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FOOD
September 4, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In For the Love of Grace, a Hallmark Channel original movie premiering this month, a firefighter who happens to be his station's best cook finds love and redemption in the arms of a cookbook author. The movie is fictional, but the fact remains: Cooking and firefighting go together like linguine and clam sauce (a staple in firehouse kitchens). Philadelphia firefighters in particular have a long, proud tradition of breaking bread together. So when the Hallmark folks decided to create a cookbook of firehouse recipes in conjunction with the movie, they turned to our hometown men and women, at the ready with pasta salads and potato soups, as well as grilled citrus/maple salmon with asparagus and sesame mayonnaise.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | For The Inquirer / JON ADAMS
Firefighters from the Merion Fire Company of Ardmore move garment racks up Greenfield Avenue to their new station house. The company had been quartered in a tent.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
Five firefighters were hospitalized after suffering electrical shocks while fighting a blaze in South Philadelphia Thursday afternoon, Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said. The rowhouse fire occurred near the corner of Garnet and McKean Streets around 5 p.m., Ayers said. Three firefighters were transported to Hahnemann University Hospital and the other two were taken to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Ayers said the firefighters would be kept overnight for observation as a precaution.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
After years of debate, Willingboro will be hiring two professional firefighters to add to its volunteer staff of approximately 70. Township manager Sadie Johnson said the firefighters, who are to drive trucks to daytime calls, were expected to begin work before the end of August, as soon as they passed their physical exams. Each firefighter will receive $26,374 a year, the same starting salary as for a township police officer. That the township hire professional firefighters was "the recommendation of the fire company commissioners who came in at budget time and talked to us about the problems they were having with daytime calls," Mayor Doreatha Campbell said.
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years ago, a Camden firefighter pulled a charred man from a Liberty Street fire, leaving blood on the firefighter's hands and face. The firefighter, who now suffers from Hepatitis B, suspects he may have contracted the disease from the victim's body fluids and blood. But, because the fire victim died, there is no way to prove that the firefighter contracted the disease on the job. And the firefighter, who declined to be identified, still has relapses of the disease, becoming jaundiced and weak.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
Five firefighters were hospitalized after their vehicle overturned Wednesday night in Burlington County, authorities said. Their injuries were not life-threatening. The accident occurred at 7:33 p.m. at Route 38 and Smithville Road in Lumberton, authorities said. The vehicle was identified as Engine 1311 of Lumberton Fire Company No. 1. The firefighters were transported to Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly and Lourdes Medical Center in Willingboro. There was no immediate word on the cause of the accident.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
The days of fire poles, dalmations and clanging bells are over. Today's firefighters could soon be banned from riding on the backs of the hook and ladders. In response to a federal government recommendation, West Chester's Goodwill Fire Company has bought a former ambulance and will convert it into a "firefighter transporter. " David Smiley of the Goodwill Fire Company said he expects the recommendation to be passed into a law that would require all firefighters to be wearing seat belts to and from fires.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | BY ORLANDO A. JEWETT
I am a City of Philadelphia firefighter. I am writing this letter in regard to Mayor Rendell's proposal to City Council and the PICA board that all city workers take a pay freeze for four years and accept cuts in their health and holiday benefits. This letter is not the view of the Fire Department nor its employees. It is not my intention to express the department's views on this proposal, but to give a personal opinion. Why do city employees have to make the biggest sacrifices?
