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BUSINESS
April 13, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Falling gasoline and heating-oil prices held overall wholesale prices to a modest rise in March, the government said yesterday, suggesting that inflation is in check despite fears in financial markets that it will pick up. The Labor Department said its Producer Price Index rose 0.2 percent last month after a 0.5 percent jump in February, when winter cold sparked a surge in the price of heating oil and other energy products. Prices rose 0.2 percent in January. An increase in food prices, including those for beef and vegetables, as well as advances in a variety of other products such as cars and tobacco, contributed to the March rise.
NEWS
August 29, 1998
It was inevitable, but still shocking. The Wall Street wealth machine - lavishing investors with profits month after month, year after year - dropped off a cliff this week. So did stocks around the world. This meant pain for investors and puzzlement for policy-makers. Yet it also gave these folks, from stock-market dabblers to high officials, a wake-up call that could be invaluable. The bulls have run on Wall Street, with few breaks, since the early 1980s. In this kind of market, you could pick winning investments any which way - from buying mutual funds to researching companies to throwing darts at the stock listings.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Mary Johnson has a long day ahead of her, but right now it's 6 a.m., and that means it's StairMaster time. She's in from Chicago for business and has a day pass at the Sporting Club, Philadelphia's toniest gym. But as she puffs and sweats up those simulated staircases, her eyes are transfixed on the soundless TV above her. A half-dozen other TVs in the vast room filled with early-morning-workout folk on sophisticated machines have on the same...
BUSINESS
August 2, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The nation's unemployment rate fell 0.2 of a percentage point to 4.8 percent in July, matching the lowest rate in nearly a quarter-century, as the economy created new jobs at a surprisingly fast clip, the government said yesterday. The strength in the labor market, coupled with separate reports showing solid growth in consumers' incomes and a booming manufacturing sector, made financial markets nervous amid concerns that economic growth might pick up enough to spark inflation - and that the Federal Reserve would raise interest rates to slow the economy.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1993 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The stock market used to love George Bush. It spent much of last summer and fall pining over his sagging prospects for re-election. It plunged with despair the morning after the electorate voted to toss him out of office. But, ever fickle, the market soon fell for Bill Clinton. If recent stock performance is any gauge, the markets have come to idolize the young Arkansan with the Elvis hair and the gift for gabbing as fluently as an economics professor emeritus on subjects such as debts and deficits.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Americans are grappling with dueling realities: Their portfolios have mostly recovered from the painful financial crisis, and might even show some tasty profits. But the U.S. economy seems fragile, and the labor participation rate is lousy. Most assume that when the stock market does well, the economy is booming. But that is not the case these days. "When companies are doing well, stock prices do well, so the economy must steam full ahead," says Esme Faerber, professor of business at Rosemont College.
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Columnist
No Business Section U.S. financial markets were closed Monday for the Labor Day holiday.
NEWS
May 29, 2012
U.S. financial markets were closed on Monday for the Memorial Day holiday. There is no Business section today.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Americans are grappling with dueling realities: Their portfolios have mostly recovered from the painful financial crisis, and might even show some tasty profits. But the U.S. economy seems fragile, and the labor participation rate is lousy. Most assume that when the stock market does well, the economy is booming. But that is not the case these days. "When companies are doing well, stock prices do well, so the economy must steam full ahead," says Esme Faerber, professor of business at Rosemont College.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who says congressional Republicans and Democrats can't work together in harmony with President Obama? Forget about the little stuff like running the federal government. Congress passed and Obama signed on Wednesday the Helium Stewardship Act of 2013. The world is safe for balloons, if not democracy. Air Products & Chemicals Inc. of Allentown applauded the cooperation, with Walter Nelson, director of helium sourcing, saying in a company statement, "We are just pleased that the legislation's passing prevented a difficult supply situation from getting any worse.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
I freely admit that I'm a worrywart. While most people are concerned when the stock market plunges, I expend an equal amount of hand-wringing energy when it defies gravity for too long. It might be the result of hearing one too many times the oft-repeated caution that "if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. " So I am probably one of the few people who was happy this week to see the Dow Jones industrial average experience its first three-day losing streak in 2013.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Good news about hiring and spending at retail businesses helped send the U.S. stock market sharply higher Thursday. For investors, the pair of government reports offered more encouragement that the U.S. economic recovery will continue even as Europe and Japan struggle. The Standard & Poor's 500 index soared 23.84 points, or 1.5 percent, to 1,636.36. The gains were broad. All 10 industry groups within the S&P 500 rose, led by retailers and other consumer-discretionary companies.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2013 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A Thursday afternoon rally on Wall Street gave the stock market a better day. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 10 points and falling at 12:30 p.m. as traders reacted to a slump in overseas markets. It seemed headed for another sell-off like Wednesday's 22-point drop. But the index reversed course and rose the rest of the day. It closed with a gain of 13.66 points, or 0.9 percent, at 1622.56. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 80.03 points, or 0.5 percent, to 15,040.62.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2013 | By Steve Rothwell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Stocks had their worst drop in more than three months as the prospect of political paralysis in Italy raised the specter of Europe's debt crisis flaring up again. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 216.40 points, or 1.6 percent, to 13,784.17, its biggest drop since Nov. 7. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 27.75 points, or 1.8 percent, to 1,487.85, dropping below 1,500 for the first time in three weeks. The Nasdaq composite dropped 45.57 points, or 1.4 percent, to 3,116.25.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2013 | By Martin Crutsinger and Christopher S. Rugaber, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve officials in 2007 underestimated the scope of the approaching financial crisis and how it would tip the U.S. economy into the worst recession since the Great Depression, transcripts of the Fed's policy meetings that year show. The meetings were held as the country was on the brink of the worst financial crisis since the 1930s. As the year went on, Fed officials shifted their focus away from the risk of inflation as they slowly began to recognize the severity of the crisis.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just because President Obama and Congress haven't cut a deal to avoid tax hikes and spending cuts that will threaten a new recession, is that any reason for investors to freak out and sell stocks, bonds, and retirement funds? Investment advisers - including some notable ones in the Philadelphia region - trying to preserve healthy 2012 gains in the markets after a decade of pathetic results, are pushing clients to stay calm about the mess in Washington. While the financial markets will be nervous until there is a deal, "the underlying economic data continues to offer encouraging signs," wrote a hopeful Mark Luschini, chief investment strategist at Philadelphia-based brokerage Janney Montgomery Scott, in a note to clients Wednesday.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By David McHugh and Don Melvin, Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany - The worst of Europe's financial crisis appears to be over. European leaders have taken steps to ease the panic that has plagued the region for three turbulent years. Financial markets are no longer in a state of emergency over Europe's high government debts and weak banks. And this gives politicians from the 17 countries that use the euro breathing room to fix their remaining problems. Threats remain in Greece and Spain, and Europe's economy is forecast to get worse before it gets better.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
Massive power outages. Mass transit disruption. Financial markets closed. Superstorm Sandy? Yes. But also the possible result of a cyberattack, to which we remain vulnerable. Before the storm, it was difficult to envision the havoc that could be wreaked by computer shenanigans. But now that risk should be readily apparent to us all. What remains to be seen is whether Sandy serves as a wake-up call in the face of this ongoing risk - one that lasts long after power has been restored, water has receded, and homes are rebuilt.
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