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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the Ealing Studio comedies to the barbs hurled by the Monty Python troupe, savage attacks on the English class system have been a staple of British screen comedy. Peter Medak's The Ruling Class was made in 1972, but it's not dated because the ruling class is still alive and well. Peter Barnes adapted his own play and gave Peter O'Toole a heavy cross to bear as the 14th Earl of Gurney. The earl thinks he's Jesus Christ and spends some of his time in a trance on the cross he totes around.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The final installment in Krzysztof Kieslowski's Three Colors trilogy, 1994's Red, showing Saturday at the Film Forum on a double bill with Max Ophuls' The Earrings of Madame de . . ., stands alone. It's a wise, rueful study of the way people's lives cross in unexpected ways. Irene Jacob stars as a fashion model who becomes involved with an embittered, disaffected retired judge (a brilliant Jean-Louis Trintignant), who passes his time electronically eavesdropping on his neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A corner cigar shop in Brooklyn - pre-cigar chic, with not a single A-type e-commerce 24-year-old millionaire in sight - is the setting for Smoke, filmmaker Wayne Wang's loose and lovely 1995 collaboration with the novelist Paul Auster. Harvey Keitel stars as Auggie Wren, proprietor of the unassuming neighborhood tobacco shop - and a closet photographer, poet and muser who meets and greets a parade of customers each day. Among them: an Auster-like novelist (William Hurt); a student (Harold Perrineau Jr.)
NEWS
April 9, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a dozen experts on the controversial issue of animals in scientific research will take part in a three-day film forum beginning tonight at Drexel University. Among the participants will be Frederick Wiseman, the independent documentary filmmaker, who will show his 1974 film Primate, which deals with research at the Yerkes Primate Research Center of Emory University. Also on tonight's panel will be Frederick King, Yerkes' director. Another highlight of the forum will be Friday's first public showing of Unnecessary Fuss, a 29-minute documentary made from more than 70 hours of videotape stolen by members of the Animal Liberation Front from the Head Injury Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1994 | By Donald True Van Deusen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Film Forum - Philadelphia's sanctuary of classic movies - will be giving lovers of the big screen something to look forward to in 1995 with its just- released schedule of films that begin next weekend. As always, the program menu features a combination platter of two movies every Saturday night, usually one foreign and one American film for a single $4.50 admission charge. They are all classics, or what one author described as "forgotten films to remember. " The scheduled films range from such well-known classics as the surrealistic L'Age d'Or and Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 (the Jan. 7 season openers)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Your assignment is to sell 25,000 percent of a Broadway play to various dumb investors and then get out of paying them back by producing something that is a cast-iron guarantee to flop. How about Springtime for Hitler with the stage filled with cavorting Nazis? That's what producer Max Bialystock (played by Zero Mostel) dreams up as his ticket to the good life in Rio in the film The Producers. Of course, the scam backfires when the play becomes a smash hit. The 1968 comedy - an inspired piece of insanity - marked the directing debut of Mel Brooks.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How fitting that one of the best films ever made about a painter happens to be about one of the best painters who ever put brush to canvas. Rembrandt (1936) stars Charles Laughton in a jolly, somber, exuberant and reflective performance that embraces the brilliance and shadow of the Dutch master's canvases. Focusing on the artist's extravagant talents and spending, the loss of his beloved wife Saskia and also his artistic reputation, the film by Alexander Korda lacks the splendor of his prior collaboration with Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The passage of time, which Casablanca's music so memorably celebrates, has only added to the stature of the film and the achievement of its stars. Humphrey Bogart did his part under most unusual circumstances - his third wife, Maryo Methot, a jealous alcoholic, phoned him constantly on the set to accuse him of having an affair with Ingrid Bergman. The accusation wasn't true, but the sparks between Bogie and Bergman on the screen make Methot's suspicions understandable. Incidentally, you can thank Bergman's schedule for the fact that the indelible "As Time Goes By" stayed in the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With Woody Allen all over the newsstands, and his Husbands and Wives all over the country, the folks at Film Forum/Philadelphia have presciently booked a more innocent Allen endeavor: What's Up, Tiger Lily?, Allen's quasi- filmmaking debut. In 1966, three years before the release of his first feature, Take the Money and Run, the nebbishy New York comedian took a print of a 1964 Toho Films release, Key of Keys, and redubbed and re-edited it to hilarious effect. An ersatz James Bond-thriller from Japan, Allen and his cohorts (including first wife Louise Lasser)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the home for orphaned girls, the raffishly handsome young medical inspector strolls down the dormitory and dispenses his cure for every minor and major malady: castor oil. But when it comes to the many romantic and financial afflictions in his own life, this is one physician who cannot heal himself. His manful attempts to do so are at the warm heart of Vittorio de Sica's Teresa Venerdi, which is playing at the Film Forum this weekend. De Sica made this charming comedy in 1941 and, besides its own merit, the movie offers fascinating glimpses and hints of what was to come later in his career.
