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Financial Independence

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NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Kara Mcguire, McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
With your Fourth of July cookout and fireworks watching over, why not take some time to reclaim your financial freedom. Nagging money issues can put a chokehold on our lives. And in the weekly hustle, it can be hard to carve out time to tackle our financial to-do list. Granted, many money-related matters that can increase your financial independence - think increasing income or getting out of debt - take a lot longer than a day. But you have to start somewhere. Devote a couple of hours in the hammock with your laptop and you'd be surprised at how much you can accomplish.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Financial security: For some working stiffs, the phrase conjures up images of endless days on sun-soaked beaches, or maybe just waiting by the mailbox for dividend checks to arrive. In reality, however, while many of us dream of financial independence, most Americans lack the money-managing skills necessary to reach that elusive goal, according to two recent surveys. For example, the College for Financial Planning, a Denver institution that trains financial planners, found that: About 73 percent of Americans didn't set financial goals.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the day that Olivia Robb's mother, Ellen Gregory Robb, was beaten to death in the family's Upper Merion home, police led the 12-year-old girl to where her father, Rafael, sat in a nearby ambulance. "He told me not to worry, that everything would be fine," Olivia Robb testified Tuesday, speaking to jurors in the Montgomery County Court wrongful-death suit against her father. "No matter what I was told. " Instead, she lost both her parents. Within weeks, her father was behind bars for the killing.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Financial independence can mean being able to live on your own, feeling free to retire, or feeling free to work at something you enjoy without worrying about the size of your paycheck. J.D. Roth , founder of the Get Rich Slowly website, says in this post that he has boiled the subject down to a "one-page guide to financial independence" in the retirement sense. What does he suggest? A rather ambitious program to save money, and not just 10 percent or 20 percent of your income. "Your goal should be to save at least 50 percent of your income - and 70 percent is better," Roth says.
NEWS
February 17, 2005
THE SCHOOL District of Philadelphia could not agree more with the recommendations calling for the teaching of financial education in our schools made in your recent editorial "How to Help Working Families. " We has already implemented a financial literacy and financial independence curriculum for all grades. It introduces basic concepts about the value of money, saving, budgeting, credit, banking and investments and provides lessons to help children make good choices when spending money.
NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Tom Murt and Stephen Bloom
Imagine you're a single parent working and struggling to lift your family out of a tough financial situation. One day, your boss offers you a small raise. You accept gratefully, excited at your family's progress toward financial independence. But then you discover some very bad news. By accepting the small raise, you have just disqualified your family for desperately needed human-services benefits worth far more than the amount of the raise. Your kids suddenly risk losing child care, nutrition, and a safe place to live because you simply can't afford these things without the assistance you were getting.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Increasingly, working women are looking to gain financial independence through investments and changes in spending habits. A number of good books specifically geared toward women offer useful investment tips and budgeting. Here are a few books available at bookstores and libraries that might be worth a look: "Sisters Are Cashing In" by Marilyn French Hubbard. Perigee Books, 2000 ($14.95). Advice for African-American women on how to break spending patterns and fulfill financial success.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Bernice Kanner
Women the world over share a surprising unity of opinion about their most important life challenges and aspirations. In every corner of the globe and in every niche along the economic spectrum, what women want is greater security and control regarding family, financial and work circumstances, according to a survey of 30,000 women in 43 countries conducted by cosmetics giant Avon Products Inc. Three out of four of those queried said that...
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kwesi Koomson has spent his whole adult life teaching at Westtown School. He met his wife, Melissa, there. This month, the couple quit their jobs with the support of their Quaker school's community to head to a school in a small village in Ghana on the northwest coast of Africa. Koomson, 40, founded Heritage Academy in 2004 in Breman Essiam, the village where he grew up and where his family still lives. Its tin-roof homes are made of cinder blocks, and most of the families in the rural village of about 5,000 earn no more than $2 a day. The Koomsons usually visit twice a year.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | Jennifer C. Kerr, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The "golden years" may lose some luster for many baby boomers worried about the financial pressures that come with age. Many of the nation's 77 million boomers are worried about being able to pay their medical bills as they get older, a new poll finds. The concern is so deep that it outpaces worries about facing a major illness or disease, dying, or losing the ability to do favorite activities. Another major concern among the boomers: losing their financial independence.
