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Fire Apparatus

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NEWS
September 17, 1992 | For The Inquirer / RAYMOND HOLMAN JR
Elkins Park marked the 100th anniversary of its fire company by holding a Fire Apparatus and Muster Show along Tookany Creek Parkway Saturday. Visitors were able to get an up-close look at the company's trucks and equipment in a community fair atmosphere.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willingboro edged closer to launching plans to build a new emergency services building, estimated to cost less than $9 million, after auctioning off two unused fire halls that date back to the 1950s. The auction last month fetched nearly $600,000 after one fire hall was sold to a Burlington Township resident affiliated with the Life Fountain Bible Church and the other to a Jersey City, N.J., resident with ties to a construction company. The old fire halls were built at a time when volunteers handled most firefighting duties, Mayor Eddie Campbell said.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown Township residents are expected to vote this spring on whether the township should increase the fire tax by 4 mills to replace fire apparatus. The council agreed Monday night to ask the county elections board to put the fire tax referendum on the primary ballot in May. If the fire referendum is approved, homeowners with property assessed at the township average of $5,000 would pay $20 more in taxes beginning in 1991. The fire apparatus study committee recommended that the township impose the additional 4-mill tax to replace six major pieces of equipment.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
The Middletown Township Council has adopted a 1990 budget of $3,179,980 with no millage increase, but the council will ask for a referendum this spring on whether to raise the fire tax to replace fire apparatus. The preliminary budget presented last month called for a 4-mill tax increase to be used primarily to establish a fund to help pay for the replacement of fire equipment. The cost of the vehicles has risen beyond the ability of the township's three volunteer fire companies to raise money, officials said last month.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Darby Borough officials said Monday night they did not expect the creek there to flood because less rain fell than was expected. "I don't believe we're going to get the massive flooding that we thought we were going to get. We sort of dodged the bullet somewhat," Borough Police Chief Robert Smythe told reporters. But, with Darby Creek touching the bottom of the bridge at McDade Boulevard, officials were not taking any chances. Emergency personnel and fire apparatus will stay in place.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EDWARD SCARDIGLI had a passion for helping people, and he got plenty of chances as a Philadelphia firefighter. For most of his 26-year career, he was assigned to Engine 16 in West Philadelphia, one of the city's busiest companies. He managed to emerge unscathed from two of Philadelphia's most horrendous fires more than three decades ago, the Gulf Refinery in 1975, in which eight firefighters were killed, and the ARCO refinery fire in which then-Mayor Frank Rizzo was injured. At the Gulf fire, he saw his fire engine melt in the intense heat.
NEWS
November 27, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph B. Timoney, 85, of Wyndmoor, former fire chief of Wyndmoor Hose Company No. 1, whose work in various roles with the company spanned 62 years, died of cancer Nov. 22 at his home. Mr. Timoney joined the Montgomery County fire company as a volunteer in 1948, when the job was "a neighborhood thing," said the station's current chief, Francis DePaul. As firefighting became more advanced, he learned the latest techniques and passed them on to younger members. "Joe was teacher and a student," DePaul said.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tempers flared last night when a first viewing of the borough's 1995 budget showed that the George Clay Fire Company's request for $325,000 had been slashed to $181,000. "I'm supposed to ask these guys to come out in the middle of the night, and you want to cut expenses?" Dennis Frankenfield, company fire chief, asked the council. Company president Jim Smith said the firefighters had asked for a $150,000 increase to pay for repairs to the firehouse, located on Ford Street.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County volunteer fire company has been suspended after the township had concerns about how it was administered and whether it had sufficient funds to continue. Fire Company No. 4 in Darby Township, at Hook and Green Hill Roads, was shuttered Sunday. Fire services will be covered by other volunteer companies in the area, township officials said. The township has three fire companies, including No. 4. "We are trying to work with them," Township Solicitor Michael Pierce said.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doug Sanders is having a fire sale - seven days a week. He sells toy fire trucks, miniature fire hydrants, porcelain firehouses, firehats, lighters shaped like fire extinguishers, and photos and videos of famous fires in Camden and Philadelphia. If it has anything to do with fires, it's probably at Sanders' shop, The Fire Buff, right next door to the Collingswood Fire Department, Collings near Haddon Avenues. Where else? Sanders can even sell you a real fire truck for a mere $200,000.
