CollectionsFinal Exams
IN THE NEWS

Final Exams

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to exempt A students from final exams in the Lower Merion School District again has been scratched - at least for this year. School Superintendent James Pugh said Monday night he could not recommend the policy, which would have allowed students who have maintained the grade of A throughout the year to finish their courses without a final exam. Pugh said he agreed that the exemption could provide an incentive for a student to study harder, but, he said, the change now would come too late in the year.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Lower Merion school board member has revived a proposal made by Harriton High School students in January to exempt A students from final exams. Board member Reaves C. Lukens Jr. suggested Monday night that the board consider the request made by a student contingent to waive exams for superior students. "I'd like to suggest we further consider that because of the confusion about what final exams are at present," he said. "The proposal has merit. I'd like to adopt a policy on an interim basis pending re-examination of the final exams.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The School District of Philadelphia has decided to give principals three options for calculating year-end grades for high school students whose final exams have been postponed because of the SEPTA strike. Final exams, which usually account for one-tenth of a student's year-end grade, were scheduled to begin in the city's public schools Monday, but were disrupted because of the transit authority walkout. District officials said yesterday that principals could: Schedule final exams for all students who are able to get to school, but only count the exam score if it would improve a student's grade.
SPORTS
June 1, 2005 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nothing closes the gap between class picnics and final exams like a national title. Germantown Academy swim coach Dick Shoulberg was notified yesterday by Swimming World Magazine that the Patriots' girls had won the 2005 national championship. After a dental appointment, he arrived back at GA, where class picnics were being held on the eve of final exams. He saw juniors Alicia Aemisegger and Danielle Visco first, and they spread the news faster than it takes GA's speediest swimmers to complete a 50-yard freestyle.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Gail Gibson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
North Penn High School principal Juan Baughn is finding out again this year just how hard students will work for an A if it allows them to miss a couple of final exams. "They're going to the library. For some of them, that's very creative," Baughn told the district school board last week during an update on the Renaissance Program. The program, started in January, sets up rewards for high school students who improve their academic standing. Part of the program allows students who receive all A's during a semester to skip some final exams.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | By Huntly Collins and Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Thousands of Temple University students will be required to attend class during the semester break to make up for class time lost during a 29-day faculty strike that ended Wednesday. But school officials said yesterday that they would make interest-free loans available to students who experienced financial hardship as a result of the walkout. Meanwhile, Temple reported some success in persuading students who had withdrawn because of the strike to re-enroll at the university.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The students had their arguments all lined up. They spoke quickly and eloquently, and laid out the pros and cons in true democratic fashion. But despite some fast talking by several high school students, the Lower Merion school board decided it would not permit students to use Walkman radios in school and it would not exempt A students from final exams. Members of the Student Advisory Council, including representatives of Lower Merion and Harriton High Schools, made the requests at Monday night's school board meeting, hoping for success.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | By Alan Sipress and Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
With the threat of a strike looming, institutions that depend on SEPTA aren't taking any chances. Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania are gearing up extensive shuttle bus services and ride-share networks to ensure that hospital employees can get to work. Management at the Philadelphia International Airport plans to dispatch shuttle buses to pick up workers at several points in the city, spokesman Mark Pesce said. And Aramark, with 1,000 employees in Center City and scores more in suburban food-service operations, said it did not expect any major disruptions.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sharpen those pencils, everyone. If you're a high school student in the Lower Merion district, plan on having a semester exam or its equivalent in all courses, in accordance with revised guidelines being implemented this year. The goal is to make midyear and final exams a consistent learning experience for students and an effective tool that teachers can use to measure progress, Alan Rosenau told school directors at their Monday work session. In the past, Harriton High School teachers giving the same courses have given identical semester exams, said Rosenau, director of secondary education.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Quiz: The law of gravity says A) Whatever goes up must come down; or B) The study of physics must remain solemn and sedate. If you answered B, you were proven wrong at Cedar Point amusement park's Physics Day. Thousands of high school physics students earned laboratory credits, and in some cases took final exams, by conducting experiments recently at the park. For instance, they buckled themselves into roller coaster seats with accelerometers strapped to their wrists to measure how fast they were going.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 24, 2013 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Staff Writer
THE EAGLES haven't even held their first training-camp practice yet, but thanks to the NFL, two of their rookies, Zach Ertz and Jordan Poyer, already are behind. Ertz, a second-round tight end, and Poyer, a seventh-round defensive back, are victims of one of the league's dumber rules. While the rest of the team's rookies spent most of the spring at the NovaCare Complex participating in OTAs and minicamps and familiarizing themselves with the offense and defense, Ertz and Poyer were on the West Coast finishing school and forced to learn their positional responsibilities via once-a-week Skype sessions with an assistant coach.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When religion professor Stuart Charmé decided to teach a course on the end of the world this semester, he knew he had a compelling hook: the Dec. 21 conclusion of the "Long Count" Mayan calendar that doomsday believers have latched on to as proof that time will end. But Charmé had no idea what the next few months would bring: the cataclysmic Hurricane Sandy, a fiscal cliff some have dubbed "debtmageddon," and an intensifying conflict involving Israel,...
