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Fine Arts

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NEWS
December 11, 2008 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack L. Wolgin, the man who commissioned the iconic Clothespin sculpture across from City Hall, once again is poised to make his mark on the city's arts landscape, this time by endowing an unprecedented fine-arts prize through Temple University's Tyler School of Art. Officials at Tyler said the $3.7 million gift from Wolgin, 92, will create the world's largest prize solely for fine artists, an annual $150,000 juried award to be known as the...
NEWS
January 8, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lofty goal moved within reach of aspiring South Jersey artists yesterday as the prestigious Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts agreed to accept Camden County College credits - the first transfer agreement in academy's 204-year history. Upon admission to PAFA, fine-arts graduates of the two-year county college can apply their liberal arts and studio credits toward a bachelor of fine arts degree. The change takes effect immediately. PAFA undergraduates previously were required to earn academic credits at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, which houses the nation's oldest art school and one of the premier collections of American art, is undergoing an ambitious expansion at a time when its operations have fallen deeply into debt. The academy has borrowed $6.5 million from its own endowment funds to cover operating losses accumulated in recent years. The accumulated loss was the largest of 90 U.S. and Canadian museums responding to a recent survey. Although the academy still has substantial reserves - $6.7 million - in its endowment funds, it has consistently lost money on operations in recent years.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
Students at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts can gaze around their historic studios with relief today, because academy president Frank Goodyear has decided to keep most of the coveted classrooms just the way they are. Goodyear in September had proposed converting the classrooms to gallery space to expand museum operations at the school, at Broad and Cherry streets. But he announced yesterday he had changed his mind. Students, led by sculptor and teacher Anthony Visco, had protested the plan vigorously in the fall.
NEWS
June 17, 1997
Summer is a season to look beyond the problems of the past school year and forward to the possibilities of the next. In that spirit, we celebrate the talent of some students in the Philadelphia public schools. Here is a selection from "Young Artists 1997," the annual districtwide art exhibit. Students from more than 200 schools contributed more than 1,000 works, in media from painting to sculpture and ceramics. The theme - "Creativity & Cognition" - posed a challenge to link imagination with other thought skills.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Last Thursday night was one of those evenings when juggling a family, a full-time job and night classes had Susan Miller ready to throw in her brushes. Miller, a 40-year-old graphic artist who lives in Moorestown, N.J., is married, has three children (ages 17, 10 and 5) and drives to Philadelphia one night a week for a portrait painting class at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. "I had to throw dinner at them," recalled Miller during her class later that night. "They were crying as I ran out the door.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Museum, Tina Howe's satirical play set in an art musuem, will be presented this week in a Philadelphia art museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. It will be staged tonight and tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 2 p.m. in the academy's auditorium by the Hedgerow Theater in connection with the museum's current exhibition, "The Vital Gesture: Franz Kline in Retrospect. " Kline, who died in 1962, was in every sense a modern artist, and it is modern art that Howe spoofs in Museum.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Nicolas Collins, a performance artist with a mean-looking, thickly wired horn, arrived at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts last night with five of his compositions and Relache. Collins plays a trombone, but not the usual way. His brass instrument is hooked up to a table littered with what he calls "homemade" circuitry. It includes a radio, tape and compact disc player, an audio mixer, guitar, circuit breaker, tapes and CDs. The sounds that erupt from this table proceed through an umbilical cord into the instrument, which is equipped with other gadgetry.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
A blurring of boundaries between fine art and craft continues to be the hallmark of American handicrafts produced in our day. We see this reflected in the 27th Annual Craft Exhibition now at the Main Line Center of the Arts. Selected from 115 tri-state area entries, the show gives 38 regional artists (including 12 Main Line residents) a welcome opportunity for a high profile. Many of those artists use organic forms derived from nature - shapes in clay, wood, enamel, weaving, handmade paper and metal.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
In the new Field-McCormick Galleries of American Art, the Art Institute of Chicago becomes the first major American museum to integrate the decorative arts with the fine arts. The galleries survey the 17th through the 19th centuries by showing furniture and silver alongside the paintings and sculpture of the period. The 32 galleries, intimate in scale and all of different sizes, are designed so that objects of domestic proportions can be contemplated, their designs analyzed and their surfaces scrutinized.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | Thomas Hine, FOR THE INQUIRER
For art museums, this season is all about the Big Picture, in more ways than one. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is providing a visual panorama of how Americans responded to one of the most catastrophic events of the 20th century. And at its heart is an epic, CinemaScope-scale painting of a grotesque event, Gassed by John Singer Sargent, on loan from the Imperial War Museum in London. The great 20th-century Mexican muralists also produced some big pictures, often on big subjects, such as The Epic of American Civilization , by José Clemente Orozco.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2016 | Mike Zebe, Staff
Moore College of Art & Design, Philadelphia, has named the following to its board of managers: Kathleen Shaver, an artist who has exhibited at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Woodmere Art Museum, and the James A. Michener Art Museum, is the ex-officio alumni council representative and board member; Flor Jazmin Gutierrez, archivist for the Cascarones Por La Vida fund-raiser in Philadelphia, is a young alumna on...
