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Fine Arts

NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
On May 11, 1967 - four days before the opening of a group show in Philadelphia that would feature his paintings and prints - 36-year-old James Brewton died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The show, which also included the works of Thomas Chimes, Jim McWilliams, and Paul Anthony Greenwood, took place as scheduled, with Brewton's suicide bringing it more attention from local critics than such a show might typically have received. Nevertheless, the consensus was that Brewton - who had won several awards as a student at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, among them the coveted Scheidt Prize, and who painted in Denmark for two years before returning to Philadelphia - had been an exceptional young artist.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara L. Greenfield, 82, a grand dame of Philadelphia real estate and a tireless worker for civic causes, died Sunday, April 6, of cardiovascular complications at her Philadelphia home. During a career that spanned 50 years, Mrs. Greenfield was one of the leading real estate sales and listing agents for high-end residential properties in Center City. She started out as a broker for Greenfield Realty Co., the firm founded by her late husband, Albert M. Jr. Later, she moved to Albert M. Greenfield & Co., founded by her father-in-law and now operated by her oldest son, Albert M. III. Both firms are in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Violinist Francesca Rose dePasquale would seem to be well on her way: She was born into one of Philadelphia's foremost classical-music dynasties, is finishing her master's degree at the Juilliard School of Music, and is both a student of and teaching assistant to none other than Itzhak Perlman. Yet the career machinery that once waited for promising musicians such as herself only half-exists these days. That's why the 24-year-old is a grateful recipient of a grant from the Leonore Annenberg Fellowship Fund for the Performing and Visual Arts, to be announced Tuesday: Hers is an era of do-it-yourself careers.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS THE laugh that defined Jason Pennypacker. It embodied the essence and spirit of a man whose zest for life defied all constraints. It was a laugh that told the world that everything was right and fine, and that it was always sunny in Philadelphia. Frank Dougherty, former Daily News writer who was Jason's landlord for a time, employed his well-honed flair for description when he said Jason's laugh was like "naval guns booming across the water. " Actually, it was Frank's garden that took the brunt of that exuberance.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The Salvation Army has agreed to donate its property at 22d and Market Streets for use as a memorial park to honor the victims of the building collapse that killed six people there in June. The agreement was announced Thursday by Mayor Nutter, who praised the charity for its generosity. The transfer still needs approval from several authorities in New York state, where the Salvation Army is headquartered. Maj. Robert W. Dixon, the Salvation Army's regional director of operations, attended Nutter's news conference but, by prior arrangement, did not speak.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nothing really prepared sculptor Walker K. Hancock for what he saw in the towns of Europe as Allied forces closed in on Germany in 1945. Siegen, east of Bonn, was a rubble field. "The city had been solidly bombed for three months," Hancock wrote in his memoir, A Sculptor's Fortunes . "Corpses had been cleared away, but in one place I noticed a pool of blood with an American helmet beside it. " In this grisly and devastated place, Hancock also found some of the greatest of all European treasures.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Paris before it became the City of Light; the watercolors of an artist best known for portraits; creatures conjured from the medieval imagination - these are just a few of the fruits in this year's crop of books to be put out in the open, not hidden away on shelves. If you think books may be passé, check out the gorgeous buildings that house so many of them. Prices are list, but discounts abound. John Singer Sargent: Watercolors (MFA Publications/Brooklyn Museum, $60) . Sargent wasn't eager to show or sell his watercolors.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doris Staffel Malarkey, a highly praised artist and teacher and a devoted Buddhist and mother, will have her life celebrated at the Arch Street Meeting House on Friday, Nov. 1. Known professionally as Doris Staffel, she died of coronary artery disease Sept. 13 at her Society Hill home at age 91. Born Doris Blitman in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. Staffel started drawing at age 3, and painted up to three weeks before she died, said daughter Megan Staffel. "As long as she could paint, she felt energized and excited about life," Staffel said.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Ashley Kuhn, Inquirer Staff Writer
John L. Wade Sr., 76, of Germantown, an award-winning artist and professor emeritus of the Temple University Tyler School of Art, died Monday, Oct. 7, at Good Shepherd Penn Partners in Philadelphia of complications from sarcoidosis. In addition to having received numerous awards, Mr. Wade's primarily abstract works were exhibited in galleries throughout the country, including the African American Museum in Philadelphia. Mr. Wade was born in Wilmington and graduated from Howard High School in 1955.
NEWS
October 12, 2013
At a time when support for the arts is in flux, the city's cultural community has proven that it's still a font of creative ideas. Under a program launched last week, Philadelphia teenagers ages 14 through 19 can enjoy a year of free access to a dozen institutions, ranging from the National Constitution Center to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Of course, they can't skip school to look at a Kandinsky or a Gauguin. The free passes are valid only outside school hours. But if students spend enough of those hours at a museum or the zoo, their minds could be opened to worlds far more engaging than those offered by video games or Facebook.
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