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Financial Aid

NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University will kick off a $100 million fund-raising campaign in the fall specifically targeted at financial aid, as it continues a concerted effort to roll back the cost of education. Famous Temple alum Bill Cosby has filmed several videos the university will use to urge its 275,000 alumni and others to donate and help a new generation of students attend school at an affordable cost. It's the largest campaign specifically for financial aid ever undertaken by the 39,000-student university, whose main campus is in the heart of North Philadelphia and whose mission includes serving students from the region.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
As if they weren't already forking over enough to pay for their education, college students are also being pressed to use costly debit cards and pay hefty fees to middlemen to get their financial aid.   As many as 900 colleges have been pushing students into using payment cards that carry stiff costs, according to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group Higher Education Fund. The group said in a report that colleges and banks have been raking in millions of dollars from the fees, often through secretive deals.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg on Monday urged federal officials to review the proposed merger between Rutgers-Camden and Rowan Universities, questioning whether a deal had been "crafted to benefit powerful political interests without regard for the impact on students. " In his letter to U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan and the U.S. Attorney's Office, Lautenberg, a New Jersey Democrat, expressed concern about the merger's effect on thousands of students receiving federal financial aid. The letter did not name the "political interests" involved, beyond Republican Gov. Christie.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) on Monday urged federal officials to review the proposed merger between Rutgers-Camden and Rowan University, questioning whether a deal had been "crafted to benefit powerful political interests without regard for the impact on students. " In his letter to U.S. Secretary Arne Duncan and the U.S. Attorney's Office, Lautenberg expressed concern about the merger's impact on thousands of students receiving federal financial aid. The letter did not name the "political interests" involved, beyond Gov. Christie.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - President Obama embraced the idea of federal action to restrain the rapidly increasing cost of higher education, giving a boost to a policy idea that has been gaining steam. His proposal that colleges and universities cut costs or risk losing out on some federal aid was part of a larger package of "college affordability" ideas that the president unveiled Friday in a speech at the University of Michigan. Obama wants to increase funds for higher education, mostly through an expansion of federal loan programs.
NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - President Obama embraced the idea of federal action to restrain the rapidly increasing cost of higher education, giving a boost to a policy idea that has been gaining steam. His proposal that colleges and universities cut costs or risk losing out on some federal aid was part of a larger package of "college affordability" ideas that the president unveiled Friday in a speech at the University of Michigan. Obama wants to increase funds for higher education, mostly through an expansion of federal loan programs.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Williams said he soon hopes to narrow his growing list of prospective colleges to five or so. Higher on the star running back's current to-do list, after the recent announcement that West Catholic will shut its doors come June, is deciding where he wants to spend his final year of high school. For now, his top three schools, in no particular order, are La Salle, Imhotep Charter, and Cardinal O'Hara. The speedy junior added that Archbishop Wood and Roman Catholic are also possibilities.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2011 | By Gail MarksJarvis, Chicago Tribune
Question: Our son is a junior in high school, and we hope to send him to a top private college. Our income is now about $100,000, but the last couple of years have been difficult, and we have little saved. We will need financial aid. As you've suggested, we are going over our finances before the end of the year to make sure we'll qualify. We know financial aid gets cut when middle-income families have savings in their child's name. Our son has nothing, but his grandmother gave him her home a couple of years ago so it would stay in the family if she went into a nursing home.
NEWS
December 13, 2011
Gingrich myths piling up Newt Gingrich has enjoyed presenting himself as a historian rather than a politician during his meteoric rise to the top of the polls in the Republican Party's presidential field ("A weak GOP field comes down to two flawed front-runners," Dec. 5). It has been a convenient excuse, claiming to be a historian rather than a lobbyist, to explain away the $1.7 million he received from Freddie Mac, while he castigated "politicians" who he claimed should be jailed for their part in the home mortgage lending fiasco.
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