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Fine Arts

NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Joyce Robins' painted ceramic works are as much painting and sculpture as they are ceramics. One of a group that art critic John Perreault dubbed the New York School of Ceramics - artists who for any number of reasons happened to be working in clay but considered themselves accidental ceramists - Robins was a painter who initially used clay to make foliage for her paintings of abstracted landscapes. At a time when the hard-and-fast rules about what constituted painting and sculpture were being bent and broken by artists like Richard Tuttle, turning clay into sculptural support for paint seemed a natural to Robins.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
PROBABLY 90 percent of the time, Tattle brings you stories about popular-culture celebrities - or no-culture wannabes - but every once in a while, we delve into the fine arts - orchestras, operas, ballet and art. Piquing our curiosity today is a class-action suit against New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art that accuses the Met of scheming to defraud the public into believing that admission fees are required. See, what the Met does at the front of its ticket line is say that adult admission is $25. But, underneath the $25, in smaller type, is the word "recommended.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, curators at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts began planning an all-female art exhibition. Organizers hoped it would facilitate a debate about whether feminism is still needed in modern art, but they weren't sure audiences would find the topic worthy of debate. Then came Ken Johnson, a New York Times art critic who in only six sentences sparked an impassioned controversy that has played out for months on his Facebook page, arts blogs, an online petition and, on Sunday evening, a sold-out panel discussion at PAFA on the very topic the curators wanted to discuss all along.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville, NJ; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . $18; $15 seniors 65 and over; $10 students and children 17 and under. Sat.-Mon., Wed.-Thu. 9:30 am-6 pm; Fri. 9:30 am-10 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700. www.brandywinemuseum.org . The Magic Pencil of the Amazing F.O.C.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonardo Hidalgo's art career spanned several countries and dozens of years, but it was a dance school that brought him to Philadelphia. Mr. Hidalgo, who was born in the Philippines, was already a well-established artist and professor there when his only daughter won a scholarship to Philadelphia's Rock School of Pennsylvania Ballet in 1992. Mr. Hidalgo moved the family to Philadelphia - where he kept painting - and ended up staying for the rest of his life. He died at home Wednesday, Jan. 16, at 78 after suffering a heart attack.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Anthony "Tony" Gaye, 65, of Northern Liberties, a commercial and fine-art photographer who had studios in and around Philadelphia for about 30 years, died Thursday, Dec. 13, of a heart attack at his home. Mr. Gaye, who described himself as a "studio still-life photographer," was known for his work for advertisers and his fine-art work in galleries, said Frank Bolling, a longtime friend. "He did the photographs for the most recent Campbell's annual report," Bolling said.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Linda Lee Alter's collection of art by women, 25 years in the making, makes its public debut at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under the title "The Female Gaze. " At the entrance to the show, visitors are greeted by a monumental ceramic "grandmother" figure by Viola Frey that unequivocally announces not only that one has entered the domain of female art, but that this art easily holds its own with any other. As one quickly comes to realize, the "gaze" in question refers not only to women expressing how they experience daily life and the world, it embodies the intelligence that shaped the collection.
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