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Final Draft

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NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
The Charlestown Township Board of Supervisors is close to approving a plan designating areas to be served with public sewers over the next five to 10 years. Thomas Committa, a planning and design consultant hired by the township, presented a final draft of the plan to the supervisors at their Tuesday meeting. Committa asked the board to review the plan and provide comments and suggestions on how to further restrict expansion of public sewers in the township. He asked for a decision at their August meeting.
NEWS
September 16, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state delegations to the Federal Convention late yesterday afternoon unanimously voted to approve a final draft of a constitution for the United States. The vote came despite the protests of several prominent delegates, including two from Virginia, that they could not sign the document. All day the delegates worked through the final draft, arguing a few small points, making a few minor changes. Then, the tinkering with language was over. The constitution stood in its final form, ready for the delegates to vote.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The final draft of a historic Northern Ireland peace agreement was presented to negotiators early today by their chairman, former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell, who cautioned that "major differences" must be resolved before a settlement could be reached by the Thursday deadline. The 65-page document, outlining changes in Northern Ireland's internal government as well as a stronger relationship between the British-controlled province and the Republic of Ireland to the south, will be intensely scrutinized in the next three days by the British and Irish governments and eight of Northern Ireland's political parties.
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | By Peter Smolowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
People expect fast action from local police departments throughout the West Chester region. But don't expect any fast decisions regarding whether to combine several of those departments, creating the state's largest regional police force and possibly saving taxpayers money. "This is going to take quite a while," said Ron Stern, a policy specialist for the state's Center for Local Government Services. "There's no need to rush on this. They [local officials] are doing this slow and methodical, and I would only hope they stay on that course.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | By Tony Pugh and James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Republican congressional leaders, reluctant to give Democrats an opening on a sensitive campaign issue, plan to ignore the final draft of a White House commission's report on Social Security. The report, to be presented today, offers three proposals to let workers invest part of their Social Security payroll taxes in stocks and bonds. "It will be coldly received," a senior Republican aide said. The 16-member panel, appointed by President Bush in May, was supposed to recommend only one investment proposal to help sustain the Social Security program long-term.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delegates to the Federal Convention yesterday waited for the committee writing the final draft of the constitution to finish. "The House met, but the committee of revision not having reported, and there being no business before the convention, the house adjourned," read the official journal of the convention. The committee began its work Sept. 8, with William Samuel Johnson of Connecticut serving as president. Other members of the committee are Alexander Hamilton of New York, Gouverneur Morris of Pennyslvania, James Madison of Virginia and Rufus King of Massachusetts.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | By Wes Conard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although the Coatesville school board approved the proposed strategic plan last Thursday, the plan will undergo another revision before it is submitted to the state, where it then must pass the muster of state reviewers. Over the next several months, Assistant Superintendent Judith Funk will be in charge of culling all of the information in the 500-page plan into a final draft, which will be submitted to the state. While the current plan outlines a broad range of initiatives, many of which are not required by the state, the final draft will describe only those parts mandated by the state Department of Education.
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By Steve Karnowski, ASSOCIATED PRESS
MINNEAPOLIS - The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released the final draft of a new crop insurance plan it says will save the federal government an estimated $6 billion over 10 years. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told reporters during a conference call from Washington on Thursday that $4 billion of the savings will go toward deficit reduction. He says $2 billion will be used to expand farm risk management programs and the Conservation Reserve Program, which pays landowners to take environmentally sensitive land out of production.
NEWS
July 24, 2000 | By Mark Stroh, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Plans for the Haverford State Hospital site moved one step closer to completion last week when two volunteers finished documents that will enable the township to hire a master planner for the site. Gary Bogossian and Peter Puglionesi, members of the Haverford Authority and Fund-Raising Task Force who donated their services to the township, presented the final draft copy of the request for proposals for a master planner to Thomas J. Bannar, the township manager, and Kenneth Richardson, the Board of Commissioners president, on Tuesday.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | By Mark Schmerling, Special to The Inquirer
While nearly everyone - commissioners, planners and representative of local institutions - agreed that an institutional zoning ordinance would be beneficial in Abington Township, action has been delayed for at least three to four months. At a public hearing Thursday, the township commissioners voted unanimously to have the township planning commission present a final draft of a proposed institutional zoning ordinance at a continuation of the hearing scheduled for Aug. 13. On May 14, the planning commission recommended amendments to the draft ordinance issued by the township commissioners in February.
