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NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez and Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writers
John S. Middleton, the billionaire part-owner of the Phillies, is battling in court with a younger sister over a 2003 deal in which he bought her and others out of the family's conglomerate for about $200 million and then sold part of the firm four years later for $2.9 billion, according to documents filed in Montgomery County Orphan's Court last week. The sister, Anna K. Nupson, has yet to make specific claims of wrongdoing in court. But she said in a court document last month that she may bring "substantive claims that pertain to possible self-dealing" by her brother.
NEWS
May 10, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
When Gerry and Marguerite Lenfest sit still long enough to accept the Philadelphia Award this week, it will be entirely appropriate to fill the air with honorifics and superlatives: The big cash behind the expansion of the Curtis Institute of Music. On track to become the most generous donors in the history of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But the unseen hands of the Lenfests as civic catalysts have been every bit as deft as the ones signing checks. "He does not give just for the sake of giving.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When the Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art (a.k.a. PhilaMOCA, at 531 N. 12th St.) hosts the third annual Cinedelphia Film Festival, curator Eric Bresler will unspool his usual glut of oddball renegade films. For 2015's theme - filmmakers working outside Hollywood's system - Cinedelphia will run a 12-hour Best Worst Movie Marathon, the famously cheesy fan-film Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation , and a retrospective of Broomall native and Johnny Carson-regular Len Cella's aptly titled Moron Movies . Cinedelphia's main event pays tribute to local filmmaker Don Argott, his producing/life partner, Sheena Joyce (the couple just welcomed a baby)
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | by Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Daily News
The head of Los Angeles' city-county film office has charged that the advertising industry has stepped up pressure on film companies to stage complicated and dangerous stunts for commercials without allowing enough time for preparation. Calling it a "dangerous trend," Entertainment Industry Development Corp. President Cody Cluff called on the advertising industry to give commercial shooters more time to plan for hazardous maneuvers. "It's our feeling that over the past five years or more, advertising agencies have begun to put more and more pressure on commercial production companies to create more complex and detailed stunts and pyrotechnic events in less time, in shorter production cycles and for less cost," Cluff said during a news conference.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Walden is fond of saying that she started a revolution. About 20 years ago, the Camden native founded one of the first cosmetics businesses aimed at black women. Although Flori Roberts developed what is considered the first black cosmetic-product line in 1965, it is Walden who is credited with breaking barriers by getting major department stores to carry her line. "I would not take 'no' for an answer," Walden recalled in a telephone interview from her Brentwood, Calif.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
GRATUITOUS GESTURE A BIT TOO GRAND, SAYS TIPPLER The tippler wasn't tipsy when he gave her a $1,000 tip on a $3.95 gin-and-tonic, says waitress Ruth Bullis. But, the tippler says regardless, he overtipped and wants a refund. No way, says Bullis. Besides, it's already spent. Bullis and her coworkers at Stanford's Restaurant and Bar in Lake Oswego, Ore., say the 50ish gent wasn't even addled when he signed the gratuity-generous credit-card slip in November. Besides, "once someone gives you a tip, that's it," explained Bullis.
NEWS
February 5, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perhaps those visions of Hollywood glitz for humble Norristown were unduly rosy, like most showbiz dreams. For now, the hyped plan to revive the hard-bitten Montgomery County seat with one of the largest movie studios on the East Coast is off the table, replaced by the more pragmatic construction of office space for a janitorial concern and a Pathmark. The latter, aimed at completion early next year, would be the municipality's first new full-service supermarket in a generation.
NEWS
September 15, 1997 | By Frank Greve, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Steven Rea contributed to this article
In the years since Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint scrambled down the presidential faces of Mount Rushmore to flee from bad guys in Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 classic North by Northwest, America's national parks have starred in scores of movies. But the nation's grandest parks generally have earned less than extras - and often nothing - for their unique roles. And Hollywood films shot in national parks, including such blockbusters as Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Star Wars, and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, have grossed more than $3.2 billion.
NEWS
February 19, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A Republican state senator is offering a "gambling-free" alternative to Gov. Rendell's proposal that video poker be legalized and taxed to help students pay for tuition at community colleges and some state schools. Sen. Jeffrey Piccola (R., Dauphin), chairman of the Senate Education Committee, announced a plan yesterday that would provide $140 million to help students attending any college. The money would go to the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency. Piccola would fund the program by eliminating the $75 million tax credit for film companies and cutting in half the amount of aid for some private schools and museums.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1992 | By Ann Kolson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Hollywood is gleefully tallying its record-breaking holiday box office, United Artists Theatres executives are mourning their losses in Upper Darby. The chain's nine-screen United Artists Theatres at 69th Street, which was to have opened amid much fanfare on Nov. 20, remains dark for the second week. The theater did not receive its occupancy permit from Upper Darby in time for the scheduled opening, as all the necessary inspections had not been completed, Don Phillips, director of the township's Department of Licenses and Inspections, said yesterday.
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