never to benefit out of it," the Indian director said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their visages enthrall us, their physiques amaze us. Why, then, are so many A-list stars so eager to deprive us of those pleasures by acting in animated films? Why would acclaimed thespian Sir Ben Kingsley and his Boxtrolls costars - Elle Fanning, Simon Pegg, and Tracy Morgan - want to be in a film that won't allow them to use their actor's bag of tricks? No facial gestures or physical movements. No costumes, no props, no set. Voice acting, after all, consists of speaking lines in a lonely sound booth.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gorgeous and disturbing, Big Hero 6 is a departure for Disney: a film targeted at older kids, and the studio's first venture into straight-up comic book culture. Walt would flip in his cryogenic chamber if he saw this anime-style production. The protagonist is a 14-year-old robotics genius named Hiro Hamada, whose nanotechnology creation promises to change everything. Until it is stolen. The film is presumably set in the near future in a San Francisco altered by Asian influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
J OHN DU PONT is a notorious name for longtime residents of the Philadelphia area who remember him killing Olympic wrestler Dave Schultz in 1996 at du Pont's Newtown Square compound. But neither director Bennett Miller , nor actor Anthony Michael Hall had heard of the case before starting work on the movie "Foxcatcher. " In fact, Miller only heard about it after a stranger handed him an envelope full of clips about the story at an event. The film held its Philadelphia premiere at the Prince Music Theater last night, where the likes of Greater Philadelphia Film Office's Sharon Pinkenson , negotiator on the du Pont case Anthony Paparo , Kal Rudman and Cozen O'Connor's Justin Wineburgh walked the red carpet.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than five weeks, the family of Sunil Tripathi of Radnor mobilized a massive effort to find him. The Internet was a major resource. Family posted videos pleading for the Brown University student to come home. Social networks spread the word about the missing 22-year-old, but then, in a matter of hours, they became the medium by which Tripathi was falsely identified as a terrorist responsible for the Boston Marathon bombings. A new documentary, Help Us Find Sunil Tripathi , shows how old and new media's quest to be first with information wrongly accused an innocent man and created a nightmare for Tripathi's family.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Love of literature. Lust for food. The history of the Israeli Air Force. These are just some of the themes that will come together in the 34th annual Philadelphia Jewish Film Festival, which will screen 16 feature films and seven shorts at area venues, including the Gershman Y and the National Museum of American Jewish History, from Saturday through Nov. 16. This year, there is a notable profusion of "personal stories about individuals who...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
"FOXCATCHER," a film starring Steve Carell and Channing Tatum that dramatizes the Newtown Square-based murder of Olympic wrestler Dave Schultz , will have a red-carpet premiere in Philly on Monday. Anthony Michael Hall , the star of many a Brat Pack movie, including "The Breakfast Club" and "Sixteen Candles," will walk the red carpet, along with director Bennett Miller ("Capote," "Moneyball") and Schultz's widow, Nancy (played by Sienna Miller in the film)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
If a cinema orgy promising more than 100 films from 28 countries in 11 days can ever seem manageable, the 23d Philadelphia Film Festival does it. It's not remotely possible to catch everything in the ambitious program, which began Thursday night with the gala premiere of Birdman and ends Oct. 26 with more than a dozen titles spread across four venues. But the selection and scheduling of films - from awards-season candidates to homegrown docs, from musicals to new masterworks - makes sense, somehow.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE 23RD PHILADELPHIA Film Festival ramps up today with an assortment of Hollywood sneak peaks and buzzed-about indies and foreign titles. The festival officially commenced yesterday with opening day screenings of Bill Murray's "St Vincent" and also "Birdman," the latter featuring Michael Keaton's sensational and sure-to-be Oscar-nominated performance as an aging Hollywood star mounting a Broadway comeback. The festival concludes Oct. 26 with a closing night screening of another likely Oscar contender, "Wild," featuring Reese Witherspoon in an adaptation of Cheryl Strayed's best-seller about a thousand-mile hike on the Pacific Crest Trail.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
M O'NE DAVIS ' biggest fan? Spike Lee . "Do the Right Thing" and "Malcolm X" director Lee was in Philly this weekend, hanging out with the Taney Dragons phenom and the rest of the team. Why? I hear it's because he's making a documentary about the Philly ballers who made it to the semifinals of the Little League World Series this year, capturing the hearts of our fickle town. A tipster told me that a film crew was spotted shooting at Marian Anderson Rec Center, at 18th and Fitzwater streets.
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