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NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willingboro edged closer to launching plans to build a new emergency services building, estimated to cost less than $9 million, after auctioning off two unused fire halls that date back to the 1950s. The auction last month fetched nearly $600,000 after one fire hall was sold to a Burlington Township resident affiliated with the Life Fountain Bible Church and the other to a Jersey City, N.J., resident with ties to a construction company. The old fire halls were built at a time when volunteers handled most firefighting duties, Mayor Eddie Campbell said.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EDWARD SCARDIGLI had a passion for helping people, and he got plenty of chances as a Philadelphia firefighter. For most of his 26-year career, he was assigned to Engine 16 in West Philadelphia, one of the city's busiest companies. He managed to emerge unscathed from two of Philadelphia's most horrendous fires more than three decades ago, the Gulf Refinery in 1975, in which eight firefighters were killed, and the ARCO refinery fire in which then-Mayor Frank Rizzo was injured. At the Gulf fire, he saw his fire engine melt in the intense heat.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
THE CONTENTION that the Fire Department is following the model from the 1950s could not be further from the truth. ("A Red-Hot Issue: Phila. Fire Department must get its priorities straight," Daily Views, Jan. 11). In the 1950s there were at least 69 engine companies and 34 ladder companies. Currently, there are 56 engine companies and 28 ladder companies, not including the three daily brownout companies. Over the years, staffing has been reduced significantly. Engine companies were staffed with an officer and five firefighters, ladder companies with an officer and six firefighters.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County volunteer fire company has been suspended after the township had concerns about how it was administered and whether it had sufficient funds to continue. Fire Company No. 4 in Darby Township, at Hook and Green Hill Roads, was shuttered Sunday. Fire services will be covered by other volunteer companies in the area, township officials said. The township has three fire companies, including No. 4. "We are trying to work with them," Township Solicitor Michael Pierce said.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer
ROSE HAD 100 questions for the man in the rain slicker and police hat, and he listened to them all as the ocean swirled by her front steps. He only had one question for her. "I said, 'Will you please, please leave here with us?' " said George Greenland, a retired North Wildwood police officer, after hauling himself back into the 10-wheel military tow truck known as the "Wrecker. " Rose - Greenland didn't know her last name - is an elderly woman who lives on the 17th Street canal, on the bay, in the city's most flood-prone area.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Darby Borough officials said Monday night they did not expect the creek there to flood because less rain fell than was expected. "I don't believe we're going to get the massive flooding that we thought we were going to get. We sort of dodged the bullet somewhat," Borough Police Chief Robert Smythe told reporters. But, with Darby Creek touching the bottom of the bridge at McDade Boulevard, officials were not taking any chances. Emergency personnel and fire apparatus will stay in place.
NEWS
November 27, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph B. Timoney, 85, of Wyndmoor, former fire chief of Wyndmoor Hose Company No. 1, whose work in various roles with the company spanned 62 years, died of cancer Nov. 22 at his home. Mr. Timoney joined the Montgomery County fire company as a volunteer in 1948, when the job was "a neighborhood thing," said the station's current chief, Francis DePaul. As firefighting became more advanced, he learned the latest techniques and passed them on to younger members. "Joe was teacher and a student," DePaul said.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
It was Sept. 14, 1967, when Firefighter Robert P. McHugh and Battalion Chief James H. Malone screeched to a halt in front of a burning house on 19th Street near Montgomery Avenue. A crowd of neighbors gathered outside, and a woman told the firefighters that a baby was trapped on the second floor. Fire apparatus had not yet arrived. McHugh opened the front door and saw the smoke and fire. Disregarding his own safety, he dashed up the stairs through the choking smoke and was able to make out what looked like a pile of blankets on the floor.
NEWS
January 8, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albertus "Bert" Maurer, 92, of Moorestown, a retired plumber who was an active member of the Moorestown Fire Department for 63 years, died Dec. 31 at home. In 1987, when an Inquirer reporter asked Mr. Maurer what firefighters liked about their work, he answered: "The excitement. The adrenaline starts going when the alarm goes off. The blood pressure goes up, and off you go. " Mr. Maurer joined the all-volunteer department in 1946 and was a fire lieutenant for 20 years. Then, for seven years, he served as assistant chief.
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