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Fire Protection

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NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Three Delaware County municipalities have fire protection questions on the ballot in Tuesday's election, but nowhere is the referendum more burning than in Millbourne, where an entire volunteer system is at stake. There, voters will be asked to decide whether they want to continue using the services of the Millbourne Fire Company or contract with nearby Upper Darby for the same services. Borough officials contend that Upper Darby will provide better protection around the clock at a lower cost.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Millbourne Borough's 81-year-old volunteer fire company may be operating after Jan. 1 without any place to fight fires. The Borough Council voted, 6-0, Monday night to authorize an agreement with neighboring Upper Darby Township that would have two of the township's five volunteer companies cover Millbourne next year. Although terms of a contract between the two municipalities are still to be worked out, borough solicitor George Koudelis left little doubt after the meeting that the intent is to replace the local company to save money.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long-awaited federal highway funding is now available to install fire protection devices on the Blue Route, or Interstate 476, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. The news came as a relief for 16 fire companies along the 21.5-mile highway project who had urged that the roadway be equipped with dry standpipes and fire-hose access holes in noise walls lining the highway. However, the fire officials, who two years ago formed the Blue Route Fire Protection Task Force, continue to insist on installation of emergency call boxes, a feature PennDot believes is unnecessary.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | By Meryll Hansen, Special to The Inquirer
East Bradford supervisors last week agreed to pay West Chester $47,729 each year for the next five years for fire protection in a portion of the township. The Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to approve the assessment. Supervisor John Jordan had been a member of the committee that computed the cost to operate West Chester's fire department over the next 10 years. Each township within West Chester's jurisdiction was assessed a fee based on the property values in the areas the fire company covers.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
The Birmingham supervisors this week voted to give the Concordville Fire Company $11,487 for fire protection. The vote came Monday, six months after the board first considered its annual donation to the Delaware County fire and ambulance company. The company had asked for the money during 1988 as the township's 1989 budget was being prepared. The supervisors had agreed to make the payment but asked Concordville Fire Company officials to provide a breakdown of their request first.
NEWS
December 23, 2010
I SENT a letter to you weeks ago about the lack of fire protection in Frankford. You did not publish it. Now today, three firefighters and one civilian were injured in the area once covered by Engine 14. A quicker application of water on this fire should have been accomplished. The administration will tell you that an apparatus was on scene at a specific time. They will be right. But that fire truck was Ladder 15. They come from the same building where Engine 14 was housed. Also, Ladder 15 has no water for fighting a fire.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
In the midst of an unusually busy committee meeting in West Deptford last week, a bond ordinance was proposed to buy, among other things, two new firetruck pumpers for $535,000. "Wait," said Committeeman Thomas Roberts. "We have two excess pieces of equipment now, and they are pumpers. " What Roberts was referring to is a recent fire protection study that concludes that the township's pumper fleet should be reduced to eight trucks from 10, or two per station. After some discussion, the bond ordinance was approved on first reading with the understanding that the fire equipment purchases merited further discussion.
NEWS
September 17, 2002 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the board of the Philadelphia Museum of Art said yesterday that the museum's staff was working "feverishly" to come up with a fire-protection plan for its basement storage area, but that no date had been set for presentation of the plan to the museum's board. Board chairman H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest estimated that the cost of installing adequate fire-suppression measures to the museum's two-acre, level B storage area would be $8 million to $10 million. He also said he thought the city and state should help defray the cost.
NEWS
July 10, 1995 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With time running out, members of the Rotary Club of Upper Darby are working feverishly to put the final touches on their fund-raising event, the much-debated Devon State Fair. They hope to quickly resolve the parking and fire-protection issues that have been hounding them since residents began denouncing the fair, which starts Thursday at the Devon Horse Show grounds. "We believe that we have done all that we can to make it a good fair that will keep people well-behaved," said Rotary Club of Upper Darby spokesman George Hewitt.
