CollectionsFinancial Aid
IN THE NEWS

Financial Aid

NEWS
November 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pilot program to expand federal financial aid to high school students taking college courses will make college more affordable and accessible for low-income students, local community college officials said. The U.S. Department of Education announced Friday that it would put up to $20 million in the Pell Grant program for up to 10,000 high school "dual enrollment" students in the 2016-17 school year. High school enrollment in specialized programs has fallen at some local colleges as costs have gone up. Pell grants would essentially subsidize those credits for low-income students, potentially boosting the number of high school students who take the college courses and then pursue college degrees.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | BY DARREN SPIELMAN & ERIN FEERICK
FOR THOUSANDS of young Philadelphians who graduated from high school in June and are now in college, the current season of midterm exams is the first big test of their college readiness. And for far too many, it will be the beginning of the end if those exams come back with lots of D's and F's. The revolving door for first-generation collegians has been a reality for decades - but it doesn't have to be. The Philadelphia Education Fund's Philadelphia Postsecondary Success Program, or PPSP, has been trying to change that by bringing together high school and college faculty to create consistent academic expectations and align curriculum and teaching strategies with the goal of a seamless transition to college.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in a decade, Cheyney University has failed to properly manage financial aid that it awards students, and as a result may owe the U.S. Department of Education more than $29 million. Errors were found in nearly 85 percent of about 4,400 financial aid records reviewed from 2011 to 2014, according to a report released Thursday by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. The university, one of 14 in the system, could not provide high school transcripts for 45 percent of the students who received aid during that period, the system said.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey's colleges should reconsider the traditional "high aid, high tuition" funding model long in place, a task force on college affordability was told Wednesday. Steven M. Rose, president of Passaic County Community College, said he believed the funding model had grown unconsciously over time: When the state cut or limited funding, public colleges and universities would raise tuition, and the state money would go toward financial aid instead. Students from wealthy families can pay full price, Rose said, and students from low-income families can receive financial aid. But the students in the middle can get caught in the gap between being able to afford college and qualifying for need-based financial aid, said Rose, who also is chairman of the New Jersey Presidents' Council, an organization of the state's college and university presidents.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
TEMPLE University announced yesterday that tuition for undergraduate students will increase by 3.7 percent starting this fall. The university's board of trustees approved the increase, which will cost students an additional $600 this coming year. Tuition will be $14,006 for in-state residents and $24,032 for out-of-state students. Mandatory fees will remain at $690. Last year, Temple had more than 28,000 undergraduate students. The board attributed the increase in tuition to enhancements in student services and contractual salary increases.
NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Delina Adams found out she'd been named an Affinity Scholar, she started screaming. Her mother ran down the stairs of their Northeast Philadelphia home. "She thought I was dying," Delina said. A few days after the phone call from her college adviser, Delina held an official letter from Mastery Charter Schools, dated April 2, confirming she was one of its 35 Affinity Scholars. The letter suggested to the family a great cloud had been lifted. "You will receive over $150,000 in financial aid (inclusive of scholarships and grants)
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
FOR 18-YEAR-OLD Reginald Nelson of Nicetown, winning a Gates Millennium Scholarship allowed him to secure his place in Bucknell University's graduating class of 2018. "If I don't get it," Nelson told himself prior to winning, "I have to find another way to pay for college. " The senior, who will major in mechanical engineering, heard the good news when he stepped outside his psychology class at Mastery Charter School-Thomas Campus in South Philly to answer a call from his mother.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Paying for college tests the financial mettle of every family. So we highlight a program that may help you save and get a tuition discount regardless of whether you qualify for financial aid. The Tuition Reward Points program offers discounts off the "list price" of college when you make deposits to a qualifying account at a participating institution. Similar to frequent flier miles, you save and you earn points, which add up to dollars off of the college price tag. This isn't a 529 plan, and these Tuition Rewards Points aren't "hard" dollars, so the savings aren't considered to be a family asset and thus have no effect on the Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
NEWS
March 12, 2014
Harbingers Having heard the wailing of the frozen, huddled masses yearning for warm whispers of a season seemingly lost, it is time to remember (with apologies to New York Sun editor Frank Church) that, yes, Virginia - and your friends are wrong to doubt it - there is a season called spring. It exists this time of year in a place you cannot touch, see, taste, or smell, but it is there, hidden behind a veil of cold. The hard snowpack will give way, returning to its more pleasing form in ponds and birdbaths alike, welcoming the feathered folk that begin their return, towing the warm sun like a fiery chariot, transporting our longer, milder evenings back from their overwintering grounds.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania is launching a $240 million fund-raising campaign targeted specifically for financial aid - an effort to bolster its policy of providing all grants and no loans to students in need, school officials said Friday. The effort was announced at the board of trustees meeting. To start the "Penn Compact 2020 Presidential Initiative," the university is seeking $1 million in donations from at least five individuals, which Penn will match. If the effort is successful, Penn will have raised $600 million for financial aid over the last decade.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|