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NEWS
February 22, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Fire Department will soon begin charging for emergency medical services that previously were offered free. Fire Commissioner William C. Richmond said the fee program, which was proposed to City Council last July, will save the city money and should curtail abuses of the system by people who make unnecessary emergency calls. "We have people calling in for animal problems," Richmond said. "It seems funny now, but it's not humorous at 4 o'clock in the morning after a squad's already been out 13 times.
NEWS
November 18, 2008 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers defended the proposed "deactivation" of seven fire companies yesterday, saying that overall staffing in the 2,400-member department would be maintained, and that firefighters would respond to "any and every emergency in an urgent and timely manner. " The data presented - a compendium of color-coded maps, tables of total runs of individual fire companies, and charts and graphs showing response times to fires and medical emergencies - reviewed the comparative performance of the city's 61 engine and 29 ladder companies.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Responding to criticism that the fire company received too little municipal funding, the Township Committee voted last night to increase its allocation over last year's by $10,000. The funding for the company, which covers Woolwich and Swedesboro, is included in a township budget that received preliminary approval. Final approval is expected April 2. "They've done one heck of a job," said Deputy Mayor Sam Casella. Last year's budget for the company was $35,000. This year's would be $45,000, said Jack Schock Jr., chief financial officer for Woolwich.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five weeks after Camden laid off a third of its firefighters, the shock waves are reverberating outside city lines. Camden's fire department was cut to such bare bones that a structure fire on any given day requires all seven companies to respond, leaving none to attend to any other fire or rescue emergencies in the city. Suburban fire companies - most staffed by volunteers - are filling the void in the densely populated, nine-square-mile city. "We've seen a direct impact," said Robert Mortka, president of the Camden County Fire Chiefs Association.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By J.F. Casale, Special to The Inquirer
Bristol Borough Council has appointed a new fire chief and other leaders of the fire department in the borough. At a meeting Monday night, the council voted unanimously to appoint Andrew Bidlingmaier, 35, as the chief. Bidlingmaier, who has been a member of the department for 19 years, will be paid $2,000 a year as chief. He had served as fire marshal for the department. Michael Plebani, the borough's fire chief since 1981, resigned, effective Monday, to "pursue other career objectives," according Council Chairman Donald McCloskey.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
It was Sept. 14, 1967, when Firefighter Robert P. McHugh and Battalion Chief James H. Malone screeched to a halt in front of a burning house on 19th Street near Montgomery Avenue. A crowd of neighbors gathered outside, and a woman told the firefighters that a baby was trapped on the second floor. Fire apparatus had not yet arrived. McHugh opened the front door and saw the smoke and fire. Disregarding his own safety, he dashed up the stairs through the choking smoke and was able to make out what looked like a pile of blankets on the floor.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Newtown Square Fire Department needs a green light from the township to guarantee a green light when responding to calls. At the Newtown Board of Supervisors meeting Monday night, the department proposed the installation of an Opticom traffic-light system, which would enable an emergency vehicle to activate a green light. "It would increase response time and decrease the chance of accidents," said Doug Everlof, assistant fire chief. Everlof said the department had problems with jams at traffic lights along West Chester Pike.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A faulty electrical outlet that sparked a three-alarm West Philadelphia fire Saturday night in which five people died was responsible for two previous blazes in the converted rowhouse. According to a report released yesterday by Fire Commissioner Harold B. Hairston, the Fire Department was not notified of the blazes, which apparently were several months apart and extinguished without injuries. Saturday's fire started about 10:34 p.m. in an electrical outlet providing power to a space heater in the bedroom of a first-floor unit of the building at 718 N. 42d St. Flames quickly spread to the underside of a box spring and mattress and then engulfed the room before racing out a door into the hallway and roaring up the stairs to the second floor.
NEWS
August 9, 2010 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 12-year-old autistic child who died in a West Philadelphia rowhouse fire Saturday night might still be alive if not for a recent city policy of temporarily shutting firehouses to save money, the head of the firefighters union and community members said Sunday. "This is just a Russian roulette game, and now a kid is dead," said Bill Gault, president of Local 22 of the International Association of Fire Fighters. The city's top fire official, however, defended his department's response time and faulted a lack of functioning smoke detectors in the house and a possible delay in reporting the blaze.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Max Fisher does it all the time. When he travels, the battalion fire chief drops by local firehouses, propelled by curiosity and camaraderie. He shares stories of fighting fires, 28 years worth. He takes a tour of the station, and then he exchanges fire company T-shirts. So a visit in January to a fire department in La Romana, a seaside city of 150,000 in the Dominican Republic, seemed routine at the outset. But after this encounter, Fisher walked away wanting to offer his fellow firefighters something grander than a cotton shirt.
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