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Fire Captain

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NEWS
January 27, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George J. Lieb, 86, a retired Philadelphia Fire Department captain, died of cancer on Sunday in Bryn Mawr Hospital. Before moving to Springfield, Delaware County, in 2001, Mr. Lieb had lived in Southwest Philadelphia since 1954. A spokesman for the Fire Department said yesterday that Mr. Lieb was appointed on June 1, 1947; promoted to lieutenant on Nov. 25, 1957; made captain on Jan. 13, 1964; and retired on Sept. 6, 1988. A son, George Jr., said that as an instructor at the Philadelphia Fire Academy in the early 1960s, Mr. Lieb "trained some of the people who later became fire commissioners . . . and lots of chiefs.
NEWS
January 30, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert E. Marriott, 84, a Philadelphia fire captain who was hailed as a hero for risking his life to save an infant from a burning house, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Immaculate Mary Home. He was a longtime resident of Northeast Philadelphia. On the night of Jan. 3, 1947, Capt. Marriott was relaxing in his home with his family when a rapidly spreading fire started at 3034 N. Orianna St., which was across the street from his house. Knowing that a woman and her three children lived there, Capt.
NEWS
May 12, 2010 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia fire captain was suspended for 30 days without pay for "musing" in an e-mail about ways to get minority recruits around an application deadline. But Capt. Troy K. Gore's actions and subsequent punishment apparently won't stand in the way of a promotion and $8,000 pay increase. Gore's suspension will cost him about $6,300 out of his $75,513 annual salary. It's the highest penalty Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said he could give, short of firing. Gore was placed on paid leave March 6 pending an investigation into a Feb. 28 message to fellow members of Club Valiants, the city organization representing African American firefighters.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph T. Gibbs, 76, a city fire captain who so enjoyed his years on the job that he remained a leader in fire safety even after he retired, died Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Gibbs was a resident of the city's Tacony section until he moved to Avalon, N.J., 14 years ago. During a career of nearly 22 years with the Philadelphia Fire Department, Mr. Gibbs worked at stations in several parts of the city, starting with Engine 17 at fire headquarters and moving on to Fishtown and Fox Chase before his assignment with Engine 36 and Ladder 20 in Holmesburg.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis D. Campanaro, 69, a retired captain in the Philadelphia Fire Department who also worked for the city school district, died Thursday, July 19, at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden. He died of multiple organ failure caused by septic shock, said his son Louis J. Campanaro. Mr. Campanaro joined the Fire Department in 1962 and retired in 1983, his family said. He helped battle the 11-alarm 1975 Gulf Oil refinery fire, which resulted in the deaths of eight firefighters.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fire chief did not hesitate. He walked into a room at the West Philadelphia nursing home and headed straight for the woman in the wheelchair. Hers was the voice he had heard cry "help" after 13 hours buried alive. The extraordinary encounter Friday between Mariya Plekan and John O'Neill was their first since he, then a Fire Department captain, rescued her from the rubble of a deadly demolition collapse two years earlier. "Hello, Mariya," O'Neill said. "Hello," she replied, looking up at the tall man. She could not rise to embrace the person who had saved her from the near-suffocating debris that had confined her in darkness for half a day. Her legs and her hip joints have been amputated.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JAMES McGARRIGLE never claimed to be God, but for the desperate firefighters trapped in a burning high-rise, their air packs running out, the man who led them to safety certainly was a figure of salvation. "When they saw his flashlight, they thought he was God," Jim's family said. Jim had landed by helicopter on the roof of One Meridian Plaza, the 30-story high-rise in Center City, that cold February day in 1991, scene of one of the deadliest fires in city history. A team of three firefighters reported they had become disoriented in the smoke and were running out of air. They died in the suffocating smoke.