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Edward T. Gay Jr., 60, of Center City, lead broker in the firm of George Gay Real Estate Inc., died Thursday, Aug. 4, of respiratory failure at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Known to friends as "Ted," Mr. Gay was born in Philadelphia and grew up in Willow Grove. He graduated from Upper Moreland High School in 1974 and the University of Pittsburgh in 1979 with a bachelor's degree in economics and political science. From age 16, he was employed in the business founded by his grandfather in 1923 - first as a gofer and later as the broker in charge of others in the office at 2029 Walnut St. in Center City.
NEWS
July 24, 2016
Political party conventions, we are often told, have become exercises in image-making. Each produces two kinds of pictures: the memorable portrait and the cruel cartoon. The first depicts our party's candidate, the strong leader America needs to guide us through these troubled times. The other exposes the foolishness, nay the malevolence, of the opposition, pigheadedly determined to lead the country toward greater chaos and eventual ruin. This same contrast in imagery is visible throughout "Happiness, Liberty, Life?
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The city has ordered a stop to renovations at a Washington Square site because vibrations from the work were threatening a hundred-year-old Maxfield Parrish mural in the building, officials said Monday. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, which owns the Dream Garden mural in the Curtis Center, alerted the city about its concerns Thursday. The city issued an order halting construction the next day. The city said work would be suspended until stronger protections for the mural, which is made up of hundreds of thousands of pieces of glass, are put in place.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
On May 12, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) hosted a preview party for its 115th annual Student Exhibition. PAFA, founded in 1805, is America's first and oldest art school and museum. More than 10,000 people visited the exhibition, which ran from May 13 to June 5, and featured art from certificate and post-baccalaureate students. Art sales totaled $250,000. The preview was followed by cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, and music. causecelebration@philly.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2016 | Molly Eichel
Sandra Sedmak Engel says that the Rittenhouse Square Fine Art Show is her favorite festival of the year. The Baltimore artist loves the area, but she also digs what her fellow vendors are selling. "I love the fact that it's completely original art work. A lot of times, you'll go to these festivals, and you'll see prints and reproductions, or jewelry and clothes. But everything here is hand-done, and the quality is some of the best that I've seen. " Sedmak Engel is one of more than 140 artists who will display their work all weekend at the 89th annual spring show.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For the Daily News
DURING THEIR five-year courtship, Stephanie Covaleski's boyfriend, John Foster, suggested she get a tattoo. Her thoughts: "When he puts a ring on my finger, I will get a tattoo on my body. " He did, and after their August 2013 wedding, the Morrisville resident, now Stephanie Foster, followed through on her promise. The tattoo - her wedding bouquet - covers the right side of her torso, from her armpit to her thigh, strategically placed to be covered with clothing when she wants. She got it from tattoo artist Pete Zebley, who has created a niche business for brides at Central Tattoo Studio in South Kensington, which he owns with Melissa Montiel.
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