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Film School

NEWS
August 1, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Michelangelo Antonioni, the Italian filmmaker celebrated for his enigmatic 1966 masterpiece, Blow-Up, died at his home in Rome on Monday only hours after the passing of his Swedish counterpart, Ingmar Bergman. Mr. Antonioni was 94. During his heyday in the '60s the Ferrara-born director, whose major theme was the spiritual poverty of the wealthy, was known for his ravishingly beautiful studies of alienation that often had the effect of alienating audiences. Mr. Antonioni's stark trilogy of ennui - L'Avventura (1960)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been six years in the making, but Philadelphia filmmaker Rel Dowdell will finally premiere his debut, Train Ride, his straight-to-video feature film, tonight at International House. Dowdell, 31, a graduate of Central High and Fisk University, was the first African American to win the short-subject grand prize, for Train Ride, at Boston University's film school. Dowdell teaches screenwriting at Philadelphia Community College and Boston University. Question: What were your favorite movies growing up?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | By Michael Harrington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Novelist Norman Mailer has always been audacious in his endeavors, as shown by his 1970 cinema-verite thriller Maidstone. Maidstone was Mailer's third film, part of a project to destroy Hollywood by making movies using multiple cameras simultaneously filming improvised scenes based on bare outlines. His plan was to later edit the hours of film into coherence, much as he would write a novel. The film was shot in the Hamptons on Long Island over four days in the violence-haunted summer of 1968, with a cast of socialites, amateurs and actors, including Rip Torn and Harris Yulin.
NEWS
October 6, 2004 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit corporation has purchased the tattered but still grand 1925 Bryn Mawr Theater, in hopes of replicating the success of restored art houses in towns such as Doylestown and Ambler. Renamed the Bryn Mawr Film Institute, the reborn movie palace will be half-theater, half-school, institute president Juliet Goodfriend said at a news conference yesterday. It will show first-run independent and foreign films similar to those at Center City's Ritz Theatres. It will also provide education programs in filmmaking and cinema analysis for students at local colleges, Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Villanova, as well as classes for children in grade school.
NEWS
August 9, 2003 | By Larry Lewis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charges that Cinekyd film school founder Robert J. Clark Jr. spanked and corrupted children grew yesterday as police filed more than a dozen accusations. An expanded affidavit recorded with the Hatboro court of District Justice Paul N. Leo outlined complaints against Clark from 17 people. Former students, their parents, and even social workers who said they had treated people traumatized by Clark's alleged behavior were included. One of them - a man who said he was a Cinekyd student in the mid-1970s - said Clark had sexually molested him 20 times.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
Unlike other directors of movies based on comic books, Bryan Singer has never been a big fan of the genre. As a kid, he preferred Captain Kirk to Captain America. Yet the boyish director from Princeton Township, N.J., helped turn superheroes into a serious business for Hollywood three years ago, when his "X-Men" surprised everyone and earned huge box-office bucks, grossing $54 million on its opening weekend. Singer likes to think it's because he focused on the human side of the "X-Men" stories.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
These are tough times for Hollywood - revenue is down, movies are bad, and D.C. politicians are hammering studios for pitching sleaze to kids. To politicians, the industry has responded with outraged denunciations of creeping censorship and indignant expressions of their First Amendment freedoms. It would be far easier to sympathize with their position if we didn't routinely have to sit through crap gobs like "Urban Legends: Final Cut. " Here's a movie that represents precisely what Washington says is wrong with Hollywood - a trashy production whose only purpose is to offer up grotesque R-rated violence to a teen audience.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By Jaik Sanders, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For whatever reason, Dizzy Gillespie looks almost comfortable on the same wall as the Sex Pistols. The Beatles mingle with Judas Priest. And Blair Elliot fingers his goatee, smiling. Elliot, 32, owns Doylestown's Siren Records, Bucks County's primary portal to vinyl records, underground music and independent-music culture. "We find a nice balance with the people who come here," he said, standing midstore in an off-white Sun Records T-shirt and shorts. "Some are kids, amateur DJs looking for indie hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The cheerfully subversive spirit of Yana's Friends is defined by a bizarre twist on that hopeful '60s exhortation "Make love, not war. " As Scud missiles rain down on Tel Aviv during the Persian Gulf War, a couple engages in energetic sex while wearing gas masks. This explains the unusually heavy breathing and brightens Arik Kaplun's engaging serio-comedy. His characters are Russian immigrants who have flooded into Israel in the years before Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait. And these newcomers find things so tough that they face life more in desperation than aspiration.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | by Scott Heller, For the Daily News
Laugh at Long Island if you like. Eric Mendelsohn, the writer and director of the poignant new film "Judy Berlin," has found unexpected poetry in the suburban cul-de-sacs that most movies only mock. Gawk at Gwyneth, eyeball Julia, or stand in awe of Meryl's acting chops. Mendelsohn thinks that Barbara Barrie is a true national treasure, "one of America's finest living actresses," who just doesn't get enough to do these days. Born, raised and happy to keep visiting his parents in Old Bethpage, Mendelsohn won the best-director prize at last year's Sundance Festival for "Judy Berlin.
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