NEWS
May 12, 2010 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia fire captain was suspended for 30 days without pay for "musing" in an e-mail about ways to get minority recruits around an application deadline. But Capt. Troy K. Gore's actions and subsequent punishment apparently won't stand in the way of a promotion and $8,000 pay increase. Gore's suspension will cost him about $6,300 out of his $75,513 annual salary. It's the highest penalty Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said he could give, short of firing. Gore was placed on paid leave March 6 pending an investigation into a Feb. 28 message to fellow members of Club Valiants, the city organization representing African American firefighters.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street told a contingent of black firefighters who gathered yesterday outside City Hall to protest the firing of an African American fire captain that he would not circumvent the Fire Department's grievance procedure and restore him to duty. "I'm going to let the process work," Street said after meeting with about 50 members and supporters of Valiants Inc., the organization challenging the dismissal of Capt. Asa Grimes on charges that he tried to coerce two subordinates into certifying a paramedic intern they believed was inept.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A veteran Philadelphia fire captain died Saturday night fighting a three-alarm fire in a Queen Village fabric store when the roof of the three-story building collapsed beneath his feet. The collapse - followed by the subsequent collapse of a second-floor roof and two walls - trapped Capt. Michael Goodwin, 53, inside the burning building, officials said. A second firefighter, Andrew Godlewski, suffered burns to his hands trying to rescue Goodwin before the second collapse. Dozens of firefighters at the scene on South 4th and Fitzwater Streets saluted as the body of Goodwin, a 29-year veteran of the department, was carried out on a stretcher.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
One morning in March 1968, Joseph A. Hall was riding on a bus from his Northeast Philadelphia home to his job as a city firefighter at 16th and Parrish Streets. When the bus stopped on Frankford Avenue near Oxford Street, Mr. Hall and Vincent Lehman, a fire battalion chief riding the same bus, saw flames shooting from a three-story rowhouse on Oxford. Before other firefighters arrived, newspaper stories reported at the time, the two men rescued two children who were about to jump from a third-floor window.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
In a move both bold and nostalgic, Curio Theatre brings Eugene Ionesco's absurdist living-room comedy, The Bald Soprano , back to Philadelphia. Why bold? Because before Brat Productions' former artistic director Madi Distefano left our city for warmer climes, she turned the show into something of an institution, staging several 24-hour-long productions over the last decade, during which the show was repeated in a continuous live-action loop. Curio's audience is potentially more familiar with this script than any other.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fire chief did not hesitate. He walked into a room at the West Philadelphia nursing home and headed straight for the woman in the wheelchair. Hers was the voice he had heard cry "help" after 13 hours buried alive. The extraordinary encounter Friday between Mariya Plekan and John O'Neill was their first since he, then a Fire Department captain, rescued her from the rubble of a deadly demolition collapse two years earlier. "Hello, Mariya," O'Neill said. "Hello," she replied, looking up at the tall man. She could not rise to embrace the person who had saved her from the near-suffocating debris that had confined her in darkness for half a day. Her legs and her hip joints have been amputated.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JAMES McGARRIGLE never claimed to be God, but for the desperate firefighters trapped in a burning high-rise, their air packs running out, the man who led them to safety certainly was a figure of salvation. "When they saw his flashlight, they thought he was God," Jim's family said. Jim had landed by helicopter on the roof of One Meridian Plaza, the 30-story high-rise in Center City, that cold February day in 1991, scene of one of the deadliest fires in city history. A team of three firefighters reported they had become disoriented in the smoke and were running out of air. They died in the suffocating smoke.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
      Robert R. Cowden Sr. was sworn in as a Philadelphia fireman at age 19 on Aug. 3, 1959. For 32 years, he devoted his life to fighting fires, first as a rookie, later as a lieutenant and captain, and finally as a city fire battalion chief. His climb up the Philadelphia Fire Department hierarchy mirrored a family pattern in place for four generations; Cowden men had served as city firemen since 1889. They thrived on the work and the challenge. "They lived and breathed it. It's not their job, it's who they were," said Mr. Cowden's son, Robert R. Jr. Mr. Cowden, 74, died Wednesday, Oct. 15, from complications of congestive heart failure at his daughter's home in Montgomery County.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democrats took down a controversial attack ad in a heated South Jersey congressional race Tuesday, even as the Philadelphia-born firefighter in the ad stood by its message. The cable TV spot attacked Republican candidate Tom MacArthur, accusing him of profiting from his former company, York Risk Services, as the insurance services firm denied claims from injured Phoenix firefighters. But MacArthur had sold the company and left it nearly a year before York got involved with the firefighters' claims.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 2:30 one recent afternoon, Neil Calore entered a small, white-frame house in Frankford, carrying a heavy bag in each hand. "Brought you some dinner, Anthony," he said, unloading pastries onto the kitchen table, then stuffing the fridge with the makings of seven meals: pork sausage, breaded chicken cutlets, fish with potatoes. Anthony Strazzeri, 96, sat upright and inspected the pastry. He had been waiting eagerly for Calore, who visits every week, delivering food and conversation - stories about family, politics, and how the world has changed.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William B. Young, 74, of Westville, who retired in 1992 as a captain with the Camden Fire Department after a 30-year career, died of hypertensive vascular disease on Thursday, Nov. 21, at his home. Born in Reading, Mr. Young graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden and served in the Navy from 1957 to 1961, where he was taught aircraft and shipboard firefighting. "They teach them a certain amount of firefighting in the Navy, and he fell in love with it," brother David said.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia firefighters union on Wednesday announced the establishment of the Capt. Michael Goodwin Memorial Fund to honor the firefighter who died April 6 in the line of duty. "We vowed to Mike's family, as we have to all families who have lost a loved one in the line of duty, that we will always stand by them and take care of them. This is the first formal step in that ongoing process," said Bill Gault, president of the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 22. Goodwin, 53, died battling an intense blaze at a fabrics warehouse in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia Fire Capt. Michael Robert Goodwin Sr. was mourned Thursday in the small neighborhood church where he attended Bible school, exchanged marriage vows, and brought his children to be baptized. Goodwin, 53, was killed Saturday fighting a fire on Fabric Row in South Philadelphia. His colleagues said he died living out his personal credo: that those who have earned positions of authority should lead by example and not dispatch others to do the hard work. Dozens of childhood friends already had filled the curved wooden pews of St. Michael's Lutheran Church in Kensington when Goodwin's mother, Elizabeth, arrived for the service.
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