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REAL_ESTATE
December 7, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
When I first became interested in rehabbing older houses, I stumbled on the private, nonprofit Philadelphia Architectural Salvage Ltd., which had a warehouse a couple blocks from Girard College. On occasion, I would accompany the employees on salvaging missions, typically houses that had been condemned by the city, which authorized the expeditions. By the time the salvagers arrived, the houses were in sorry shape and stripped of anything valuable. One house we went into back in 1991 had a tree growing through the kitchen roof, and the living room ceiling was sagging deeply.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Can Atlantic City be a destination resort with fewer cops? Among the proposals posted last week on the website run by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority was "rightsizing" the city's police and fire departments. The recommendation, posted the day after the second city summit led by Gov. Christie, calls for reducing the police department from 330 uniformed employees to 285, and the fire department from 261 to 180. It also brought up the possibility of regionalizing both departments to further save costs.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IN ADVANCE of what one lawmaker expects to be a "blistering" grand-jury report on the deaths of two Philadelphia firefighters, City Councilman Denny O'Brien will introduce a bill today that takes inspecting vacant warehouses a step further. In the early morning of April 9, 2012, a five-alarm fire broke out in an abandoned six-story hosiery warehouse in Kensington. The fire, which engulfed more than half a city block, killed Lt. Robert Neary, 60, and Daniel Sweeney, 25, both of the Fire Department's Ladder 10 station.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
I HAVE LIVED and worked in Philadelphia all my life. I have paid taxes on my home for over 55 years. The only things I have asked for in all that time have been trash removal, safe streets and police and fire protection. Now Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers tells us that updating our EMS system would be "a long, arduous process, a costly process. " Stop telling us why things can't be done - just get them done! And while we're talking about the Fire Department, Mayor Nutter, give the firemen their raises.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Terry Collins, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Firefighters around the West on Friday were taking advantage of improving weather conditions to make strides against stubborn wildfires - even containment in some locales - that have destroyed homes, forced evacuations, and scorched hundreds of thousands of acres of timber and brush. In Redding, Calif., a growing blaze was threatening dozens of homes amid tinder-dry conditions. It erupted into a 2-square-mile fire less than a day after it was spotted. "Even though there are no extreme winds and temperatures, this fire really burned because of how dry the conditions are," said Daniel Berlant, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By P. Solomon Banda, Associated Press
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - When firefighter Eric Morris shows up at wildfires across the West, locals battling the flames sometimes look at him and wonder who sent him. The answer isn't a public agency. It's an insurance company. Morris is among a group of private firefighters hired in recent years to protect homes with high-end insurance policies. In a wildfire season that is one of the most destructive ever to hit the region, authorities and residents say their help is welcome.
NEWS
December 23, 2010
I SENT a letter to you weeks ago about the lack of fire protection in Frankford. You did not publish it. Now today, three firefighters and one civilian were injured in the area once covered by Engine 14. A quicker application of water on this fire should have been accomplished. The administration will tell you that an apparatus was on scene at a specific time. They will be right. But that fire truck was Ladder 15. They come from the same building where Engine 14 was housed. Also, Ladder 15 has no water for fighting a fire.
NEWS
December 15, 2010
RE THE recent letters about "Dancing With the Stars": I don't think that anyone died because Jennifer Grey outscored Bristol Palin. But there's continued death and destruction in Philadelphia due to the fire department cuts. When fire deaths were down, the mayor leaped at the chance to slash fire protection. What will he do now that deaths are on the rise? Raymond Vozzelli, Philadelphia
NEWS
October 6, 2010
Ruling on fish revives dispute WASHINGTON - The Sacramento splittail fish does not warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ruled Tuesday. The decision, denounced by an environmental group, puts the Obama administration on the same side as a Bush administration official who was accused of political interference in dozens of endangered-species cases, including a 2003 decision to remove the Sacramento splittail from the threatened-species list.
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