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NEWS
June 10, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
On paper, "The Presidio" must have sounded great. Think of it: team two hot properties, Mark Harmon and Sean Connery (especially hot now that he's an Oscar winner), in a hot genre, the mismatched cop picture. Throw in a love interest in the person of Meg Ryan, sign up an experienced action director, Peter Hyams, and set it all in the eminently picturesque locale of San Francisco. On film, "The Presidio" stinks. Well, maybe "stinks" isn't the right word. This film is too bland and predictable to emit any smell at all. The Presidio is a large military base within the 'Frisco city limits.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Indian government has reversed itself and tentatively agreed to allow a British crew to film a controversial movie adaptation of the best-selling novel The City of Joy in Calcutta. Before getting approval, however, the production company was required to hire Sunil Gangopadhyaya, a well-known Indian writer, to serve as script consultant. According to P. Upendra, Indian minister for information and broadcasting, the script will be revised with Gangopadhyaya's help so that "no portion would offend the sentiments of the people of Calcutta.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | by Ian Spelling, Special to the Daily News
From the moment he heard that "Next Generation" would warp from television to the silver screen, Patrick Stewart believed "Generations" should be a transitional film involving as many original "Trek" cast members as possible. Unfortunately, "Next Gen's" formidable Captain Picard was pretty much alone in his thinking. "A lot of my colleagues didn't share this point of view," the actor said during a phone conversation from the Manhattan set of "Jeffrey," his newest film. But that didn't stop Stewart from lobbying the producers.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Get ready to roll those tumblin' dice and earn some satisfaction. The super-sized, 90-minute-long "Rolling Stones at the MAX" concert film will be rocking in Philadelphia after all, officially opening May 21 at the Franklin Institute's Tuttleman Omniverse Theater after two weeks of previews. Shot in the wraparound, 70mm IMAX film process during the 1990 European run of the Stones' "Steel Wheels" concert, the $10 million production offers an intense, larger-than-life perspective to their show.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Louis Malle's Au revoir, les enfants (Goodbye, Children) begins and ends with a farewell. At the outset - in a platform scene replayed in World War II by countless sundered families and parted lovers - a mother puts her deeply unhappy 12- year-old son aboard the train that will take him from Paris to the safety of a provincial boarding school. By the time that Au revoir, les enfants reaches its heartbreaking last goodbye, we understand that this is a journey that has actually lasted 40 years for Louis Malle.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In one of the most chilling scenes in the landmark Holocaust documentary Shoah, Claude Lanzmann interviewed a group of now-aging Polish farmers who had plowed their fields up to the barbed wire of the concentration camp at Treblinka. The intervening years had done nothing to diminish their almost jovial anti-Semitism. Lanzmann's incomparable and monumental film went beyond the victims and their Nazi persecutors to ask some very pertinent questions of the bystanders. Namely, what - if anything - did you do while your neighbors were being loaded onto the trains?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1990 | By Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
Every so often, like shooting stars, a few Oscars tumble from the firmament of Hollywood's glib production values and huge salaries onto small pictures and their unpretentious casts. Last night, such awards fell to Daniel Day-Lewis and Brenda Fricker for their exquisite performances in the Irish import "My Left Foot," and the two lit up the sky briefly with their open surprise at being chosen best actor and best supporting actress. Those categories usually belong to America's rhinestone royalty, those insta-faces who show up on "Entertainment Tonight" and in the supermarket tabloids, whose bodies are draped in finely cut evening clothes from only the best designers.
NEWS
October 6, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the middle of The Men's Club, Stockard Channing bashes one of the members on the head with a frying pan. No gesture could be more fitting for a film that is, in every sense, consciousness-lowering. Before Channing strikes a blow for the audience, Leonard Michaels, here adapting his novel, regales us with the kind of speeches you dread hearing from the next bar stool near closing time. After it - in a suitably crack- brained development - the men adjourn to a brothel, where they are greeted with solace and understanding as well as sex. Michaels even calls it a "house of affections.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
It had to be fun to be a Hollywood mogul when movies were king. In the Old Hollywood, cigar-chomping guys, most with pot bellies and Jewish names, ordered scripts written, stars hired and fired, whole cities built. In the New Hollywood, guys like Lucas and Spielberg and Coppola shun the limos, the Beverly Hills mansions, the hot and cold running servants. The Old Hollywood was Big Name Stars and Exotic Locales and Expensive Sets and a Cast of Thousands. The New Hollywood is Good Actors and Literate Scripts and High Tech and Appeal to Imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
There is, believe it or not, something even dumber than watching professional wrestling and its fake brutality. It's a movie about professional wrestling and its fake brutality. The title is Grunt! The Wrestling Movie, and the question it poses to a concerned America is as follows: If the heavyweight champion loses his head - literally - during a title bout, does he forfeit his crown? In the beginning of an enterprise that would tax the patience of an idiot, there is an attempt to raise this issue humorously.
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