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Film Director

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NEWS
February 26, 2013
Alexei German, 74, a Russian film director best known for his works chronicling the Stalinist era in the Soviet Union, died in Moscow on Thursday. His son, Alexei German Jr., said in a blog post Thursday that the filmmaker died of heart failure at a hospital in St. Petersburg. Mr. German came to prominence internationally for his 1983 production My Friend Ivan Lapshin , about a police investigator battling a criminal gang. Authorities blocked the film's release for two years because of its realistic depiction of Soviet life in the wake of the Stalinist terror of the late 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1986 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Movie Critic
Terry Gilliam is game for just about anything. He'll climb up a tree. He'll hang off a big rock. He'll even pretend to fall asleep on a Central Park bench. Anything. Go ahead, name it: Pretend that knobby tree over there is a woman and give it a great big hug. OK. Go straddle that bush. Sure! Whether he's jaunting through a Central Park photography session or relaxing in his Hotel Westbury suite in the first of three weeks of interviews, Gilliam's energy is infectious. He is one happy buckaroo.
NEWS
November 10, 2012
Leonardo Favio, a film director, actor, and singer who was one of Argentina's most enduring cultural figures, died Monday in Buenos Aires after a series of illnesses, the Associated Press reported. Mr. Favio began acting in movies in the 1950s under the direction of the noted Argentine filmmaker Leopoldo Torre Nilsson, and he soon became a star. After he appeared in Nilsson's 1958 release The Kidnapper, he became popularly known as "the Argentine James Dean. " Over the next decade, Mr. Favio continued to appear on screen and also began directing films of his own. In 1965, he directed his first feature-length movie, the semiautobiographical, black-and-white Chronicle of a Lonely Child.
NEWS
January 5, 2013
Sergiu Nicolaescu, 82, a prolific and popular Romanian film director known for his historical epics who also served as a senator, died Thursday of heart and lung complications following surgery for digestive problems, Elias Hospital in Bucharest reported. Mr. Nicolaescu quit politics in December, having been senator for the Social Democracy Party since 1992. He made about 50 movies, and despite his career in politics, continued to direct films, including Orient Express in 2004.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
Swedish actor Erland Josephson, 88, who collaborated with legendary film director Ingmar Bergman in more than 40 films and plays, died Saturday at a Stockholm hospital. The award-winning actor had long battled against Parkinson's disease, said Royal Dramatic Theatre spokeswoman Christina Bjerkander. Mr. Josephson was born into a family of artists in Stockholm in 1923 and would become the actor who had the longest-running collaboration with Bergman. The two first met when Mr. Josephson was just 16 and was an amateur actor in The Merchant of Venice , directed by Bergman.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, 85, a German-born novelist whose fiction was set largely in India and who gained her greatest acclaim as a two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter with the Merchant-Ivory filmmaking team, died Wednesday, April 3, at her home in New York City. She had a pulmonary disorder, said James Ivory, the film director who worked with Mrs. Jhabvala since the early 1960s. Producer Ismail Merchant, director Ivory, and Mrs. Jhabvala formed what would become one of the most enduring creative teams in moviemaking history.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer
There's little question that any list of contemporary pop culture's most beloved fictional characters would have the name "Madea" at or near the top. As played by her creator, show-biz mogul Tyler Perry , Madea - a/k/a the fictional character Mable Simmons - is an elderly, take-no-crap African-American woman who comes off - in a comical way, of course - as more than slightly unhinged. As in, she isn't afraid to threaten gunplay if crossed. Madea is the star of a series of wildly successful films and stage plays, the newest of which, "Madea on the Run," opens a six-day run Tuesday at the Merriam Theater.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
'As you could guess," says film director Sean Evans, "Roger is not afraid to speak his mind. " That unbridled spirit is Roger Waters, cofounder and former front man of Pink Floyd, and, now, codirector with Evans of a documentary on the progressive British band's celebrated theatrical work, The Wall. The film was released this week on BluRay/DVD. Waters was in his 30s when he conceived the rock opera, about the psychotic decay of a fictional rock artist named Pink, drawn in part from Water's own inner turmoil.
