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Fire Safety

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NEWS
November 12, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fire Chief Allicia Screven is ablaze with pride. She just won top patrol in the city. Allicia, 11, is the leader of the Junior Fire Patrol at the Joseph H. Brown Elementary School at Frankford Avenue and Stanwood Street. Last Thursday, about 30 Brown students won a plaque and Allicia got a trophy declaring the patrol the best in the city. Fourteen other schools also received citations at a luncheon sponsored by the Philadelphia Fire Department and Sears, Roebuck & Co. The function also celebrated the Junior Fire Department's 30th anniversary.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / ELIZABETH VORHAUER
Igniting the night in Cherry Hill, the Deer Park Fire Company and the Board of Fire Commissioners of District 3 sponsored demonstrations in fire prevention Monday. The 23d annual event included simulations by firefighters, the Cherry Hill Tactical Response Team and a Medevac team.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by J. Kyle Keener
Each day at the Northeast fire academy, children ages 6 to 12 from two recreation centers attend the camp, firefighter Frank Squillace said. They will get hands-on experience in fire safety.
NEWS
July 6, 2005 | By Sam J Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the fire alarm began emitting loud beeps, 8-year-old Donna Marie Szajdek knew what to do. She rolled out of bed and crawled toward the door. It was hot when she touched it, so she crawled quickly to the window, waved a handkerchief, and called for help. Luckily for Donna Marie, the experience was only a drill. It was part of the Youth Fire Safety Day Camp, a program run by the Philadelphia Fire Department. Had the scenario been real, the steps the girl practiced could have saved her life.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
When Kristin Kleckner had her sight, fire safety was the last thing that worried her. But her severe vision loss has given her a different perspective - and fear. As a sighted person, Kleckner said, she was taught what sighted people do in case of fire. What a blind or visually impaired person does in a fire emergency is not usually part of the local fire company seminar. "I didn't really care before. Now, I have a fear of being caught in a fire," she said. Kleckner was among 10 people who attended a fire safety program for the blind and visually impaired on Tuesday at the Montgomery County Association for the Blind in Norristown.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
The holiday season is an important time to be wary of fire dangers in and around the house. With the hustle and bustle of the holidays, Philadelphians often use space heaters to warm guests, light candles to decorate rooms and often are too busy to think about replacing smoke detector batteries. It is important to make sure smoke detectors are in working order on each floor of a home, and that family members know at least two escape routes from each room, as well as where to meet once outside and who to call to report the fire.
REAL_ESTATE
May 23, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
This job can be so educational. This week, the lessons involve fire safety in areas around the home in which cooking is done. That could be in the kitchen, or outside at the grill on the patio or the deck. Did you know that every 4.5 minutes, a fire department responds to a kitchen fire? The National Fire Protection Association reported that U.S. fire departments respond to an estimated average of 162,400 home structure fires each year in which cooking equipment is involved. Liberty Mutual Insurance says 45 percent of consumers are distracted by television or music while they are cooking.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Fire Department officials welcome a federal judge's decision requiring five former Delaware County Prison guards to donate hundreds of hours to fire-prevention work in city neighborhoods as punishment for beating troublesome inmates in 1994. "Drastic problems require drastic solutions," said Capt. Henry Dolberry, a spokesman for Fire Commissioner Harold Hairston. U.S. District Judge Raymond J. Broderick said he chose the unusual community service for the five defendants after reading about children's fire deaths in the city this year in homes without smoke detectors.
NEWS
April 21, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
Compliance with a recent state fire-safety law will cost Villanova University as much as $5 million, according to the university's maintenance chief. Immaculata College has already spent $250,000 to meet similar requirements. By May 1989, all institutions in the state that provide group accommodations, including dormitories, must install interconnected fire alarm systems with smoke and heat detectors, according to Jack McGettigan, a spokesman for the state Department of Labor and Industry.
