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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Like Arms and the Man, which preceded it by three years, G.B. Shaw's 1897 Candida has to do with a woman asked to choose between a pair of suitors. Yet the two plays are substantially different. In Arms, the young woman is a pampered ninny, largely a device to accommodate the conflict between a preening romantic and a gimlet-eyed pragmatist. But in Candida, being revived at the Arden Theatre, the woman is not only the object of the conflict but must define its terms, and this time Shaw presents her no clear choice.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | By Gene Morris, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After blowing out its second straight opponent Friday night, raising its season scoring total to 69 points and its yardage to nearly 850, Downingtown coach John Barr was most excited about his linebackers. Linebackers? "We lost our three starting linebackers to graduation," Barr said after the 28-0 nonleague win over visiting Catholic League champion Archbishop Ryan. "We knew we had good ends, nose guards, tackles and backs, but we needed to get some play out of the linebackers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1992 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Red-haired, frail and freckled was how the character of Solomon in The Hand That Rocks the Cradle was first imagined. But as soon as Ernie Hudson read Amanda Silver's script, he wanted the part. So what if Hudson has dark hair, is athletic-looking and black? "I got hold of the script by accident," recalls Hudson, best known for his role as Winston Zeddemore in the two Ghostbusters pics. "I told my agent that I had to get in for a reading. It took me two or three weeks to finally get a meeting.
SPORTS
December 13, 1990 | By Dick Weiss, Daily News Sports Writer
When Villanova coach Rollie Massimino makes a list of great unsolved mysteries in the Big East, Seton Hall is bound to be near the top. The Pirates, who defeated the Wildcats last night at the duPont Pavilion, 81-77, have run off six consecutive victories over their Main Line foes. Most of those games could have gone either way. But this one ended with Seton Hall players dancing off the floor and Massimino shaking his head about an unexpected problem. The Wildcats (5-2, 0-1)
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Meredith Unger knows the value of hard work. Hard work led to the Haverford College junior's victory in the recent Centennial Conference cross-country championships. But Unger, who will lead the Haverford women's team into the Division III NCAA Mideast Regional tomorrow at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa., knows there is a fine line between hard work and an obsession that leads to an eating disorder. Many athletes cross that line, and Unger, a member of Haverford's Eating Disorders Council, tries to help them with their problems.
SPORTS
February 12, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The blessing of being a Big Five head coach is that usually you get so many of the benefits of coaching in Philadelphia and so few of the costs. There are the cranky alumni, sure, but there are precious few talk-show callers and hot-take columnists demanding that you be fired. Philadelphia is, first and foremost, a professional sports town, and the sheer number of Division I college basketball teams in the city breaks what would be a large single fan base into factions, none of which feels all that much loyalty, if any at all, to any of its local rivals.
NEWS
September 28, 2011
There is no NFL protocol for the rest of the body. Get a concussion and, due to the vagaries of the injury and the league's long failure to treat head shots seriously, a player has to pass a series of tests and be cleared by an independent neurologist. Injure your hand, break a rib, tear a ligament, sprain an ankle - do any of those and a player is not only free to play if he can, he is celebrated for his toughness. Playing hurt adds to the mystique, especially for quarterbacks.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | by Lew Sichelman, For the Daily News
Immediately after the new owners moved in, food mysteriously began to disappear. But the way Ed Ferguson remembers it, it wasn't until several days later that they found out why: The seller had left his pet monkey behind. Fortunately, sellers who leave things behind - or at least things of value - are a rarity. What happens far more frequently is that they take things that they shouldn't. All manner of things, too, like toilet seats, built-in microwaves, light fixtures, sometimes even the shrubs.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The man leans across the table and asks the question again, as if I had not heard him the first time. "Where is the line?" It is mid-morning and we are sitting over coffee - the West Coast's drug of choice - talking ostensibly about national politics. But the subject gravitates naturally toward sexual politics. He wants to know: "Where is the line?" Ever since Anita Hill's story exploded all over his office, spewing its uneasy debris, he has been searching for an E-Z marker to separate flirtation from harassment, a threshold between attention that is welcome and unwelcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
What's a director to do? The movie The Wizard of Oz is perhaps the most seen, most loved, most familiar-to-everyone movie ever made. So if you're Charles Abbott, and you're charged with taking theatergoers off to see the wizard in a musical theater piece, do you imitate the movie or try to be original at every turn? "I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't," Abbott conceded during a break in rehearsals for the show, which previews today and Tuesday and opens Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theatre.
