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Fire Hazard

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NEWS
June 17, 1987 | By Joyce Gemperlein, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Frank Albert Young gets to wondering - and he gets to wondering from daybreak to nightfall - he walks what would be three blocks in a big city but in Lackawanna County is "down the hill and over the bridge and across the road" to his library. He has his own library set up in a rented storage shed because local fire inspectors told him a while ago that the numbers and bulk of the reference books he had jammed into his tiny, subsidized apartment were a fire hazard. Frank Albert Young is 81, very nearly 82. He is part Amish, part American Indian and part black.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Anthony S. Twyman contributed to this report
To the people on 9th Street, they're a warm tradition. To the fire marshal, they're a flaming threat to the stalls, the stores - and the entire Italian Market. City Council huddled yesterday over the fate of the market's fire barrels. And merchants went away warmed by a committee vote in favor of the cans. "This is the only market that does not have the ability to operate in the cold weather with the support of some type of warming device," Councilman James J. Tayoun said after the committee approved his bill to legalize the barrels.
NEWS
February 18, 2004 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As international oil company BP moves forward with plans to build a $500 million terminal in Logan Township to import liquefied natural gas, a national debate over the potential danger of the material is intensifying. In several communities across the country where such facilities have been proposed, elected officials and groups of residents have voiced concerns that liquefied natural gas, or LNG, facilities present a catastrophic fire hazard and might become terrorist targets.
NEWS
January 6, 1986 | By LINN WASHINGTON, Daily News Staff Writer
Charlie Day says he's just a small businessman trying to turn a buck in the car repair business in Strawberry Mansion. But neighborhood leaders call his operation an eyesore and a fire hazard. The problem is that Day does his work on the sidewalk, on the north side of Dauphin Street near 29th. Neighborhood leaders don't think the auto repair business is particularly appropriate for sidewalk vending. "This place is a grease pit. It distracts from the new mall," complains Maurice Floyd, Democratic leader in the 28th Ward.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
The Haverford school board plans to adopt a policy that will prohibit teachers and coaches as well as students from smoking on school grounds. The policy is the result of state legislation passed in December that requires schools to adopt policies prohibiting the use of tobacco in school buildings, facilities, buses and other properties. The state permits schools to provide smoking areas for faculty, maintenance workers and other employees. One student representative attending the work session Tuesday said that students wanted a comprehensive policy restricting employees and visitors from smoking.
NEWS
March 28, 1996 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 571-foot ship loaded with iron-ore pellets that caught fire Feb. 29 on Delaware Bay was being unloaded last night at Camden's Becket Street Marine Terminal, according to the South Jersey Port Corp. The B. Onal, a Turkish-registered ship, had been docked in Wilmington since then while the owners of its cargo, National Material Trading Co., looked for either a buyer or a terminal that would store the cargo. Camden fire officials last night said the ship posed no hazard and required no special efforts from firefighters.
NEWS
October 31, 1993 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hopkins Ford Inc.'s plan to add a painting and service center at the rear of its dealership on The Fairway received a cool greeting from residents who attended last week's Zoning Hearing Board meeting. George P. O'Connell, attorney for Hopkins, told the board that the 23- by 43-foot addition was necessary for the dealership to conduct business efficiently, he said in an interview Thursday. To construct the addition, Hopkins must obtain a variance from the township's 15-foot rear-yard requirement and a special exception for expansion in that zoning district, township zoning official M. Matthew Lahaza said.
REAL_ESTATE
October 19, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
  In the town where I live, every household gets a calendar each September (based on the school year). The latest edition celebrates the 250th anniversary of the volunteer fire department, the nation's second oldest after Philadelphia's. As it happens, October is Fire Prevention Month. So, as a public service designed to reduce the number of calls for electrical fires, "Your Place" offers the following tips from Leviton, manufacturer of electrical devices and lighting controls (dimmers, switches)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I have very nice neighbors who believe in leaving the wild and natural growth on their property. They have posted a sign that claims it to be a "certified natural habitat. " They never weed or cut anything back. At first, it was cared for, but now it has become an eyesore, and people who visit our house have made comments. I have tried to grow border plants to hide the mess, but nothing seems to help. I believe it affects the value of our home. My husband doesn't want me to say anything for fear of hurting their feelings.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Revel, the $2.4 billion former casino hotel sold this week for $82 million, went dark - literally - Thursday afternoon. Power was cut off around 2:20 after its supplier, ACR Energy, made good on multiple threats to new owner Glenn Straub and shut off the lights to the 6.2 million-square-foot, 47-story Boardwalk property. "Everything is out, it's a dead building," a security guard said after the plug was pulled. It was a hard-to-fathom turn of events even for the endlessly twisty saga of the Revel, once predicted to be an Atlantic City game-changer and now standing tall, dark, and empty in the unpredictable hands of Straub, a maverick Florida businessman and polo player.