NEWS
April 25, 2006 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four firefighters and a battalion chief were rushed to the hospital after they were shocked, likely by downed electrical wires, as they were fighting a three-alarm blaze in West Philadelphia early yesterday. Two of the injured were admitted for overnight treatment. The other three were treated and released, Executive Fire Chief Daniel Williams said. Authorities ruled out lightning as the cause and said they believed the shock was caused by live wires that had fallen during the fire and came in contact with a ladder truck.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writers
A funeral service for firefighter Joyce Craig-Lewis is set for Saturday, Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer said Wednesday. The service will be at 10 a.m. at Batchelor Bros. Funeral Services, 7112 N. Broad St., he said. Burial will follow at Ivy Hill Cemetery. Craig-Lewis, a decorated 11-year veteran and mother of two, was fatally injured in a predawn fire in West Oak Lane on Tuesday. She was working an overtime shift when the call for a fire on Middleton Street came in to Engine 73 around 2:30 a.m. She was trapped while fighting a basement fire.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Martha Woodall and Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writers
She wasn't even supposed to be working. Philadelphia Firefighter Joyce Craig-Lewis, who died in a house fire in West Oak Lane on Tuesday morning, had not been scheduled to be on Engine 73 fighting the blaze, according to family and friends. But Craig-Lewis, 36, loved the job, said her son, Mekhi Green, 16. So she signed up for an overtime shift. "She worked a lot," her son said Tuesday afternoon in the family's Northeast living room, where people took turns caring for her 16-month-old daughter, Laylani.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Chris Hepp, and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
As intense heat and smoke poured from the blazing basement of a house in West Oak Lane early Tuesday, the firefighters attacking the flames with a hose were ordered to get out. The woman who lived there had been rescued. Another company was poised to go in through a back entrance to fight the flames. With conditions deteriorating, a commanding officer had said over the radio around 2:30 a.m. that that would be safer. The firefighters began to retreat as directed, battling disorienting heat and blinding smoke.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, MORGAN ZALOT, DAVID GAMBACORTA & MENSAH DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN THEY are older, and showing their own children photo albums that have far too many blank spaces, Mehki Donte Green and Laylani Lewis will say that their mother died a hero on a soggy, bitterly cold day in Philadelphia. Their mom, veteran Philadelphia Firefighter Joyce Craig-Lewis, lost her life while battling a hellacious blaze in West Oak Lane in the early morning darkness yesterday, earning a heartbreaking place in the city's history as the first female firefighter to die in the line of duty.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
ALBERTO GONZALEZ knew what he'd be doing first thing yesterday morning when he heard the news. "Did you hear that?" his wife asked. "I think they said a firefighter died. " Gonzalez sat up in bed and focused on the newscast. Joyce Craig-Lewis, an 11-year veteran of the Philadelphia Fire Department and mother of two, died early yesterday morning after being trapped in the basement of a burning West Oak Lane rowhouse. She was the city's first female firefighter killed in the line of duty.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, Dec. 6, for William Collier, 80, of Buckingham Township, a teacher and firefighter who died Wednesday, Nov. 12, at Doylestown Hospital of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The 11 a.m. service will take place at the Bux-Mont Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2040 W. Street Rd., Warrington. Burial is private. "Bill," as he was called, first taught in the Maple Shade School District in 1957. Later, he joined the Hatboro-Horsham School District and spent 37 years as a social studies teacher.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Atlantic City firefighter fell through the floor of an abandoned rowhouse, and two others were injured, as they rescued a woman from a two-alarm blaze less than an hour after their Thanksgiving meal Thursday. The blaze ignited around 6:55 p.m. on a block of abandoned rowhouses, the windows and doors covered with plywood, along Lighthouse Court. Investigators are calling the blaze suspicious - there was no working electricity or heat in the home that could have caused it. When firefighters arrived at the home, they had to rip off plywood and cut it with a saw, Atlantic City Fire Chief Dennis J. Brooks said Friday.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A 55-YEAR-OLD MAN who was involved in an accident that killed an off-duty Philadelphia firefighter was sentenced yesterday to 30 to 60 days in county jail. Teddy Wilson had been convicted of DUI by Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner, and acquitted of homicide by vehicle and involuntary manslaughter. "This was a very, very difficult case to try," the judge said yesterday. After reviewing witness accounts, "I am absolutely convinced in a system where the commonwealth bears the burden . . . there was absolutely no way any fair fact finder could determine . . . who was responsible for this accident.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Chambers was the right person with the right training at the right time. And a Philadelphia police officer could owe his life to that. About 5:20 p.m. Saturday, the 17-year-old high school senior from Ridley Park was watching an episode of Cops while visiting his sister on Tasker Street in Grays Ferry when he heard a loud bang. "I know the sound of an accident," said Chambers, who doubles as a volunteer firefighter. "I jumped right up. " When he peered out the window at the corner of 28th and Tasker Streets, he saw a police cruiser throwing sparks and leaking fluids - the result of a collision with a black pickup truck.
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