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Film Industry

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1993 | By Ryan Murphy, FOR THE INQUIRER Also contributing to this story was the Los Angeles Times
"It's absurd!" blasts Louis Malle. "They keep telling you it's not censorship, but clearly it is. To release a film in this country with an NC-17 rating is a kind of kiss of death. You won't get a wide release, some newspapers won't even carry your advertisement. So what can you do? You're forced to make changes to fit into the system. " The director pauses, searches for further fuel for his tirade, and then can only laugh when he repeats himself. "I tell you, the NC-17 rating is absurd!"
NEWS
October 2, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's lawmakers are proposing to slash the state's film tax credit, and the local film industry is crying foul. The Pennsylvania film tax credit, begun in 2004, covers certain production expenses for state-sited films, TV series, and shows. Funds for the credit stand at $75 million, but in cash-strapped Pennsylvania, budgeteers are talking about slicing it to $49 million, according to the Greater Philadelphia Film Office. It is the first time a dollar amount has been put on the proposed cut. "That's just crazy," said Sharon Pinkenson, executive director of the film office.
NEWS
March 30, 2010 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Umbrella-toting pedestrians fought the rain yesterday on South 21st Street, across from two orange cranes looming over a brownstone at Delancey Place. Then they stopped, turned around, and retraced their routes. Again and again. A production company was shooting a television pilot for NBC inside the house on the corner. As technicians on the cranes shined lights through the windows, the actor Jimmy Smits was emoting for a one-hour untitled drama, in which he plays a Supreme Court justice named Garza who returns to private practice so he can pursue cases involving constitutional law. The shoot has given more than 100 film-industry locals jobs for about three weeks.
REAL_ESTATE
January 17, 2010 | By Christine Bahls FOR THE INQUIRER
For years, Faye Sevilla Smith, a wardrobe supervisor in the film industry, lived life on the road. Though she and her husband, John, had a base in Los Angeles and, for a brief time, in New Orleans, the two called home wherever a film's location took them. For some of that time, John Smith, 35, was working on his dissertation for a doctorate in economics. Then, three years ago, Rutgers University in Camden offered him an associate professor's position, and Sevilla Smith, also 35, became pregnant with their son, Max. The couple needed a permanent address.
NEWS
November 14, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Since the release of La Balance four years ago, Bob Swaim has been what Hollywood calls a hot director. But the truth is that he first got into movies just to stay warm. The Paris winter of 1965 is remembered with some feeling by Swaim for its exceptional ferocity. He was a poor anthropology student caught up by Hemingway visions of the romance of being an American in Paris. The reality was chillingly different. "It was freezing, and I had so little money that I couldn't even appreciate how cheap it was to live in the city back then," said Swaim with a rueful laugh.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's the climax of Major Saab, a feature produced by and starring Amitabh Bachchan, an icon of the Indian film industry, the leading man in the 1970s and 1980s. In a comeback role as a major at a military academy, Bachchan has just taken a cadre of cadets past the ed goons guarding the mansion of an underworld king. Their mission is not political, but romantic. Rifles cocked, the cadets watch as the gangster's son circles a fire, seven times, with a woman hidden under the folds of a pink sari.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The walls of Le Julyann, a neighborhood cafe, are covered with storefront pictures that look to be as old as photography itself. Fish peddlers and cheese merchants sip their espressos before switching to young red wine. And the clerk at the bar dispenses Gitane cigarettes with the deftness of a blackjack dealer. But hold on. What's that Jurassic Park pinball machine doing in here? Denise Marraccin, the manager, flashed a smile of resignation. It was her children's idea, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1997 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As dusk falls over a drab city street, the marquee of the New Age Cinema switches on its lights and glows like a beacon. Students from the nearby University of Tehran mill about expectantly, clutching tickets they've bought for 2,000 rials - about 50 cents. There is precious little entertainment for the youth of Tehran - no discos, few cafes, hardly any music. But, ah yes, there are movies, plentiful, cheap and of a quality that is increasingly winning Iran international acclaim.
NEWS
June 25, 2008 | By Matt Blanchard FOR THE INQUIRER
While Philadelphia celebrates most any piece of Hollywood glamour it can get, few have noticed another globally important movie industry making inroads here. It's not Hollywood, nor is it India's Bollywood, but rather Nollywood - the freewheeling and wildly prolific West African cinema nicknamed for its base in Nigeria. With annual sales estimated at more than $200 million, Nollywood is the world's third-largest film industry, and may be home to some of its fastest filmmakers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1992 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
"With a good film, the nationality is secondary," said the writer- director at the time of the 1983 Cannes Film Festival. "The film is its own country. " The writer-director was an Australian, Peter Weir, and his film was The Year of Living Dangerously, set in Indonesia in 1965 and co-starring Mel Gibson, who was born in America and raised in Australia, and the very American Sigourney Weaver, with an erratic English accent. Plenty of nationalities there. Weir has since directed films in the United States, including Witness (1985)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2013
D IANE HEERY, 58, and Jason Loftus, 38, of West Deptford, N.J., are partners in Heery Casting, a full-service casting firm on Cumberland Street near Almond in Kensington. It provides the entertainment industry with talent for film, TV and commercials. The firm received an Emmy nomination for outstanding casting for its work on the 2012 miniseries "Political Animals" on the USA Network. The awards will be presented Sept. 22. I spoke with Heery. Q: How'd you get into the biz?
