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Final Offer

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NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Marple Township employees voted Monday to accept what the township commissioners had said was their final offer on a three-year wage-and-benefit contract. The unionized highway workers, trash collectors, police dispatchers and nonadministration personnel, excluding police, voted 18-15 to accept an offer that will give each worker a minimum raise of 6 percent in each of the next three years, officials said. The employees had been working without a contract since Dec. 31. The contract is the second the union has negotiated.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE DEADLINE for the city's largest union to accept Mayor Nutter's "final offer" came and went on Wednesday, but it seems little had changed in the negotiations between the administration and District Council 33, which represents 11,000 blue-collar workers. The sides met twice this week to negotiate Nutter's plan, which includes pay raises in exchange for givebacks on benefits and work rules. But after spending Wednesday night together in a Center City hotel, they left without reaching an agreement.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration tried Wednesday to ratchet up pressure toward new municipal labor agreements, offering modest pay increases to AFSCME District Council 33 and describing the package as the city's "final offer" to end a four-year labor standoff. The city continues to demand sharply reduced pensions for new employees, the authority to furlough workers for up to three weeks a year, and new work rules to cut overtime. Mayor Nutter and other city officials hinted at the possibility of trying to impose contract terms if they are unable to reach an agreement by Jan. 30. "This proposal is a final offer to D.C. 33, and that is precisely what we told the union negotiating team earlier today," Nutter told reporters Wednesday night.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | By Mark Wagenveld, Inquirer Staff Writer
Contract talks between the Philadelphia Gas Works and the union representing about 2,000 of its employees ended early today with the union leadership saying it would submit PGW's final offer to a vote - but make no recommendation whether to accept it. The union's contract with PGW expired at 12:01 today, but employees are to continue working under the terms of the old contract until the vote next week, possibly on Wednesday or Thursday, the...
BUSINESS
January 15, 1993 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Reuters contributed to this article
Campbell Soup Co. raised the stakes yesterday in its takeover battle for Australian cookie-maker Arnotts Ltd., boosting its bid only hours after the bakery won a tactical battle in court. The Camden company raised its bid for the two-thirds of Arnotts that it doesn't already own to $9.50 Australian (U.S. $6.40) a share, from an earlier $8.80 (Australian) a share. The new price is Campbell's "last and final offer," chief executive David Johnson said. But some securities analysts said the new bid was not high enough to succeed and that they expected the price to be increased again.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2002 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With no formal contract talks scheduled, there is an increasing chance that 1,400 union employees at the Boeing Co.'s Ridley Township plant will go on strike at midnight tonight. The facility, which employs about 4,900 people, is one of Delaware County's largest employers and is one of the last places in the county where high-paying blue-collar jobs (about $26 an hour, on average) can be found in large numbers. If a strike took place, it would be the first at the Ridley plant since 1974.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | BY WALTER J. GERSHENFELD
The Pennsylvania House of Representatives recently passed a measure banning teacher strikes and calling for arbitration to end school district labor disputes. Over all, teacher and other unions favor the legislation, and school board officials are opposed. The matter is now before the Senate. Currently, under what is known as Act 88, school district employees and school boards can go to nonbinding arbitration (an oxymoron if ever there was one) on a final-offer basis, choosing between a final offer by total package or a final offer issue-by-issue.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
A negotiator for the Collingswood school board said last night that teachers rejected the board's final contract offer primarily because of disagreements over teacher preparation time. Spokesmen for the Collingswood teachers' association could not be reached for comment. It was unclear what the next step would be. On Sept. 16, teachers unanimously authorized a strike if a settlement could not be reached. The district's 186 teachers have been working under the terms of the old contract.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what it called a final offer, Temple University increased its wage proposal to 1,100 faculty, librarians and other academic professionals yesterday in an effort to avert a strike that threatens to shut down the 31,000-student school beginning at 12:01 a.m. Monday. Administration officials said the offer would boost faculty salaries and other compensation by 11 percent over the next two years, adding that it would exceed faculty pay raises at Pennsyvlania State University, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Pittsburgh and the Pennsylvania state system of higher education.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA'S 219 unionized transit cops went on strike at 2 p.m. Wednesday, just 20 minutes after their final offer was rejected at a bargaining session. SEPTA declined to discuss numbers, but Richard Neal Jr., president of the Fraternal Order of Transit Police, said his union was striking over a "measly" 50-cent hourly raise for mandatory recertification training required of all police officers. That raise would cost SEPTA $200,000 a year, Neal said. SEPTA's final offer of 15 cents an hour was "an insult," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA officials waited Monday for a union response to the transit agency's "final offer" in labor negotiations aimed at avoiding a strike by bus and subway workers. Union leaders told SEPTA on Monday they could not continue negotiations on key elements of a proposed contract without more information from SEPTA. No new talks were scheduled. But a strike did not appear imminent, as no strike-authorization vote had been called by leaders of Transport Workers Union Local 234. The last of four contracts for about 5,500 city and suburban bus, subway, and other nonrailroad workers expired Sunday night, raising the prospect of the first strike against SEPTA since 2009.