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NEWS
March 21, 2014
I DON'T CARE about Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. At least, I don't care as much as people who have been glued to their flat-screen TVs (or hand-held electronics) for the latest, because the "latest" has too often been groundless speculation (a stowaway did it) and sometimes insanity (alien abduction). I do care about the lives of the hundreds of innocent passengers and crew. The spiderweb of tragedy radiates out to their families, friends and associates. But my caring doesn't change facts on the ground (or in the air)
NEWS
May 17, 2013
RECENTLY, in response to the hat trick of scandals that the White House has scored over the past few days, some liberal commentators have tried to distance President Obama from at least two of them. It's not surprising that the Fourth Estate is up in arms that a Holder-led Department of Justice snooped into the private lives of their Associated Press colleagues, so you can't expect them to carry Barry's water on that one. But the other two scandals that have either intensified (Benghazi)
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - The Egyptian judiciary intensified its resistance Wednesday to a move last week by President Mohammed Morsi to greatly enlarge his power, as the country's top courts joined a growing number of striking judges in expressions of dissent. Egypt's highest appeals court, the Court of Cassation, suspended work in protest of the edict authorizing Morsi to legislate without judicial oversight. The Supreme Constitutional Court accused the president, an Islamist backed by the Muslim Brotherhood, of participating in an attack on the justice system.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Anne Flaherty, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers said Sunday that they want to know who had a hand in creating the Obama administration's now-discredited "talking points" about the Sept. 11 attack on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, and why a final draft omitted the CIA's early conclusion that terrorists were involved. The answers could explain why President Obama and top aides, including U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, described the attack for days afterward as a protest against an anti-Islam video that spontaneously turned violent and why they played down any possible link to al-Qaeda, despite evidence to the contrary.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Kimberly Dozier and Nedra Pickler, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Former CIA Director David H. Petraeus told lawmakers Friday that classified intelligence showed the deadly raid on the U.S. Consulate in Libya was a terrorist attack, but that the administration withheld the suspected role of specific al-Qaeda affiliates to avoid tipping off the terrorist groups. The recently resigned spy chief explained that references to terrorist groups suspected of carrying out the violence were removed from the public explanation of what caused the attack so as not to tip off the groups that the U.S. intelligence community was on their trail, according to lawmakers who attended the private briefings.
SPORTS
September 3, 2012 | By Ladd Biro, For The Inquirer
RUNNING BACKS   1. Arian Foster, Texans All he has to do is stay healthy, and the multitalented tailback will vie for fantasy MVP status. When he's on, there's nobody like him.   2. LeSean McCoy, Eagles Just as deadly as a receiver as he is as a runner, Shady is the most important cog in the Eagles' offense. With Michael Vick vowing to take fewer chances this year to spare his body, McCoy should get even more red-zone looks.   3. Ray Rice, Ravens It's easy to overlook the role he plays in the Ravens' passing attack because Rice is such a strong rusher.
NEWS
December 17, 2011
Wouldn't it be fun to safely ride your bike or take a leisurely walk on a tree-studded path from the banks of the Delaware to the Schuylkill? The Pennsylvania Environmental Planning Council, a statewide organization with regional offices that work to revitalize communities, protect working farms, preserve critical wildlife habitat, and protect lakes, streams, and rivers, is working its way through an extensive process to come up with a plan,...
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Editor's Note: An element of this article has been corrected. Here is the correction that was published May 15, 2011: A May 12 story about a meeting of Philadelphia’s Zoning Code Commission failed to mention that some of Councilman Bill Green’s remarks had been made in an interview two days earlier. In that interview, he said he thought City Council would table the new code unless the commission accepted the changes he was advocating, but he did not say he would initiate the tabling of it. Green said he was concerned about the impact of the zoning code on the entire city and had proposed phasing in the new code neighborhood by neighborhood as their land-use maps are updated, rather than adopting the code simultaneously citywide.
NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Computer companies are full of great ideas, and I'm stealing one of them. I'm selling my rough drafts. Rather, uh, I won't think of them as rough drafts anymore. I'll think of them as earlier versions. I'll call them Scottoline 1.0. Yes, that's right. I'm going to start selling unfinished things to make money. Why not? Granted, it won't be as good as the final product, but it'll be as good as I can make it in the time I took, and there's no reason not to sell it that way, if people will buy it. Dumb people, like me. I bought two iPads at Christmas, one for Daughter Francesca and one for me, only to see Apple come out with the iPad 2.0 three months later.
NEWS
August 31, 2010
A story Sunday incorrectly reported the size of the dining space at Busch's seafood house in Sea Isle City, N.J. It has 450 seats. A story Monday about proposed changes to beach-access regulations in New Jersey misstated the time of the public comment period. The 60-day period, which may include hearings, will begin after the state Department of Environmental Protection publishes a final draft of the rules in late September or early October. A current draft may be reviewed on the DEP website via A story Monday about teachers' contracts in the Philadelphia area incorrectly listed the status of contracts in four districts.
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