SPORTS
January 11, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers winger Scott Hartnell has a cameo - and some lines - in the recent movie This Is 40 and says working in the film industry is more difficult than he had imagined. "I'll tell you one thing - I have a lot more respect for movie stars and directors and people like that," Hartnell said Wednesday after an informal practice in Voorhees. "We were on the set for 16 hours. It was a really, really long day for the minute or minute and a half we were in the movie. " Hartnell is in a scene with Ian Laperriere, the Flyers' director of player development, and former Flyers James van Riemsdyk and Matt Carle.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Daniel Estrin, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - The Mideast conflict has done little to help Israel's image in the world, but the way local filmmakers deal critically with the Israel-Palestinian issue has won wide international praise - and this year, recognition from the top of the movie industry. Two Israeli-produced documentaries about the conflict have been shortlisted for possible nomination in this year's Academy Awards. Few Israeli films have contended in the Best Documentary category before. The shortlisted films represent rare recognition of foreign entrants in a category dominated by American productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | Freelance
STICK ON a name tag, grab a beer and start talking movies with other creative folks as the 21-Day Filmmaking Competition kicks off at this networking event, Project Twenty1's largest annual program to promote artistic collaboration in the film industry. The Philadelphia-based nonprofit's competition is like "the Olympics of short-film contests," said Matt Contant, Twenty1's artistic director. Since 2006, Project Twenty1 has coordinated screenings, festivals and educational programs that create opportunities for artists and support the local economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2012 | By Dan Gross
M. Night Shyamalan and wife Bhavna hosted a party at their Chester County home Saturday to honor Sharon Pinkenson, head of the Greater Philadelphia Film Office, on her 20 years running the local film commission. Overbrook native superstar Will Smith and son Jaden , who are in the area starring in Shyamalan's "After Earth," helped celebrate as did locally raised actresses Kim Delaney of "Army Wives" and Rebecca Creskoff of "Hung. " Phylicia Rashad , who is in town shooting the NBC pilot "Do No Harm," (now on location at the School District of Philadelphia headquarters)
NEWS
March 8, 2012
Ralph McQuarrie, 82, the artist who developed the look of the first Star Wars trilogy's signature characters, sets, and spaceships, died Saturday at his home in Berkeley, Calif. John Scoleri, coauthor of a book on Mr. McQuarrie's art, told the Los Angeles Times that he had suffered from Parkinson's disease. In a statement on the official Star Wars website, George Lucas said that Mr. McQuarrie was the first person he hired to help him envision what would become some of the top-grossing movies of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
IT WAS A dark and possibly stormy night. OK, it probably wasn't stormy; Daniel Radcliffe can't remember. But the "Harry Potter" star was in bed expecting to drift off to sleep when he started hearing strange sounds coming from inside his flat. What's a former boy wizard to do? He popped up out of bed and grabbed "the nearest, bluntest thing" and charged what could have possibly been vengeful spirits from the netherworld. "I literally came out of my room brandishing a cricket bat [bellowing]
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By ROGER MOORE, The Orlando Sentinel
ORLANDO, Fla. - Michael Fassbender's name seems to pop up most any time a new film project is announced. "Prometheus," Ridley Scott's prequel to "Alien"? Jim Jarmusch's new vampire movie? Danny Boyle's "Trance"? A film industry hungry for a hunky, young leading man with action-hero potential is taking a hard look at Fassbender. He was Rochester in the recent "Jane Eyre," a Roman soldier on the run in ancient Britain in last year's "Centurion. " And this weekend, he is Erik Lehnsherr, the tormented Holocaust survivor who will become Magneto in "X-Men: First Class.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2011 | By MIN LEE, Associated Press
HONG KONG - Some of Asia's top filmmakers screened their new movies to kick off the 35th Hong Kong International Film Festival yesterday, although the mood was subdued because of Japan's earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disasters. Japan's crisis cast doubt on whether its actors and directors would attend the Hong Kong festival. Popular Japanese director Shunji Iwai, a native of the hard-hit city Sendai, has canceled his appearance at the Asian premiere of his first English-language movie, "Vampire.
NEWS
February 26, 2011
Gov. Corbett has joked about how he resembles the late comedy actor Leslie Nielsen. While Corbett is clearly the straight man, it was good to see the governor back a tax credit for the film industry. The tax credits help attract film crews and Hollywood stars to the state. That helps create thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in spending. Corbett approved roughly $49 million in tax credits for 60 film, television, and commercial productions in the state. Former Gov. Edward G. Rendell had approved the credits before he left office, but they were held up for review by the Corbett administration.
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