SPORTS
March 10, 2010 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The basketball court is spotlit and harsh, riding like a golden space station amid the fathomless darkness of Madison Square Garden. There is nothing much beyond the orange of the rim that a shooter can use for perspective, just that lonely goal suspended up where the black of the arena meets the searing lights of the ceiling. Oh, it's quite a place any day, but fill it with rabid college basketball fans - some cheering for you, some cheering against you, some swinging back and forth with the pendulum of the game - and it gets even better.
NEWS
October 23, 2009 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After years of debate, Pennsylvania is going ahead with a plan to offer school districts state-approved final exams that students would have to take to get diplomas. The controversial plan that received a 4-1 vote of approval from a state review board yesterday is sure to change the lives of thousands of public-school students and teachers. Gone, for 11th graders at least, will be the PSSAs - the Pennsylvania System of State Assessment math, reading, and science tests that grew out of the No Child Left Behind law. The new Keystone exams, to be phased in starting next school year, signal a major shift in control of education policy: The tests would come out of Harrisburg, not local districts.
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former standout volleyball player at Unionville High School who was in her first year at the Naval Academy was found unconscious in her dormitory room Monday morning and pronounced dead a short time later. Kristen Dickmann, 19, was in the midst of taking final exams, said her father, who said the family was at a loss to explain what happened. Douglas Dickmann, of New Garden Township, said last night that his daughter had been in "outstanding physical shape. " When her alarm went off Monday morning, her roommates found her unconscious, he said.
NEWS
April 4, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a pretty sweet assignment: Watch at least five NCAA tournament games, then be prepared to think and write critically about them. College basketball fever has entered one local classroom. And it's for credit. For Rob Bryan, a student in Nancy Rosoff's "Heroes and Heartbreak: Sports in American Popular Culture" at Rutgers University-Camden, the NCAA focus is a beautiful thing. A huge sports fan, he would be watching the postseason games anyway. And Rosoff's class, he said, has helped him view sports through a new lens.
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | Daily News wire services
DENIES SLAY CLAIM ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A government minister quit yesterday after police named him as a suspect in the death of a Canadian woman at their shared home in the Pakistani capital. Shahid Jamil Qureshi, minister of state for communications, lived with Kafila Siddiqui, a Canadian citizen of Pakistani origin. Qureshi said that he believed the woman died of natural causes and that her family's allegations that he held her against her will were "baseless. " Troops raid lollipop factory; sucker's full of bomb gear BAGHDAD - U.S. and Iraqi forces on yesterday raided a lollipop factory being used to make bombs, finding boxes of explosives and two tons of fertilizer in the basement of the facility in northern Iraq, an Iraqi officer said.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Lisa and Joe Chascsa of Delran, the hard part in obtaining their college degrees from Thomas Edison State College should have been the final exams. Instead, it was finding a baby sitter so they could take the tests that posed the toughest problem. Despite working and parenthood, the Chascsas always managed to stay on course for their ambition - a goal that was achieved when they both received their baccalaureate degrees Oct. 7 at the college's commencement at the War Memorial in Trenton.
NEWS
June 15, 2005 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While most high school students are sweating over final exams, the 1,300 pupils at Delsea Regional High School in Gloucester County are not. This is the second year Delsea has dispensed with the two-hour finals and midterms. Instead, many students finish the year working on intricate projects that carry extra weight or on tasks that are a normal part of the class. "We were seeing GPAs decline, and we wondered what we could do about it," principal Joseph Sottosanti said. He and his staff at the Franklinville school debated what has long been a controversy in education: How fair is it to base a big part of a final grade on how well the student does on a single day?
SPORTS
June 1, 2005 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nothing closes the gap between class picnics and final exams like a national title. Germantown Academy swim coach Dick Shoulberg was notified yesterday by Swimming World Magazine that the Patriots' girls had won the 2005 national championship. After a dental appointment, he arrived back at GA, where class picnics were being held on the eve of final exams. He saw juniors Alicia Aemisegger and Danielle Visco first, and they spread the news faster than it takes GA's speediest swimmers to complete a 50-yard freestyle.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|