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Fine Arts

NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Low-income Pennsylvania residents will be able to gain low-cost admission to 17 of the region's biggest and most popular museums and cultural sites, thanks to a program to be announced Tuesday. The program, dubbed ACCESS Admission, will provide $2 admission for all holders of Pennsylvania ACCESS cards, electronic cards used for dispensing Medicaid benefits, food stamps, and other services. Each ACCESS card can be used by families of up to four, at $2 per family member; approximately 480,000 residents with ACCESS cards are eligible, according to officials.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia knows its families of artists, families in which the spark of creative vision is passed from one generation to the next and ignites in each. Just stand in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, beneath Alexander Calder's white mobile, Ghost , look down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to Swann Fountain's sculptural figures by Alexander Sterling Calder, and on to City Hall's tower, where Alexander Milne Calder's William Penn presides. Son, father, grandfather - three generations of artists defining one city boulevard.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
WHEN Sheinelle Jones left "Good Day Philadelphia" in March to spend more time with her three kids, she promised she wouldn't stay at home for long. After a seven-month hiatus, Jones is back with an even more high-profile gig. I've learned Jones will be the new weekend news reader on the "Today" show. Jones replaces Jenna Wolfe , a former WB17 sports reporter, who will move to the weekday "Today" as its first lifestyle and fitness correspondent. She begins the gig Oct. 4. Jones told me that the shift to the weekend "Today" show works around the reasons she left "Good Day" in the first place: to be with her family.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An artist has been selected to design a centerpiece at the planned memorial park at 22nd and Market Streets to honor victims of the Center City building collapse that killed six people last year. Barbara Fox, a 1988 graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), won a competitive selection process that was opened earlier this year to alumni, students, and faculty of the academy. She now joins a design team to work on the final plans for the memorial and park, said David R. Brigham, president and chief executive officer of PAFA.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
How can you bore me? Let me count the ways: 99. Fortunately, we don't have to sit/stand through all 99 Breakups , just 11, in Pig Iron's disappointing, self-indulgent, and thoroughly fatuous new work. My overwhelming feeling was, "What a waste!" A waste of a superb venue, a waste of fine performers I recognized from many other shows, and a waste of Pig Iron's honored spot in opening on the Fringe Festival's first official night. Not to mention a waste of my time. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is a magnificent building, filled with major paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
With a handsome new home down by the riverside, the 2014 Fringe Festival is ready to strut its stuff, officially starting Friday, though some things already are under way. Said stuff includes 130-plus "Neighborhood Fringe" productions, which pick themselves, plus the 11 invited shows of the "Presented Fringe. " FringeArts' headquarters at 140 N. Columbus Blvd. features a comfy 225-seat theater and a new brasserie and late-night bar called La Peg, run by chef Peter Woolsey. The bar offers free late-night festival programming starting with the startling combo of Martha Graham Cracker's famous drag act plus members of the Philadelphia Orchestra.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2014
West Philadelphia Alliance for Children , a nonprofit that focuses on improving literacy in children by opening previously shuttered libraries in public elementary schools, has named the following officers: Keith J. Richardson, managing director of the Philadelphia Housing Authority Development Corp., president; Ruth Brader , retired assistant general counsel in Wells Fargo & Co.'s legal division, vice president; Siobhan A. Reardon ...
NEWS
May 18, 2014
Seek security from civic strength In his remarks at the Sept. 11 museum dedication in New York last week, President "Yes We Can" Obama made a George W. "Bring It" Bush-worthy statement ("Obama: 'Nothing can ever break us'," May 16). Sounds good, but it's not true. Are we nothing? We can break ourselves by continuing down the wrong paths, including the creation of a surveillance nation, trade deals that off-shore better jobs for cheap, shiny objects and corporate profits, growing wealth inequality, and government dysfunction led by one party favoring a tax-free and science-denying America, and another that's well-meaning but enabling.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lily Yeh folds her hands on the small dining table in her tiny Philadelphia townhouse, drops her forehead to her ropy knuckles, and weeps. It is not unusual to see Yeh, 73, overcome with feeling. Since cofounding the Village of Arts and Humanities in North Philadelphia in 1989, she has made it her mission to bring creativity and art to broken communities. More often than not, she grieves for others' pain and finds joy in their successes. Her tears this time, however, are not for the neglected children of drug addicts in the city, or victims of genocide in Rwanda, or orphans in China, or the poor in Kenya, Palestinian areas, Ecuador, and India - all of whom have moved and inspired her. No, this time, the pain is personal.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
On May 11, 1967 - four days before the opening of a group show in Philadelphia that would feature his paintings and prints - 36-year-old James Brewton died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The show, which also included the works of Thomas Chimes, Jim McWilliams, and Paul Anthony Greenwood, took place as scheduled, with Brewton's suicide bringing it more attention from local critics than such a show might typically have received. Nevertheless, the consensus was that Brewton - who had won several awards as a student at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, among them the coveted Scheidt Prize, and who painted in Denmark for two years before returning to Philadelphia - had been an exceptional young artist.
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