REAL_ESTATE
November 1, 1987 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linda Sturm cringes each time the fire alarm goes off at the Drake Tower. She wonders whether she should get dressed and walk down the steps to the lobby. Or just turn over and go back to sleep. One day, she worries, not going downstairs could prove fatal. False fire alarms have become all too common at the 30-story tower at 1512 Spruce St., the 40-year-old secretary complained. Misbehaving tenants also have thrown fire extinguishers off balconies. And, in one recent incident, Sturm said, a student threatened to spray another resident with an indoor fire hose.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
May 23, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
This job can be so educational. This week, the lessons involve fire safety in areas around the home in which cooking is done. That could be in the kitchen, or outside at the grill on the patio or the deck. Did you know that every 4.5 minutes, a fire department responds to a kitchen fire? The National Fire Protection Association reported that U.S. fire departments respond to an estimated average of 162,400 home structure fires each year in which cooking equipment is involved. Liberty Mutual Insurance says 45 percent of consumers are distracted by television or music while they are cooking.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Philadelphia tallied 12 fire deaths for all of 2015, the fewest ever recorded in the city's modern history. Shortly after 12:01 a.m. on New Year's Day, acting Commissioner Derrick Sawyer made it official on his Twitter account. "We did it. The lowest fire fatalities in the history of the department. #FireIsEveryonesFight," he wrote. The good news may boost Sawyer as a candidate to continue as commissioner under Mayor Kenney, who is the son of a retired firefighter. Kenney has ordered a national search for someone to lead the fifth-largest fire and emergency services department in the country.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph C. Flores, 59, of Northeast Philadelphia, a retired Philadelphia fire official, died Saturday, May 16, at home of unclear causes. Mr. Flores retired as a captain in the Philadelphia Fire Department in 2004 after a 28-year career. A Navy veteran, he was certified as a fire-protection specialist and worked professionally and as a volunteer to prevent fires. During his years with the Fire Department, he specialized in planning for the evacuation of high-risk populations - those in hospitals, assisted-living facilities, nursing homes, schools, high-rise buildings, industrial settings, and day-care centers.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two people were killed in a South Philadelphia rowhouse fire early Thursday and a police officer was injured trying to rescue them, fire officials said. The fire on the 400 block of Daly Street was reported at 1:23 a.m., officials said. Companies had arrived on the scene by 1:27, Fire Department spokesman Chief Clifford Gilliam said, and entered the house shortly afterward. Inside, they found the bodies of a man and a woman in their 60s. Gilliam would not identify them, but residents on the block said their first names were Mickey and Marsha.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
RE: "FOP prez and reporter's ethics" story: Stop crying, you big baby! You're saying the Daily News reporters brought diapers, food and paid utility bills for their sources. When the cops pay their "confidential informants" - yes, pay them - what do you think they do with the money? I bet most of them buy drugs! You can't do it and then bitch when other people do it to get info. They are doing their jobs, like you cops do yours. Bobby LaVelle Philadelphia No lesson plan Just can't understand how executives, like the school superintendent, can use their knowledge and expertise to to further their careers but develop amnesia when they actually get the position.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
EAST OAK LANE All morning Friday, rental trucks and vans pulled up to the curb outside the Oak Lane Gardens condominiums at North 13th Street and 68th Avenue. Residents hurried in and out of the building, hauling their possessions to the sidewalk. The clock was ticking. City workers with hammers and nails waited to board up the doorways of the four-story building at 2 p.m. One man had ripped out his kitchen sink to take away. Another had hauled a refrigerator to the sidewalk.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Councilman Dennis O'Brien blasted the Nutter administration Thursday, saying nothing had been done to address the hazards of vacant buildings like the former Kensington mill that burned in 2012, taking the lives of two firefighters when a wall collapsed. On Thursday, O'Brien introduced a bill calling for a vacant-property task force that would inspect buildings and create a database of information that would be made available to responding firefighters. But administration and fire officials said many of the changes in O'Brien's bill would duplicate efforts underway, and took exception to O'Brien's criticism that "nothing has happened" in response to the Kensington fire.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - A state Senate panel advanced a bill Monday that would require some new houses built in New Jersey to be equipped with an automatic sprinkler system. Supporters of the legislation say sprinklers could save lives at a relatively low price, about 1 percent of the total cost of building the home. The bill requires installation in new single- and two-family homes. More than half of the 85 civilian casualties due to fires in 2012 occurred in single- and two-family homes, according to data from the state Division of Fire Safety.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
The battle against the 11-alarm fire that ravaged a Dietz & Watson warehouse in Delanco last week was hampered by the building's 7,000 solar panels. Fire Chief Ron Holt refused to allow firefighters on the roof for fear that they would be electrocuted. Other fire officials said the chief made the right decision given that the panels continue to generate electricity as long as they're exposed to light, and many models lack an emergency switch. None of that should become an excuse to bash solar power.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Karie Simmons and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writers
A man died and two others were injured in a Southwest Philadelphia house fire late Sunday, officials said. The 11:30 blaze erupted in a property on the 1200 block of South 46th Street. Firefighters on Monday did not release the identity of the deceased. A neighbor, Lola Smith, 63, said she fell asleep Sunday night with the TV on and awoke about midnight to three loud knocks on her front door. A police officer and a neighbor told her there was a fire next door and rushed her and her brother, who has special needs and was upstairs, outside and onto the street, she said.
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