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Film School

NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By Jaik Sanders, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For whatever reason, Dizzy Gillespie looks almost comfortable on the same wall as the Sex Pistols. The Beatles mingle with Judas Priest. And Blair Elliot fingers his goatee, smiling. Elliot, 32, owns Doylestown's Siren Records, Bucks County's primary portal to vinyl records, underground music and independent-music culture. "We find a nice balance with the people who come here," he said, standing midstore in an off-white Sun Records T-shirt and shorts. "Some are kids, amateur DJs looking for indie hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The cheerfully subversive spirit of Yana's Friends is defined by a bizarre twist on that hopeful '60s exhortation "Make love, not war. " As Scud missiles rain down on Tel Aviv during the Persian Gulf War, a couple engages in energetic sex while wearing gas masks. This explains the unusually heavy breathing and brightens Arik Kaplun's engaging serio-comedy. His characters are Russian immigrants who have flooded into Israel in the years before Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait. And these newcomers find things so tough that they face life more in desperation than aspiration.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | by Scott Heller, For the Daily News
Laugh at Long Island if you like. Eric Mendelsohn, the writer and director of the poignant new film "Judy Berlin," has found unexpected poetry in the suburban cul-de-sacs that most movies only mock. Gawk at Gwyneth, eyeball Julia, or stand in awe of Meryl's acting chops. Mendelsohn thinks that Barbara Barrie is a true national treasure, "one of America's finest living actresses," who just doesn't get enough to do these days. Born, raised and happy to keep visiting his parents in Old Bethpage, Mendelsohn won the best-director prize at last year's Sundance Festival for "Judy Berlin.
NEWS
February 8, 2000 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As the son of a doctor, M. Night Shyamalan briefly considered a medical career. But by age 11, he was making movies with the family camera in the back yard of their home in Penn Valley. And in his graduation yearbook at Episcopal Academy in 1988, he listed film as his life goal. Yesterday, Shyamalan, now widely known as the writer and director of The Sixth Sense, returned to his alma mater to talk about his success, taking questions from 600 sixth through 12th graders. "As a kid, I loved Jaws and Raiders of the Lost Ark. I wanted to make those kinds of movies," Shyamalan said.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A month before a pair of former Penn State film-school students wrapped up filming a feature called The Hall Monitor, two teenagers at a high school in Littleton, Colo., shot and killed 13 people at the school. After the initial horror of the incident sank in, the filmmakers - Kevin Hartman of Audubon and Shawn Gioiosa of Altoona - felt another kind of dread: Who would distribute their movie now? Their fear turned out to be justified. Despite extensive efforts to market their satire on cinematic violence, Hartman, the film's director, and Gioiosa, the screenwriter, still don't have a deal - though they haven't given up on getting one. They know it's a tough sell: The Hall Monitor features a gun-toting pseudo-hero who keeps the high school corridors clear with a .44 Magnum.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1987 lingo, "The Wood" could be described as "stupid. " Jump ahead a dozen years and you would call it "phat. " The film takes a refreshing look at hip-hop culture in the '80s, undying friendships, and man's eternal fear of wedded bliss. Think "Wonder Years" with a lot more soul and a lot less white boys. The film, directed by Rick Famuyiwa, centers around three childhood friends who reminisce about growing up in Inglewood, Calif. Roland (Taye Diggs) gets last-minute jitters on his wedding day and disappears several hours before the ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Do not be wedded forever To fear, yoked eternally To brutishness. The horizon leans forward, Offering you space to place new steps of change. - Maya Angelou - From "On the Pulse of Morning," delivered by the poet at President Clinton's 1993 inauguration ceremony. In her wrenching feature Down in the Delta, Maya Angelou offers a scene in a grimy Chicago pawn shop that evokes the stubborn hope of the lines she read moments after President Clinton began his first term of office on a windy January morning in 1993.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | by Denene Millner, New York Daily News
And he fell in love, and he got turned out and he dropped everything he was doing in the summer of 1995 to write a movie about it - a welcome cleanser for his soul. OK. "Turned out" is, as Chris Cherot puts it, a bit "harsh. " The turning out, he insists was "mutual. " But he was, nonetheless, deeply affected - so much so that this NYU film school dropout/self-described homeless guy put finger to laptop and created "Hav Plenty," his personal paean to buppie love gone awry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
One of the emptier buzzwords of the '90s is the use of closure to describe a stage of healing in the face of shattering loss. It takes only moments in the company of the parents in Spike Lee's extraordinary and wrenching 4 Little Girls to realize that their shared grief is beyond such solace. They've lived with it for more than three decades, but the pain etched into their faces suggests the tragedy might have happened a few hours ago. Lee's wisest decision is to make the scope of their bereavement the centerpiece of his documentary.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After weeks of politicians posturing, editors editorializing, and commentators commenting, the people of North Penn got their first look last night at a controversial documentary film about last year's school board election here. When the lights came up, the audience of about 350 at Marjeanes Caterers applauded for about half a minute. And then the filmmaker, Ginny Reticker of New York, faced her audience - supporters and critics. New School Order, which will be shown at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah next week, was probably not an enjoyable film for most of this audience, because it is a documentary of a community in conflict.
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