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Final Days

NEWS
July 14, 2005
Hospice worker's deeds offer hope for us all Thank you for your story about prison hospice worker Larry Christian ("At prison hospice, walls fall," July 7). It was very moving to read such an uplifting story in the same paper with stories about murders, rapes and shootings. Eighteen years ago, when I was a young mother, I had the honor of caring for my mother-in-law, Rhoda. This special woman was more my mother than my own mom ever was. Her loss was a devastation to me and to my children.
NEWS
September 27, 2001
When last seen in an NBA uniform, he was sinking a jump shot to win his team its fifth league championship. Then ESPN named him the greatest athlete of the 20th century. Suffice it to say that Michael Jordan has nothing left to prove, no need to burnish his image for posterity. So why is he dragging his 38-year-old frame out on the practice floor with a new team, the Washington Wizards? Why risk a comeback with a team that has been as much a byword for athletic incompetence as his Chicago Bulls were the emblem of excellence?
NEWS
November 11, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Baltimore Waltz is an AIDS play in which AIDS is never mentioned. Paula Vogel makes this possible in her 1992 work - which she wrote as a memorial to her brother Carl, who had died several years earlier - by setting her tragicomedy in the landscape of a dream. It is a place where the real and the surreal, the ridiculous and the serious, coexist in a context that is cracked yet weirdly logical. Anna, the sister in the play Vagabond Acting Troupe is presenting, is the one who is ill with a fatal disease.
NEWS
October 23, 2010 | By Cynthia Burton, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican congressional candidate Jon Runyan surged 10 points in an independent poll released Friday, and to top off the day, Gov. Christie told about 300 of the former Eagle's supporters at an afternoon rally that "this is the most important race in New Jersey to me. " According to a poll sponsored by Richard Stockton College's Hughes Public Policy Center, Runyan is in a statistical dead heat with freshman Democratic U.S. Rep. John Adler in...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2003 | Reviews by Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson, unless noted
BROTHER BEAR. OK Disney toon about a brash Indian brave (voice of Joaquin Phoenix) transformed into a bear. Great Disney artwork, wholesome story, very formulaic. (PG) B THE CAT IN THE HAT. Drat. It's flat. Cat (Mike Myers) goads two kids into trashing mom's house. Sub-literate, vulgar, witless, a betrayal of everything Dr. Seuss championed. (PG) D ELEPHANT. Gus Van Sant's attempt at poetic response to Columbine massacre, using amateur teens as high school victims, shooters.
SPORTS
April 1, 2002 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wouldn't it be ironic if this was the season Scott Rolen said goodbye to the Phillies and hello to superstardom? It could happen. In his Escape From Philadelphia season, Rolen could finally make the ascension from very good player to all-out superstar. He could finally make an all-star team. He could finally be a candidate for most valuable player, which everyone thought he would be when he was the National League's rookie of the year in 1997. He could do it because he's healthier than ever.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | BY JACK ANDERSON AND JOSEPH SPEAR
It was two years ago that Jock Hatfield died at the age of 26, and we still feel his absence acutely. Jock was a talented and caring reporter who followed the basic rule of investigative journalism: Comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Jock had arrived in our chaotic offices from California with one rumpled suit, enough money for about three meals - and a burning ambition the size of the Capitol dome. He was as green as new grass, but tempered by obvious physical handicaps that would have caused a lesser person to give up. Roaming Washington's sterile corridors of power, Jock was soon diligently and cheerfully exposing the graft and the gaffes, the mistakes and malfeasance that are red meat to a good reporter.
LIVING
October 23, 1997 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, New York Post, New York Daily News and USA Today
At a Tuesday memorial service for James Michener in Austin, Texas, copies of his last piece of writing were passed out to mourners. In a typewritten message dated Oct. 9 - a week before his death - the author wrote: "It is with real sadness that I send you what looks to be a final correspondence between us. . . . I approach this sad news [of terminal illness] with regret, but not with panic. I savor every memory as they parade past. What a full life they made. And what a joy they bring me now; what a joy your recollection of them gives me now. It is in this mood that my final days are passed.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Marc Schogol and Jeffrey Schogol, FOR THE INQUIRER
It wasn't the end of the Long, Gray Line. The U.S. Military Academy, founded in 1802, is approaching its 200th year and is still going strong. But for us, the trip to West Point in August was the end of the road - of the car trips our father-and-son traveling team has taken in the last decade. It was fitting that the finale was at an institution of higher learning, because, just a few weeks after making the three-hour drive to the northern terminus of the New Jersey Turnpike and then going up the Palisades Parkway to West Point, we made a 12-hour drive to Bloomington, Ind., to enroll son Jeff as a freshman at Indiana University.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Paterno, Pennsylvania's most recognizable citizen and a Hall of Fame football coach whose golden resumé was tarnished by a child sex-abuse scandal that beclouded his final days, has died at 85. His death, 2 1/2 months after he was diagnosed with lung cancer, came as an eerie fulfillment to a prophecy he had made often in the final decades of nearly a half-century as Pennsylvania State University's head coach. When Alabama's Bear Bryant succumbed to a heart attack in 1983, just 28 days after his 1982 retirement, a shaken Mr. Paterno absorbed the lesson.
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