SPORTS
July 29, 2013
This is a post from Frank Seravalli's Frequent Flyers blog:   ON JUNE 24, one day before his client was bought out, Ilya Bryzgalov's agent bragged in an e-mail to the Daily News that he had "half a dozen" NHL general managers saying they would "have [Bryzgalov] on their team anytime. " More than a month later, Bryzgalov has not yet found a home for next season. Last week, Bryzgalov was left off Russia's Sochi Olympic evaluation roster, even though he played for his country at the World Championships in May. Sergei Bobrovsky and 38-year-old Evgeni Nabokov were invited.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE DEADLINE for the city's largest union to accept Mayor Nutter's "final offer" came and went on Wednesday, but it seems little had changed in the negotiations between the administration and District Council 33, which represents 11,000 blue-collar workers. The sides met twice this week to negotiate Nutter's plan, which includes pay raises in exchange for givebacks on benefits and work rules. But after spending Wednesday night together in a Center City hotel, they left without reaching an agreement.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
BEFORE THE Nutter administration gave its "final offer" to the city's blue-collar union last week, it appeared as though the second-term mayor might simply be running out the clock on his stalemate with the city's municipal unions, happy to pass the thorny issue of renewing contracts that expired in 2009 on to his successor. Now, at least in the case of District Council 33, it's increasingly clear that the party that's more content with the status quo is the union. Nutter's team on Wednesday proposed a contract with pay raises in exchange for possible furlough days, a less-generous pension system and changes to health-care benefits.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of union members rallied on Independence Mall Saturday morning, calling on Mayor Nutter to negotiate with some of the city's largest unions, who have gone without a contract for four years. National labor leaders, including the president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the head of the American Federation of Teachers, rallied a crowd of nearly 2,000 for two hours Saturday morning. "In the United States, we tell our kids, you have to go to college," said Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration tried Wednesday to ratchet up pressure toward new municipal labor agreements, offering modest pay increases to AFSCME District Council 33 and describing the package as the city's "final offer" to end a four-year labor standoff. The city continues to demand sharply reduced pensions for new employees, the authority to furlough workers for up to three weeks a year, and new work rules to cut overtime. Mayor Nutter and other city officials hinted at the possibility of trying to impose contract terms if they are unable to reach an agreement by Jan. 30. "This proposal is a final offer to D.C. 33, and that is precisely what we told the union negotiating team earlier today," Nutter told reporters Wednesday night.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA'S 219 unionized transit cops went on strike at 2 p.m. Wednesday, just 20 minutes after their final offer was rejected at a bargaining session. SEPTA declined to discuss numbers, but Richard Neal Jr., president of the Fraternal Order of Transit Police, said his union was striking over a "measly" 50-cent hourly raise for mandatory recertification training required of all police officers. That raise would cost SEPTA $200,000 a year, Neal said. SEPTA's final offer of 15 cents an hour was "an insult," he said.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Community College of Philadelphia on Thursday extended its final contract offer to faculty and staff who have been working under a contract that expired in August. The administration highlighted its offer of pay raises in four out of five forthcoming years and what it described as good health benefits and generous retirement benefits. The Faculty and Staff Federation of Community College of Philadelphia, which represents 1,167 full- and part-time faculty and 232 support staff, has been negotiating with the administration since January 2011.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Air Products & Chemicals Inc. raised its offer for Airgas Inc. by $4.50, to $70, a share Thursday, Airgas shares quickly fell more than $4 to less than $62. The reason? Investors reacted to the prospect that the takeover fight, which started in October 2009, could end with Air Products walking away if Airgas does not accept the latest offer. And that offer is still far below the minimum $78 a share that the Airgas board wants for the Radnor distributor of industrial and medical gases.
NEWS
November 22, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long-awaited rebuilding of PATCO's 40-year-old railcars has run into controversy even before the contract for the work has been awarded. The unsuccessful bidder for the $200 million project, Bombardier Inc. of Canada, says PATCO, in its push to get the contract out, didn't give the company a chance to make a "best and final offer" that would have offered brand-new car shells. The award of the contract to Alstom Transport Inc. of France to rebuild the cars at its Hornell, N.Y., plant was approved by a Delaware River Port Authority committee on Wednesday.
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