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Financial Aid

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NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Ellen Frishberg
I've just finished awarding $10 million in financial aid to students who otherwise couldn't afford to attend Johns Hopkins University. You'd think that would be a tremendously gratifying moment, an opportunity to reflect with satisfaction on the good we're doing for people who really deserve it. And it is. But it's also a tremendously frustrating moment. I'm frustrated because there is a large group of deserving people I haven't been able to help. It's tough for financial-aid officers to assist families who have never before sent a student to college.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | By Dodge Johnson, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Financial aid isn't the only way to ease the pain of paying for a college education. Here are a dozen more ideas for making it more affordable. If you are a parent paying the bills, here's what you can do: TALK WITH COLLEGE FINANCIAL-AID OFFICERS. Do this even if you do not qualify for financial aid. The officers want their college to be affordable, so they're on your team. Ask about loans for students who aren't on financial aid. For example, if you live in Pennsylvania, or your son or daughter is attending college in the state, you will learn that qualified families can borrow up to $10,000 a year from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phil and Mary Ann Thomas of Cleveland used to think the IRS was nosy. Then they discovered the University of Pennsylvania's financial-aid office. Their daughter, Kristen, has been accepted into the Class of 2000, and today is the day when she and other prospective Penn students must declare their intentions with a $200 deposit. Just a month ago, Kristen Thomas was dying to find out if Penn wanted her. Now it's the school's admissions officials who sit in suspense. The fall freshman class has 2,350 openings.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | By Jonathan D. Rockoff, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Collusion and free agency are part of the everyday language of professional sports. Now they're becoming part of the lexicon of academia. Alleging antitrust violations, the U.S. Justice Department filed suit in Philadelphia last year to block Ivy League schools and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from fixing uniform financial-aid offers to students accepted at more than one of the prestigious schools. Reluctantly, the schools gave in. Constans Salcedo, an 18-year-old Texan, is one of thousands who has benefited since.
NEWS
January 15, 2008
Yale University yesterday announced that it was boosting its financial-aid packages for middle-class families, joining a number of top colleges that are increasing grants, eliminating loans, and tinkering with financial-aid formulas to reduce the amount that even well-to-do families are expected to contribute. The Ivy League school is increasing its financial-aid spending by more than $24 million to $80 million annually, reducing the average cost by more than half for families with incomes up to $120,000 and by 33 percent or more for those making between $120,000 to $200,000.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Beefing up a commitment to make a Princeton education more accessible to low- and middle-income students, the university's Board of Trustees yesterday pledged that come September, no undergraduate receiving financial aid will have to take out loans to pay for school. Instead, scholarship money will now cover that portion of a financial-aid package that students previously had to borrow. The new "no-loan" policy, which Princeton officials believe is the first of its kind at a university, was approved unanimously by the board as part of a $5.6 million financial-relief package to be funded by the school's endowment fund.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | BY PAUL E. GRAY, From the New York Times
Traditionally, many of America's private colleges and universities have admitted students based on intellectual merit regardless of their financial situation. Financial aid, on the other hand, has been awarded solely on the basis of need. Now these fundamental principles are under attack. On May 22, Attorney General Dick Thornburgh charged the Ivy League schools and Massachusetts Institute of Technology with violating the Sherman Antitrust Act. According to the attorney general, the exchange of information among schools about financial-aid decisions constitutes a conspiracy to restrain price competition.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker and Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Nervous high school seniors start receiving letters from colleges this month telling them if they were accepted and - just as important for most - how much financial aid they qualified for. But some students who need to borrow more money than allowed under federal programs could find it difficult and costly thanks to the continuing repercussions of the subprime-mortgage debacle in the credit markets. Even the surefire, federally subsidized loan market is taking hits. Nineteen companies that specialize in federally guaranteed student loans have pulled out of that market, at least temporarily, according to FinAid Page L.L.C.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2011 | By Gail MarksJarvis, Chicago Tribune
Do you dare say "yes" to that college waiting to hear if you, or your child, will join the freshman class this fall? With the deadline approaching, you might be hesitant, terrified by the price tag. Dropping $20,000 to $50,000 a year for anything would be intimidating. But it doesn't have to be. The price might not be as bad as you think. Here's how to know: Is that deal final? Although colleges have sent letters outlining what parents and students are expected to pay, colleges will often sweeten the deal if you ask. So look over the college's offer.
