CollectionsFire Hydrants
IN THE NEWS

Fire Hydrants

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
About 45 Pennsbury residents last week questioned a proposal to install 19 fire hydrants in the township. The chief concern among residents at Monday night's Board of Supervisors meeting was the high cost of the hydrants and the prospect that the cost might rise. Under the plan, Pennsbury Township would pay the $200-per-hydrant installation fee, and the properties served by each hydrant would split the $228 yearly rental fee. Each hydrant would serve properties within a 780-foot radius.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | BY KUMAR KISHINCHAND
On the heels of another heat wave, I thought it appropraite to respond to your editorial, "Guess what - its hot" (June 23), and address why the redundancy of our message about the dangers of hydrant misuse does not lessen the importance of the message, nor justify use of hydrants for recreational purposes. Illegally opening fire hydrants drains water that is essential to supplying the needs of residents and businesses, and defeats a hydrant's ability to avert tragedy in firefighting situations.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
Water gushed full force from the fire hydrant at Palethorp and Cambria streets yesterday afternoon, but Roland Thompson of the Water Department drove right on by. "That's a bad corner," he said. "Drug dealers. " Teen-agers leaped happily in the rushing water, possibly unaware of their source of protection. "You don't just jump out at those corners and shut the hydrant off," Thompson explained. "They'll take you and throw you under that hydrant and drown your behind. They'll kill you. We'll get it, if we can get to it. " He called in the location to a two-man crew on his radio.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
Despite concerns about the borough's antiquated water system, the Parkesburg council decided Monday to pay the City of Coatesville Authority the $1,584 it had withheld in rent on faulty fire hydrants and to ask that an authority representative meet with the council. Borough Solicitor Norman J. Pine advised the council Monday that it could not justify withholding rents on any hydrant that was working. But, Pine said, the borough is not required to pay in advance, as the authority had requested.
NEWS
July 14, 2011
I am writing concerning a photograph in Wednesday's paper that showed children playing in front of a fire hydrant. Unfortunately, the photo is sending the wrong message to your readers. While frolicking in the spray produced by fire hydrants can be fun, it can also be extremely dangerous. The pressure produced by hydrants can produce bodily harm to children. It is also extremely important to point out that improper use of fire hydrants can cause water-main breaks, damage properties, and hamper the efforts of fighting a fire.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | By Nicole Barnes-Nelson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Portions of a judge's recommendation that would allow Pennsylvania-American Water Co. to buy Coatesville's water authority have been appealed to the state Public Utility Commission. The City of Coatesville Authority, Pennsylvania-American Water Co. and a Coatesville resident filed the appeals Monday. Last week, Louis G. Cocheres, a commission administrative law judge, recommended the approval of a $48 million deal that allows Pennsylvania-American to buy the city's authority.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Woodbury's superintendent of public works was suspended yesterday without pay for a month for allowing department employees to keep money derived from selling old city fire hydrants and water meters. The City Council voted unanimously to suspend Raymond Jack after a 5 1/2- hour hearing that ended early yesterday morning. The hearing, open to the public at Jack's request, came nearly a month after the council suspended Jack with intent to dismiss for allowing employees to sell outdated water meters and fire hydrants to scrap dealers for several dollars each.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Taxes in the township may go down by about $40 for some residents next year if the supervisors approve the administration's proposed budget, one supervisor said. The savings, however, would not come from the typical sources of real estate or earned-income taxes. The township instead plans to take over fees that residents pay for fire hydrants, reducing by 27 percent the average resident's non-income tax bill of about $147. The move, though unusual, would be fair to all residents, explained Supervisors Chairman Raymond "Skip" Goodnoe.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An investigation of scrap metal sales in the Woodbury City Public Works Department has led to the suspension of the department's top two managers. Woodbury City Police are investigating allegations that Superintendent Raymond Jack permitted an employee to falsify time sheets and allowed money from the sale of city property to go to employees. The City Council voted 8-1 on Tuesday to suspend Jack, without pay, with the intention to dismiss him. Jack said that he would request a hearing before the Council next Tuesday.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day was hot and miserable, and little Krystal Stankiewicz was begging to join her friends who were cooling off at an open fire hydrant. Her parents said no, but Krystal, 3, persisted until she finally got their OK to dip her toes in the puddle of water. Suddenly, as Krystal's father stood nearby, the spray of water turned into a forceful gush, apparently when someone removed the sprinkler cap from the hydrant. It pushed 30-pound Krystal into the middle of the street and into the path of a car. The car struck Krystal, crushing her head and chest.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer
ROSE HAD 100 questions for the man in the rain slicker and police hat, and he listened to them all as the ocean swirled by her front steps. He only had one question for her. "I said, 'Will you please, please leave here with us?' " said George Greenland, a retired North Wildwood police officer, after hauling himself back into the 10-wheel military tow truck known as the "Wrecker. " Rose - Greenland didn't know her last name - is an elderly woman who lives on the 17th Street canal, on the bay, in the city's most flood-prone area.
NEWS
August 19, 2012 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
WILDWOOD CREST - It's full-on summertime hot as Matt Long sets up his yellow buckets, pastry knives, and brushes at the far end of the beach and gets to work. What is it? Right now, it's a blob of sand. A four-foot-high wedding cake of brown. Slowly, carefully, the shape of a hydrant emerges. Six hours later, countless grains of hard, broken rock have become a carved hand reaching from the Earth, turning a spigot on one side of the hydrant while "water" returns to the ground on the other.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
A water shortage west of the Cooper River in Camden that began Thursday and persisted through Saturday has been linked to a broken main. The cause of the break is unknown. The water shortage was made worse by unauthorized opening of fire hydrants when temperatures soared into the high 90s Thursday and Friday, officials said. The break was found Saturday morning. By that evening, the city was able to end the "boil water" advisory, which was issued Thursday evening as areas served by United Water were subject to minimal water flow.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
As temperatures rose into the mid-90s Thursday, some Camden neighborhoods west of the Cooper River had little or no running water, due to the number of opened fire hydrants. Because of the low flow, the city advised residents in affected neighborhoods to boil water or use bottled water until further notice. Low pressure "creates a danger for the entire community," said Rich Henning, a spokesman for United Water, which serves Camden. "The gravest danger is that there is not enough water for firefighters to fulfill their obligation to protect the public from fires.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
THE JULY 13 photo you ran of children playing in front of a fire hydrant may look like fun, but it sends the wrong message to the people who read your paper. Frolicking in the spray produced by hydrants can be fun, but also dangerous. Improper use of hydrants can cause water main breaks, damage property and hamper the efforts of fighting a fire. Please report an illegally opened fire hydrant by calling 215-685-6300. Howard Neukrug Philadelphia Water Commissioner
NEWS
July 16, 2011
What makes B.G. Kelley think that halfball is a Philadelphia game ("Halfball was wholly Philadelphia," July 7)? I was raised in New York during the Great Depression some 80 years ago. We depended on our ingenuity for games and playthings. Popular ball games used the pimple ball or the pink rubber ball. Since there were no rowhouses, our "ballparks" were the city canyons lined by six-story apartment buildings. We played halfball, stickball, stoopball, stepball, curbball, wallball, boxball, and punchball.
NEWS
July 14, 2011
I am writing concerning a photograph in Wednesday's paper that showed children playing in front of a fire hydrant. Unfortunately, the photo is sending the wrong message to your readers. While frolicking in the spray produced by fire hydrants can be fun, it can also be extremely dangerous. The pressure produced by hydrants can produce bodily harm to children. It is also extremely important to point out that improper use of fire hydrants can cause water-main breaks, damage properties, and hamper the efforts of fighting a fire.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|