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NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Revel, the $2.4 billion former casino hotel sold this week for $82 million, went dark - literally - Thursday afternoon. Power was cut off around 2:20 after its supplier, ACR Energy, made good on multiple threats to new owner Glenn Straub and shut off the lights to the 6.2 million-square-foot, 47-story Boardwalk property. "Everything is out, it's a dead building," a security guard said after the plug was pulled. It was a hard-to-fathom turn of events even for the endlessly twisty saga of the Revel, once predicted to be an Atlantic City game-changer and now standing tall, dark, and empty in the unpredictable hands of Straub, a maverick Florida businessman and polo player.
REAL_ESTATE
October 19, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
  In the town where I live, every household gets a calendar each September (based on the school year). The latest edition celebrates the 250th anniversary of the volunteer fire department, the nation's second oldest after Philadelphia's. As it happens, October is Fire Prevention Month. So, as a public service designed to reduce the number of calls for electrical fires, "Your Place" offers the following tips from Leviton, manufacturer of electrical devices and lighting controls (dimmers, switches)
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WE LOVE saying, "never again. " We said it on June 20, 2007, when that abandoned horse-blanket factory burned to the dirt at H Street and Westmoreland in Kensington - but not before spreading to 19 homes, destroying seven of them, along with nine cars. For years, neighbors had complained to the Department of Licenses and Inspections about the city-owned building, which had been so vandalized by squatters and addicts that L&I cited it as a fire hazard. But then came April 9, 2012, when Lt. Robert Neary and firefighter Daniel Sweeney died while battling the blaze that engulfed Kensington's abandoned Buck Hosiery Factory at York and Jasper streets.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Wednesday night meeting in Clayton's Borough Hall that became contentious even before its starting time drew a crowd so large that borough officials ultimately canceled the session, citing a fire hazard. Nearly 90 residents packed the courtroom for the zoning and planning board's 7:30 p.m. meeting, at which a proposed recycling facility was to be discussed. It was unclear when the meeting would be rescheduled. The plant, to be dubbed East Coast Material Recycling Facility, has been presented for an area off the 300 block of Cenco Boulevard.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | Associated Press
JEMEZ SPRINGS, N.M. - Fire crews in New Mexico on Saturday fought two growing wild blazes that have scorched thousands of acres, spurred evacuation calls for dozens of homes and poured smoke into the touristy state capital. State officials said the uncontained blaze near Santa Fe had spread to 8 square miles, leaving the city under a blanket of haze. The thick smoke also covered the Gallinas Canyon and the New Mexico city of Las Vegas. The fire in New Mexico's Santa Fe National Forest is burning just 25 miles from the city, prompting the Red Cross to set up an emergency shelter at a nearby high school.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
State and federal authorities on Thursday arrested the owner of a furniture store where two firefighters were killed earlier this year. The Philadelphia District Attorney's Office would provide no further details on the state perjury and fraud charges filed against Richard Knellinger, 40, owner of Giamari Furniture & Bedding on Kensington Avenue. The store was adjacent to the vacant Thomas W. Buck Hosiery complex, which burned to rubble April 9. One of the mill's five-story brick walls collapsed on the furniture store while four firefighters were inside.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat Nally got a hero's welcome as he stepped off a fire truck to the embraces of friends who had gathered Saturday for a fund-raiser and block party in Torresdale. It had been 21/2 months since Nally was pulled from the rubble of a building that collapsed in an adjacent warehouse fire and killed two fellow firefighters, Daniel Sweeney, 25, and Robert Neary, 60, in the city Fire Department's worst day in more than seven years. Still on crutches, with his badly crushed foot in a cast, Nally, 26, chatted with throngs of friends and well-wishers.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
THE H STREET FACTORY was a weaving mill and made slipcovers and handbags, among other items, from its opening in 1914 until 1973. 1973: Ayres-Philadelphia manufactures horse clothing there. Ayres acquires a loan, and the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development (PAID) becomes the conduit to get tax-exempt financing. Ayres goes out of business in the early 1980s. May 2006: Warehouse is scheduled for sheriff sale, but sale is postponed six times over the next two years.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By William Bender, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN Darby Borough cops found what they said were more than 200 marijuana plants inside Daniel Thomas' rowhouse Tuesday morning, he told them that he was an out-of-work horticulturalist. Technically, that's accurate, police say — if by "out of work" Thomas meant that his massive pot-growing operation featured an automated lighting and irrigation system that could function without his daily participation. "This guy is a major-league grower of marijuana," said Police Chief Bob Smythe, strolling in borough hall through a knee-high forest of pungent cannabis plants, which police had transported, using a rented Budget truck, from Thomas' house on Glen Avon Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I have very nice neighbors who believe in leaving the wild and natural growth on their property. They have posted a sign that claims it to be a "certified natural habitat. " They never weed or cut anything back. At first, it was cared for, but now it has become an eyesore, and people who visit our house have made comments. I have tried to grow border plants to hide the mess, but nothing seems to help. I believe it affects the value of our home. My husband doesn't want me to say anything for fear of hurting their feelings.
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