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BUSINESS
October 11, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis and Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Roxy Theater has gone dark. But not for long. The Rittenhouse Square-area twinplex, which closed Friday - after 15 years under lawyer-turned-movie-house-operator Bernard Nearey - has a new tenant waiting in the wings. The Philadelphia Film Society, the nonprofit group behind the Philadelphia Film Festival, has secured a 16-year lease with the Roxy's landlord, John Ciccone, who owns multiple properties on the block. The PFS is set to move into the Roxy, at 2023 Sansom St., on Jan. 1. Andrew Greenblatt, the Society's executive director, said Tuesday that upgrades will be made - new seating, new screens - and that the theater will be equipped with a digital projection system.
NEWS
October 18, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Moviedom's master of the weird and disturbing will be the center of attention at 7 p.m. Monday at "Inside the Mind of Alfred Hitchcock," a film forum to be held at the County Theater, 20 E. State St., Doylestown Film clips from Hitchcock's movies The 39 Steps, Shadow of a Doubt, Vertigo and The Birds will be shown, as well as taped interviews of Hitchcock himself. At 7 p.m. Wednesday, a screening of Rear Window and a discussion of the movie will be held. The movie is a thriller starring James Stewart as a wheelchair-bound photographer playing detective with his across-the-courtyard neighbor as murder suspect.
NEWS
April 10, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
David Grossman, the beloved impresario who delighted generations of Philadelphians with selections from his archive of rare films, died yesterday at the Mount Laurel Convalescent Center after suffering a stroke in late March. He was 71. For more than 40 years, the man with a W.C. Fields face atop an Edward G. Robinson body showed movies at various venues in the region, most recently at Film Forum/Philadelphia, where he had hosted a repertory series since 1989. The prints were from a personal collection of more than 1,000 titles, ranging from the Depression-era romance Berkeley Square (1933)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The way Jules Dassin was forced to leave this country in the poisonous atmosphere surrounding the '50s hearings of the House UnAmerican Activities Committee was a crime. But at least it yielded a scintillating film that is rightly regarded as the granddaddy of the crime caper movie. Tom Cruise's high-wire break-in in the Mission: Impossible film has nothing on the crackling tension of the celebrated robbery in Rififi. Dassin went to Paris and shot Rififi in 1954. He cast himself under the alias Perlo Vita as one of four thieves who pull off the heist in a silent, 28-minute sequence that has been endlessly imitated in other movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The final installment in Krzysztof Kieslowski's Three Colors trilogy, 1994's Red, showing Saturday at the Film Forum on a double bill with Max Ophuls' The Earrings of Madame de . . ., stands alone. It's a wise, rueful study of the way people's lives cross in unexpected ways. Irene Jacob stars as a fashion model who becomes involved with an embittered, disaffected retired judge (a brilliant Jean-Louis Trintignant), who passes his time electronically eavesdropping on his neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A corner cigar shop in Brooklyn - pre-cigar chic, with not a single A-type e-commerce 24-year-old millionaire in sight - is the setting for Smoke, filmmaker Wayne Wang's loose and lovely 1995 collaboration with the novelist Paul Auster. Harvey Keitel stars as Auggie Wren, proprietor of the unassuming neighborhood tobacco shop - and a closet photographer, poet and muser who meets and greets a parade of customers each day. Among them: an Auster-like novelist (William Hurt); a student (Harold Perrineau Jr.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sometimes - against all the odds - the right film wins in the controversial best-foreign-film category at the Oscars. It happened one Academy Awards night, in 1976, when the heavily touted Cousin, Cousine and Seven Beauties lost out to Jean-Jacques Annaud's Black and White in Color. Annaud's wryly observed and brilliant anti-war film is set in colonial Africa in 1914. French and German colonists live amiably and share an utter disdain for the natives. The arrival of the news of the outbreak of World War I in this outpost changes everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How fitting that one of the best films ever made about a painter happens to be about one of the best painters who ever put brush to canvas. Rembrandt (1936) stars Charles Laughton in a jolly, somber, exuberant and reflective performance that embraces the brilliance and shadow of the Dutch master's canvases. Focusing on the artist's extravagant talents and spending, the loss of his beloved wife Saskia and also his artistic reputation, the film by Alexander Korda lacks the splendor of his prior collaboration with Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The release of Odd Man Out in 1947 was pivotal to two great film careers. It moved Carol Reed to the front rank of directors, a status he would reaffirm with his masterly The Third Man, and it liberated James Mason from matinee-idol roles. At the time, Mason's Johnny McQueen was a stunning revelation of the talent and promise that he was to so richly fulfill. In this brilliant nightmare of a movie, McQueen is an IRA gunrunner who breaks out of jail. To fund his operations he plans a payroll heist.
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