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Fine Arts

ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2016
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Strength & Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musee Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen. Closes 1/4. $22; $20 seniors 65 & over; $10 students & children 18 & under; free for children under 6. Wed.-Mon. 10 am-5 pm. Closed Tue. Open 6-9 pm every first Friday and select Fri. evenings.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josh Garfield, 64, of Ardmore, a marketing executive and oil painter, died Wednesday, Nov. 4, of cancer at his home in Boca Raton, Fla. He and his family had just relocated to Florida after 26 years in Ardmore. Mr. Garfield was marketing director of Garfield Refining Co., a precious-metals business that has been in the Garfield family for three generations. He held the position for many years, working from an office in the 800 block of East Cayuga Street in Philadelphia. Born in the city and educated in Lower Merion and Boston, Mr. Garfield aspired to become an artist.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Larry Berger started college thinking he might combine his interest in art with industrial design. He ended up going to law school, instead, a fortunate turn that led him to a long first career as a business lawyer with Morgan Lewis LLP and a second professional act as general counsel at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Berger, 68, plans to retire from that position by the end of the year - and, when he does, he will have many stories to tell...
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state historical marker will be installed in front of the Curtis Center at 11 a.m. Wednesday honoring artist Maxfield Parrish, who attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in the 1890s. The Curtis Center, at Sixth and Walnut Streets, is home to Parrish's celebrated Dream Garden , an enormous glass mosaic created in collaboration with Louis Comfort Tiffany, and the subject of one of the city's most contentious preservation battles. The 15-by-49-foot mural was designed as the crown jewel of Cyrus Curtis' 1910 headquarters, where such magazines as the Saturday Evening Post and Ladies Home Journal were published.
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel W. Dietrich II, 73, a self-effacing philanthropist who valued quiet exploration as much as artistic adventure, died Tuesday, Sept. 1, at Paoli Hospital. Mr. Dietrich, who lived in Chester County, was heir to a family conglomerate that once counted Luden's cough drops among its assets. He was vice president of Luden's, based in Reading, for a time, but his tastes ultimately ran more toward cultural activities than business endeavors. A longtime board member and supporter of the University of Pennsylvania's Institute of Contemporary Art, Mr. Dietrich made a bold statement about his interests this year when he gave $10 million to ICA to form an endowment that would enhance the scope and flexibility of the institution's curatorial efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2015 | By A.M. Weaver, For The Inquirer
Five years ago, Miguel Horn returned to Philadelphia after living and working in Mexico as the assistant to acclaimed sculptor Javier Marin. An ambitious artist with Colombian and Venezuelan roots whose vision spans multiple communities and continents, Horn finds himself today, at 31, at a crossroads and immersed in determining the direction of his career. While public-art commissions punctuate his practice as a sculptor, he balances his portfolio with individual sculptures that express his inner psyche.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karl O. Karhumaa, 90, a sculptor who taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for more than 20 years, exerting a quiet but powerful influence on a generation of Philadelphia sculptors, died Monday at Wyndmoor Hills Health Care & Rehabilitation Center. He was recovering from a broken hip, friends said, when he died in his sleep. "He had a dry sense of humor, and his sculpture has humor - it's a lot like him," said friend and fellow sculptor Jerry Klein. Klein said Mr. Karhumaa was a figurative artist but saw figures "in a different way" than others at the academy.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of the Electric Factory concert venue is part of a plan to renovate a mostly vacant structure in center city next to a Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts building into a mid-rise residential tower. The Logan Square Neighborhood Association held a vote Tuesday on owner Convention Center Parking LP's proposal to add four stories to the dilapidated six-story building at 142 N. Broad St. and to convert it into apartments or condo units, association President Drew Murray said.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trudy Cohen, 83, a photographer and longtime Center City resident, died Wednesday, July 8, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of a cerebral hemorrhage. Born in New York City, Mrs. Cohen graduated from Hunter High School there. She attended classes for three years at the University of Richmond in Virginia in 1952. In 1976, after marrying and moving to Philadelphia, Mrs. Cohen completed a bachelor's degree in photography from Moore College of Art and Design. From 1977 to 1994, she was the official photographer for the Opera Company of Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frederic Howard Toone Bacon, 88, of Pottsville, Pa., former director of art education for the Philadelphia School District, died Tuesday, June 30, at his home. Though he had no children of his own, he was "the father I never had," said his sister Evie Barnwell, whose father died when she was 3. She recalls Pottsville winters when she was a child, when she and Mr. Bacon's three other siblings would trudge through fallen snow to school. "He would go first and break the trail," Barnwell said.
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