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Fine Arts

NEWS
March 10, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students with dreams of a professional acting career can hone their skills at Arcadia University, which will add a bachelor of fine arts degree in acting to its fall offerings. The only other school in the region to confer this degree is the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, said David Bassuk, director of Arcadia's theater program. Bassuk, who initiated plans for the program two years ago, said it would train students for classical theater, film and television. "It delivers both intensive training to enter the profession upon graduation while still taking care to bring them a well-rounded education," Bassuk said.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | By Lidija Zagadinow, Special to The Inquirer
For a couple of hours Saturday, several people in Frankford found respite from the wet, dreary weather by creating their own world of color and beauty - through art. At the Frankford Memorial United Methodist Church, Oxford and Dyer Streets, men and women worked on delicate watercolors or intricate designs of cut paper. A mile away, at Central United Methodist Church, Griscom and Orthodox Streets, women practiced dance. They were all taking part in the spring FrankfordStyle workshops.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
WHEN Sheinelle Jones left "Good Day Philadelphia" in March to spend more time with her three kids, she promised she wouldn't stay at home for long. After a seven-month hiatus, Jones is back with an even more high-profile gig. I've learned Jones will be the new weekend news reader on the "Today" show. Jones replaces Jenna Wolfe , a former WB17 sports reporter, who will move to the weekday "Today" as its first lifestyle and fitness correspondent. She begins the gig Oct. 4. Jones told me that the shift to the weekend "Today" show works around the reasons she left "Good Day" in the first place: to be with her family.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Dorothy Henries stood in the Pavilion Gallery in Mount Holly last week, searching for the eyes on a wooden sculpture of a woman's head. First she ran her fingertips over the thin ridges of the lips. Then she stroked the bridge of the nose with her thumb and index finger. "It's a Grecian nose, like mine," Henries said, holding the nose between her fingers. She ran her fingertips carefully and patiently up the face. "Here are the eyes," she said triumphantly as she pressed her hand against the rough, carved hairline.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Linda Lee Alter's collection of art by women, 25 years in the making, makes its public debut at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under the title "The Female Gaze. " At the entrance to the show, visitors are greeted by a monumental ceramic "grandmother" figure by Viola Frey that unequivocally announces not only that one has entered the domain of female art, but that this art easily holds its own with any other. As one quickly comes to realize, the "gaze" in question refers not only to women expressing how they experience daily life and the world, it embodies the intelligence that shaped the collection.
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
With lots including a mislabeled bust of Benjamin Franklin, a "lost" landscape by an early-19th-century American painter and a fanciful depiction of Allentown-by-the-Sea, a catalogue sale at the Fine Arts Co. of Philadelphia Friday and next Saturday will offer bidders a host of objects of above-average interest. The bust, illustrated on the cover of the catalogue ($10 at the door, $12 by mail), is estimated to sell for between $5,000 and $7,000 next Saturday. It was cast in plaster and painted to look like bronze.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Patricia Conway, a founding partner of one of the country's most successful architecture and design firms, will be the next dean of the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Fine Arts. She will succeed Lee G. Copeland, who will step down June 30. Previous deans of the school, whose offerings include architecture, landscape architecture, planning and fine arts, have taken leading roles in civic affairs through positions on the City Planning Commission and other bodies.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | by Anne R. Fabbri, For the Daily News
Would you like to own a painting by the next Mary Casatt or Thomas Eakins at today's discount prices? Join the knowledgeable collectors, art enthusiasts and dealers who will be flocking to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts tomorrow from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Sixty-six certificate candidates and twenty Master of Fine Arts graduates are exhibiting their work throughout the academy galleries immediately following the 3 p.m. graduation ceremonies -...
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beginning next week, successful bidders at Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia Inc. can expect to pay more for their acquisitions. The auction house, established in 1805 and arguably the oldest in the country (though not under the same ownership), is raising its buyer's commission from 10 to 12 percent on bids up to $50,000. The 10 percent commission will continue to be paid on any amount over $50,000, according to an announcement distributed at the beginning of the week. Throw in the 7 percent sales tax private buyers must pay and the final price of an object now will be close to 20 percent more than the winning bid. Freeman/Fine Arts chairman Samuel "Beau" Freeman said the commission increase was in line with those charged by major houses in New York.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rembrandt Peale is now suspect, but next weekend's gallery sale at Freeman/Fine Arts has so many other attractions that bidders still could easily - and happily - spend thousands. Almost 1,000 lots of ivories, silver goods, porcelains, artworks and furniture will be offered during the two-day sale, the first to be held on a weekend since Fine Arts merged with Samuel T. Freeman & Co. this summer. Many are from prominent local estates and owners, including Grace Loeb, Sarah Groome and Reeves Wetherill.
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