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SPORTS
February 12, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The blessing of being a Big Five head coach is that usually you get so many of the benefits of coaching in Philadelphia and so few of the costs. There are the cranky alumni, sure, but there are precious few talk-show callers and hot-take columnists demanding that you be fired. Philadelphia is, first and foremost, a professional sports town, and the sheer number of Division I college basketball teams in the city breaks what would be a large single fan base into factions, none of which feels all that much loyalty, if any at all, to any of its local rivals.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
To be Irish is to have an existential dark spot in the soul, an ingrained gateway to fatal despair if it's not kept in check - which is what lies beyond the congenial face of Brian Friel's poetic, bittersweet play Dancing at Lughnasa . Though the play had an international vogue in the 1990s followed by a film starring Meryl Streep, West Philadelphia's Curio Theatre Company made a fine case for revisiting Dancing at Lughnasa at its Friday...
SPORTS
November 29, 2013 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Staff Writer
LeSEAN McCOY isn't a guy you wrap in plastic and save for a rainy day. He's one of the league's best running backs, and you put the ball in his hands as often as possible. You squeeze every ounce of production from him that you can. But there is a fine line between doing that and overworking him to the point that you risk shortening his career. As a former running back who jammed more than 1,700 touches into 114 NFL games, Duce Staley's been there and done that. But it's hard to think about tomorrow when you have to win today.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | SAM DONNELLON, DAILY NEWS SPORTS COLUMNIST
THE NEW coach says they need to "concentrate more. " The old defenseman, the one just demoted to the second power-play unit because of an inability to get the puck to the net, says "sometimes you think too much. " So which is it? Or is it - can it be? - both? Does 11 goals in eight games mean the Philadelphia Flyers are trying too hard or not trying hard enough? Are they thinking out there or, as it appears at times, not thinking at all? "When you're on a roll you don't think," Kimmo Timonen, the 15-year veteran defenseman, was saying after practice at Flyers SkateZone in Voorhees yesterday.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The political pendulum swung again for Pat Toomey last week. Cheered by the left and chided by the right for his stance on gun laws in the spring, Pennsylvania's Republican senator saw those reactions reversed last week when he sided with GOP hard-liners at the end of the government shutdown. On a high-profile vote to reopen the government and allow more borrowing to pay its bills, Toomey sided with Ted Cruz and the Senate's most conservative bloc to oppose the bipartisan deal.
SPORTS
October 4, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
IMAGINE, or recall, coaching a group of youngsters playing T-ball for the first time. While hitting the ball off the tee is something they could attempt almost all day long, trying to teach the other aspects of the game is quite a challenge. Training a 5-year-old to stand out in the sun and wait for a ball that never comes is a demanding task. Heads spin (literally and figuratively), attention wanes and frustration builds. Welcome to 76ers coach Brett Brown's world. The coach left for Europe yesterday for two preseason games armed with a 15-man active roster that features six players who haven't played a game in the NBA (Vander Blue, Michael Carter-Williams, Hollis Thompson, Royce White, Rodney Williams and Khalif Wyatt)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Where is Proust's madeleine when you really need it? Geoff Sobelle's trite exercise in nostalgia is triggered by stuff - old ice skates, wine glasses, fringed lamps, all kinds of uninteresting rubbish, all packed in boxes that reach halfway to the ceiling of the theater's enormous space. As he unpacks the stuff, he unpacks memories. We learn that the best week of his life was spent in France when he was 20; the centerpiece of this recollection was a traffic light, which he then unpacks, plugs in, and makes us wait through two rounds of red, green, and yellow.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Getting on the same page in relationships is the challenge of the day. Someone may be thinking of you as a sweetheart while you are still working out the logistics of friendship. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You'll derive pleasure from helping others, and you'll be rewarded with the highest esteem of your peers. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). If you're speaking more than you're listening, you're talking too much. But today, what you have to say is crucial to the group.
SPORTS
November 29, 2012
IT CERTAINLY looked like Andy Reid making his way down the sloped aisle from the back of the auditorium at the NovaCare. It was a walk he's made more than 200 times since he took over as the head coach of the Eagles in 1999. But something was different on Tuesday. Once he reached the podium for his day-after-game news conference, this was just a shell of the Andy Reid who had done this for nearly 14 seasons. The confidence, hubris, even arrogance Reid so often demonstrated wasn't there.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The best free agents were signed in April and July, and there is a veritable lack of star power in baseball's open market. Yet as 30 general managers convene in California this week, there will be talk of big numbers. The payouts from TV contracts are larger than ever. Fewer free agents will cost draft picks as compensation. There are new caps on amateur and international spending. It could yield a booming free-agent market and one that moves quickly. That is the dilemma Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. could face when he earnestly applies his winter strategy at this week's GM meetings, which run Wednesday to Friday in Indian Wells, Calif.
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