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NEWS
May 2, 2011
By Timothy R. Lannon Gov. Corbett's controversial cuts in assistance to colleges and universities point to a new model for funding higher education in Pennsylvania. As the governor has suggested, the commonwealth must attach more of its dollars to students and families, not individual institutions. Without such a shift, the proposed cuts to Pennsylvania's colleges and universities - especially public institutions - would be burdensome indeed. Higher tuition costs would limit access to a college education among low- and middle-income students at a time when the opposite has to occur.
NEWS
April 30, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph J. Maksin, who built a successful insurance company in South Jersey, always remembered where he came from. Maksin, who died in December at 82, grew up in Philadelphia's Fairmount section during World War II. He walked to Roman Catholic High School at Broad and Vine Streets to gain the education that would serve him as he achieved career success. On Friday, in front of dozens of students in the school's library, Maksin's son, Joseph Jr., and school officials announced that the late businessman, who graduated from Roman in 1946, bequeathed to the school $500,000, the second-largest gift in its 121-year history.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2011 | By Gail MarksJarvis, Chicago Tribune
Do you dare say "yes" to that college waiting to hear if you, or your child, will join the freshman class this fall? With the deadline approaching, you might be hesitant, terrified by the price tag. Dropping $20,000 to $50,000 a year for anything would be intimidating. But it doesn't have to be. The price might not be as bad as you think. Here's how to know: Is that deal final? Although colleges have sent letters outlining what parents and students are expected to pay, colleges will often sweeten the deal if you ask. So look over the college's offer.
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Aaya Kingsbury, CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL
Don't look now, but the economy has been improving, slowly but surely. Of course, that depends on whom you talk to. Economists may tell you we've turned the corner and that we face better days. An unemployed head of a household may still see very gloomy skies overhead. Somewhere in the middle is Sara Kline. An associate economist for Moody's Analytics in West Chester, Kline told participants of the Acel Moore Career Development Workshop that they should stay positive about their futures and that, in due time, the economy will turn around.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
So you've always dreamed of going to Harvard or Penn? Your chances got even harder this year as applications to both of the Ivies and many of their counterparts continued a second year of double-digit-percentage increases. The University of Pennsylvania took in more than 31,651 applications, a jump of 17.5 percent. Harvard reached nearly 35,000 applications, almost a 15 percent bump. Consider this: About 1.5 million students apply to four-year colleges annually. That means about one of every 50 students this year sought a spot at Harvard.
NEWS
January 27, 2011 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A wealthy George School alumna who had already given the Quaker boarding school one of the largest gifts ever made to a private school has left it an additional $30 million. Officials at the school in Newtown, Bucks County, announced the bequest of Barbara Dodd Anderson on Wednesday. Anderson, a 1950 graduate who called George School "a second home," announced in 2007 that she was giving it $128.5 million. She died in November at 78 at her home in Fresno, Calif. In all, school officials said, Anderson's donations total $165 million.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2011 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
We're back with more sites about paying for college. The focus this week is on financial aid for "nontraditional students" - meaning older people heading back to the classroom. At Finaid.com there's a page of links and tips for nontraditionals. Many state colleges, including those in New Jersey, allow older residents to audit courses for free when classroom space is available. Income is also key to winning financial aid, so even elder students need to fill out the U.S. Department of Education's FAFSA form.
NEWS
December 31, 2010 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aker Philadelphia Shipyard, which once employed more than 1,000 at the Navy Yard and which has been a significant Philadelphia economic force for a decade, is just months from shutting down. Aker's survival relies on several financial-rescue efforts coming together to finance the construction of two more oceangoing tankers. "If they don't build these next two ships, this yard is shutting down," said Manuel "Manny" Stamatakis, chairman of the Philadelphia Shipyard Development Corp.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
A senior vice president at Georgetown University on Tuesday was named the new chief of Lancaster's Franklin and Marshall College. Daniel R. Porterfield, who will step down as Georgetown's senior vice president for strategic development, will officially be installed as F&M's 15th president on March 1, though the transition will begin next month, an F&M spokeswoman said. Porterfield, 49, replaces John A. Fry, who resigned in March to become the president of Drexel University. Porterfield has taught English at Georgetown since 1997, and last year served as interim athletic director for the Hoyas.
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