CollectionsFilm School
IN THE NEWS

Film School

ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When it comes to historical films, Hollywood is notorious for never letting facts get in the way of a good story. When the subject is alive or is survived by family and friends who can defend his or her reputation, a firestorm of controversy - and free publicity - is guaranteed. Just ask Stephen J. Rivele and Christopher Wilkinson, the Philadelphia-born screenwriters who won a well-merited Oscar nomination for their inspired script for Oliver Stone's Nixon. Aspiring writers and interested moviegoers will have the chance to do just that at a Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema seminar the pair will host tomorrow afternoon.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | by John Hartl, Special to the Daily News
For nearly a decade now, laserdiscs have used extra audio tracks to provide commentary by filmmakers, actors and critics. These special discs, usually priced at $80 to $125 apiece, have been restricted mostly to established classics on the order of Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane. " But this week the Criterion Collection is offering a timely, lower-priced exception: a $50 disc of John Singleton's 1991 critical- commercial smash, "Boyz N the Hood. " Just 24, Singleton recently displaced Welles as the youngest filmmaker ever to win an Academy Award nomination for best director.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Since their very beginnings, movies have offered a refuge in fantasy for the masses, and - at least in Hollywood - it's an axiom that audiences don't want to see films portraying the drudgery and dullness they are trying to escape. Even in the greatest American films about poverty - such as John Ford's The Grapes of Wrath - there is optimism about the human spirit, and the power of determination and perseverance against the odds. Henry Fonda's Tom Joad is a quintessential American hero and a man who would shake his head in dismay at Macabea, the ill-starred protagonist in Suzana Amaral's Hour of the Star.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Not to put too fine a point on it, Angry Harvest is a masterpiece. Agnieszka Holland's film, which deserves to be as celebrated as The Diary of Anne Frank, enjoys a belated premiere tomorrow night at the Gershman YM/ YWHA. Though Harvest reaped Holland a 1985 Oscar nomination for best foreign film, the Warsaw-born, Prague-trained writer/director is remembered in this country as the scenarist of Anna and Danton. The least well-known and perhaps most accomplished of postwar, Eastern-bloc filmmakers, who include Milos Forman, Ivan Passer (with whom she went to film school)
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | by Kathleen Shea, Daily News Staff Writer
When comedian Steve White was a sophomore coming up at Roosevelt High on Long Island and Eddie Murphy was a mighty senior there, White wasn't dreaming about how maybe one day he'd enter his own movie at the Cannes Film Festival. "No," he said, laughing, "I was talking about going to Arthur Andersen (the giant accounting firm). "I didn't want to be one of the regular knuckleheads. I wanted to have a future. I was thinking about having a Lamborghini. " Thanks to a college English teacher who told him he just couldn't see White pushing a pencil for a living, the Murphy connection and his own talent, the only numbers White is crunching these days are his own. White, 26, nailed down his accounting degree at Adelphi University in Garden City by day while developing his comedy career by night in Long Island and Jersey clubs.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | By Pat Duffy and Liz Leshin, Special to The Inquirer
Film censors in China banned Peng Xiaolian's Women's Story for what they called "morally deficient female characters. " Chinese film critics said "it was a bad movie, that it was too melodramatic, that the women weren't beautiful and that they cried too much," the 37-year-old director recalled recently, sitting in her tiny apartment in Greenwich Village. Once abroad, however, Women's Story, which shows how such feudal influences as forced marriage and compulsory abortion still pervade women's lives in rural China, fared much better.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By Jaik Sanders, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For whatever reason, Dizzy Gillespie looks almost comfortable on the same wall as the Sex Pistols. The Beatles mingle with Judas Priest. And Blair Elliot fingers his goatee, smiling. Elliot, 32, owns Doylestown's Siren Records, Bucks County's primary portal to vinyl records, underground music and independent-music culture. "We find a nice balance with the people who come here," he said, standing midstore in an off-white Sun Records T-shirt and shorts. "Some are kids, amateur DJs looking for indie hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been six years in the making, but Philadelphia filmmaker Rel Dowdell will finally premiere his debut, Train Ride, his straight-to-video feature film, tonight at International House. Dowdell, 31, a graduate of Central High and Fisk University, was the first African American to win the short-subject grand prize, for Train Ride, at Boston University's film school. Dowdell teaches screenwriting at Philadelphia Community College and Boston University. Question: What were your favorite movies growing up?
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He seemed to enjoy giving orders to Sister Beatrice. "Take one step at a time. Move very slowly. Take another step. Pause. Take another. Good. OK. Quiet. Action. " At his command, the elderly nun, leaning on her walker, moved down the long marble hallway. "OK. Sweet. Cut. " Manoj Night Shyamalan was in the motherhouse of the Sisters of Mercy in Merion, telling a small group of nuns what to do. They listened obediently. It was almost as if he had turned the tables on his old teachers, except for one thing.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
WHEN TRANSIT cops yanked unarmed Oscar Grant from a BART train on New Years Eve 2008 and then restrained and killed him, the incident floored a young filmmaker named Ryan Coogler. It's not hard to see why - both Coogler and Grant are African-American, were born in 1986 and grew up in the Oakland area. "That could have been me, very easily," says Coogler, who followed the case through film school (the shooter did jail time, though not much), saw the protests, the rioting, the politicized rhetoric, and felt in his heart that the right movie would do more to illuminate Grant's story than any protest or argument or news account.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|