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NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
'As you could guess," says film director Sean Evans, "Roger is not afraid to speak his mind. " That unbridled spirit is Roger Waters, cofounder and former front man of Pink Floyd, and, now, codirector with Evans of a documentary on the progressive British band's celebrated theatrical work, The Wall. The film was released this week on BluRay/DVD. Waters was in his 30s when he conceived the rock opera, about the psychotic decay of a fictional rock artist named Pink, drawn in part from Water's own inner turmoil.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer
There's little question that any list of contemporary pop culture's most beloved fictional characters would have the name "Madea" at or near the top. As played by her creator, show-biz mogul Tyler Perry , Madea - a/k/a the fictional character Mable Simmons - is an elderly, take-no-crap African-American woman who comes off - in a comical way, of course - as more than slightly unhinged. As in, she isn't afraid to threaten gunplay if crossed. Madea is the star of a series of wildly successful films and stage plays, the newest of which, "Madea on the Run," opens a six-day run Tuesday at the Merriam Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Don't look for light cinematic fare for the opening Tuesday of the Philadelphia gay film festival qFLIX. Its second annual iteration, which runs through Sunday, will lead with a moody romantic drama, Beautiful Something , set here and shot by local director Joseph Graham. And the weighty stuff continues, with documentaries whose titles speak to global LGBT struggles, among them A Sinner in Mecca andthe savage, Ugandan-made Outed: The Painful Reality . One film being buzzed about in Philadelphia's gay community, however, has a comic streak as wide as the United States: Be Who You Are , a deceptively simple, charming, buoyant documentary to premiere at 7 p.m. Thursday at Prince Music Theater.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a would-be superhero lurking in lots of us. "The Marvel Experience" hopes to exploit that potential in its Philadelphia engagement at Lincoln Financial Field from June 24 to July 5. This first-of-a-kind, highly interactive event is part movie, part electronic arcade and Comic-Con gathering. It aims no less than to reshape touring entertainment for the 21st century. The goal is to please a multimedia, seen-it-all audience that craves to live in the moment. "This isn't a static, museum-style exhibit," said the project's spark plug, Doug Schaer, of Hero Ventures.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
MADRID - Sara Montiel, 85, a famed, sultry-voiced Spanish actress who became the first to also achieve Hollywood stardom, died Monday. Her biographer Peter Villora said Ms. Montiel died at her home in Madrid after passing out. "She was both an actress and singer, but mainly an actress, fulfilling the dream of her life," Villora said. Ms. Montiel was born Maria Antonia Abad in Campo de Criptana in the central region of La Mancha. An acknowledged beauty with an almost husky singing voice, Ms. Montiel starred in more than 50 films, many of them musicals.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, 85, a German-born novelist whose fiction was set largely in India and who gained her greatest acclaim as a two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter with the Merchant-Ivory filmmaking team, died Wednesday, April 3, at her home in New York City. She had a pulmonary disorder, said James Ivory, the film director who worked with Mrs. Jhabvala since the early 1960s. Producer Ismail Merchant, director Ivory, and Mrs. Jhabvala formed what would become one of the most enduring creative teams in moviemaking history.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Alexei German, 74, a Russian film director best known for his works chronicling the Stalinist era in the Soviet Union, died in Moscow on Thursday. His son, Alexei German Jr., said in a blog post Thursday that the filmmaker died of heart failure at a hospital in St. Petersburg. Mr. German came to prominence internationally for his 1983 production My Friend Ivan Lapshin , about a police investigator battling a criminal gang. Authorities blocked the film's release for two years because of its realistic depiction of Soviet life in the wake of the Stalinist terror of the late 1930s.
NEWS
January 5, 2013
Sergiu Nicolaescu, 82, a prolific and popular Romanian film director known for his historical epics who also served as a senator, died Thursday of heart and lung complications following surgery for digestive problems, Elias Hospital in Bucharest reported. Mr. Nicolaescu quit politics in December, having been senator for the Social Democracy Party since 1992. He made about 50 movies, and despite his career in politics, continued to direct films, including Orient Express in 2004.
NEWS
November 10, 2012
Leonardo Favio, a film director, actor, and singer who was one of Argentina's most enduring cultural figures, died Monday in Buenos Aires after a series of illnesses, the Associated Press reported. Mr. Favio began acting in movies in the 1950s under the direction of the noted Argentine filmmaker Leopoldo Torre Nilsson, and he soon became a star. After he appeared in Nilsson's 1958 release The Kidnapper, he became popularly known as "the Argentine James Dean. " Over the next decade, Mr. Favio continued to appear on screen and also began directing films of his own. In 1965, he directed his first feature-length movie, the semiautobiographical, black-and-white Chronicle of a Lonely Child.
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