SPORTS
February 6, 1991 | By Frank Lawlor, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Tim Panaccio contributed to this article
Coatesville High School defensive back Tony Miller, one of the top-rated defensive backs in the nation, faced a tough call. He could stay at home, go to Temple and play ball with his older brother, Dwayne, a cornerback for the resurgent Owls. Or he could strike out on his own and attend the University of Kentucky. To complicate matters, Miller fell short of 700 - the NCAA requirement for freshman eligibility - on his Scholastic Aptitude Test. If his latest results, which are due in two weeks, also fall short, he will have to rely on financial aid, rather than an athletic scholarship, to pay for his first year at school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey's colleges should reconsider the traditional "high aid, high tuition" funding model long in place, a task force on college affordability was told Wednesday. Steven M. Rose, president of Passaic County Community College, said he believed the funding model had grown unconsciously over time: When the state cut or limited funding, public colleges and universities would raise tuition, and the state money would go toward financial aid instead. Students from wealthy families can pay full price, Rose said, and students from low-income families can receive financial aid. But the students in the middle can get caught in the gap between being able to afford college and qualifying for need-based financial aid, said Rose, who also is chairman of the New Jersey Presidents' Council, an organization of the state's college and university presidents.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
TEMPLE University announced yesterday that tuition for undergraduate students will increase by 3.7 percent starting this fall. The university's board of trustees approved the increase, which will cost students an additional $600 this coming year. Tuition will be $14,006 for in-state residents and $24,032 for out-of-state students. Mandatory fees will remain at $690. Last year, Temple had more than 28,000 undergraduate students. The board attributed the increase in tuition to enhancements in student services and contractual salary increases.
NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Delina Adams found out she'd been named an Affinity Scholar, she started screaming. Her mother ran down the stairs of their Northeast Philadelphia home. "She thought I was dying," Delina said. A few days after the phone call from her college adviser, Delina held an official letter from Mastery Charter Schools, dated April 2, confirming she was one of its 35 Affinity Scholars. The letter suggested to the family a great cloud had been lifted. "You will receive over $150,000 in financial aid (inclusive of scholarships and grants)
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
FOR 18-YEAR-OLD Reginald Nelson of Nicetown, winning a Gates Millennium Scholarship allowed him to secure his place in Bucknell University's graduating class of 2018. "If I don't get it," Nelson told himself prior to winning, "I have to find another way to pay for college. " The senior, who will major in mechanical engineering, heard the good news when he stepped outside his psychology class at Mastery Charter School-Thomas Campus in South Philly to answer a call from his mother.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Paying for college tests the financial mettle of every family. So we highlight a program that may help you save and get a tuition discount regardless of whether you qualify for financial aid. The Tuition Reward Points program offers discounts off the "list price" of college when you make deposits to a qualifying account at a participating institution. Similar to frequent flier miles, you save and you earn points, which add up to dollars off of the college price tag. This isn't a 529 plan, and these Tuition Rewards Points aren't "hard" dollars, so the savings aren't considered to be a family asset and thus have no effect on the Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
NEWS
March 12, 2014
Harbingers Having heard the wailing of the frozen, huddled masses yearning for warm whispers of a season seemingly lost, it is time to remember (with apologies to New York Sun editor Frank Church) that, yes, Virginia - and your friends are wrong to doubt it - there is a season called spring. It exists this time of year in a place you cannot touch, see, taste, or smell, but it is there, hidden behind a veil of cold. The hard snowpack will give way, returning to its more pleasing form in ponds and birdbaths alike, welcoming the feathered folk that begin their return, towing the warm sun like a fiery chariot, transporting our longer, milder evenings back from their overwintering grounds.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania is launching a $240 million fund-raising campaign targeted specifically for financial aid - an effort to bolster its policy of providing all grants and no loans to students in need, school officials said Friday. The effort was announced at the board of trustees meeting. To start the "Penn Compact 2020 Presidential Initiative," the university is seeking $1 million in donations from at least five individuals, which Penn will match. If the effort is successful, Penn will have raised $600 million for financial aid over the last decade.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania is launching a $240 million fundraising campaign targeted specifically for financial aid - an effort to bolster its policy of providing all grants and no loans to students in need, school officials said Friday. The new effort was announced at the board of trustees meeting Friday. To kick off the "Penn Compact 2020 Presidential Initiative," the university is seeking $1 million donations from at least five individuals that the university will match.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON - Praising a New Jersey that "put aside political partisanship" while battling economic recession and weathering Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie delivered an inaugural address Tuesday that emphasized compromise and resilience, with no mention of the scandal that has been a cloud over his administration in recent weeks. "We started this journey together in a dark and foreboding time in our history, when hope was at a premium and trust had been squandered by a government who had been unwilling to tell you the truth," Christie said after he was formally sworn in for a second term at the War Memorial in Trenton.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
PENNSAUKEN The old saying that charity begins at home provides a fitting description for an unusual Pennsauken help group. Pennsauken Neighbors Helping Neighbors has made it its mission to help the needy in the town - not just during the holiday season but whenever financial aid is required. Since it was started in 2006, the group has helped more than 150 families by providing grants to ease hardships brought on by illness, job loss, or other emergencies. "We do it all year round," said founder Bill Orth.
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