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NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Tom Murt and Stephen Bloom
Imagine you're a single parent working and struggling to lift your family out of a tough financial situation. One day, your boss offers you a small raise. You accept gratefully, excited at your family's progress toward financial independence. But then you discover some very bad news. By accepting the small raise, you have just disqualified your family for desperately needed human-services benefits worth far more than the amount of the raise. Your kids suddenly risk losing child care, nutrition, and a safe place to live because you simply can't afford these things without the assistance you were getting.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kwesi Koomson has spent his whole adult life teaching at Westtown School. He met his wife, Melissa, there. This month, the couple quit their jobs with the support of their Quaker school's community to head to a school in a small village in Ghana on the northwest coast of Africa. Koomson, 40, founded Heritage Academy in 2004 in Breman Essiam, the village where he grew up and where his family still lives. Its tin-roof homes are made of cinder blocks, and most of the families in the rural village of about 5,000 earn no more than $2 a day. The Koomsons usually visit twice a year.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the day that Olivia Robb's mother, Ellen Gregory Robb, was beaten to death in the family's Upper Merion home, police led the 12-year-old girl to where her father, Rafael, sat in a nearby ambulance. "He told me not to worry, that everything would be fine," Olivia Robb testified Tuesday, speaking to jurors in the Montgomery County Court wrongful-death suit against her father. "No matter what I was told. " Instead, she lost both her parents. Within weeks, her father was behind bars for the killing.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Financial independence can mean being able to live on your own, feeling free to retire, or feeling free to work at something you enjoy without worrying about the size of your paycheck. J.D. Roth , founder of the Get Rich Slowly website, says in this post that he has boiled the subject down to a "one-page guide to financial independence" in the retirement sense. What does he suggest? A rather ambitious program to save money, and not just 10 percent or 20 percent of your income. "Your goal should be to save at least 50 percent of your income - and 70 percent is better," Roth says.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
In a volatile financial market, you may wonder if it is safe to keep investing. While taking extra care is in order as stocks and bonds gyrate, many experts say staying the course is usually the best thing to do. Fortunes are made during difficult financial times, investment writer Joshua Kennon says in an article at About.com titled, "Are bad economic times a good time to invest?" Uncertain times pose opportunities. "Warren Buffett has said that stocks are the only things people don't want when they are cheaper," Kennon writes.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | Jennifer C. Kerr, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The "golden years" may lose some luster for many baby boomers worried about the financial pressures that come with age. Many of the nation's 77 million boomers are worried about being able to pay their medical bills as they get older, a new poll finds. The concern is so deep that it outpaces worries about facing a major illness or disease, dying, or losing the ability to do favorite activities. Another major concern among the boomers: losing their financial independence.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Kara Mcguire, McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
With your Fourth of July cookout and fireworks watching over, why not take some time to reclaim your financial freedom. Nagging money issues can put a chokehold on our lives. And in the weekly hustle, it can be hard to carve out time to tackle our financial to-do list. Granted, many money-related matters that can increase your financial independence - think increasing income or getting out of debt - take a lot longer than a day. But you have to start somewhere. Devote a couple of hours in the hammock with your laptop and you'd be surprised at how much you can accomplish.
NEWS
July 10, 2007 | FATIMAH ALI
SOME ANIMALS got into our house recently, and we could hear them scurrying around. They sounded like squirrels and birds having a party up in our ceiling. As my son and his friend climbed to the roof to block the entrance they'd used, I explained to my 4-year-old granddaughter why they couldn't stay. She understood the animals' nesting instincts, but she couldn't quite grasp all the problems we'd inherit if they moved in for good. Our conversation about nesting turned to the cozy home that my daughter has created for her, and it got me thinking about all the creature comforts that human beings require.
NEWS
January 27, 2007
Stem-cell research Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) will soon be voting on the House-passed bill to extend federal financing of embryonic stem-cell research. His vote could decide the fate of many Americans. As a mother of a paralyzed son, I was elated to see the stem-cell bill pass the House. The American people have spoken loud and clear, with recent polls showing 68 percent in favor of embryonic stem cell research. Our families have the right to the best that medical science has to offer.
NEWS
February 17, 2005
THE SCHOOL District of Philadelphia could not agree more with the recommendations calling for the teaching of financial education in our schools made in your recent editorial "How to Help Working Families. " We has already implemented a financial literacy and financial independence curriculum for all grades. It introduces basic concepts about the value of money, saving, budgeting, credit, banking and investments and provides lessons to help children make good choices when spending money.
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