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Fireplace

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NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Considering it was only a two-day getaway, we sure got our 48 hours' worth: The setting was informal and friendly and cozy, the food nonpareil - and the fire was hypnotic. As a Christmas gift for my pregnant wife, Valerie, I had offered her a quiet winter weekend away from the children - our first trip without them in four years. What I had in mind was a bed-and-breakfast or small inn with its own restaurant, serving full country breakfasts and gourmet dinners. Someplace with a cozy pub where we could get something to drink and chat with other guests or maybe the owners.
LIVING
January 20, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I want to get a wood-burning fireplace, the kind with the soapstone that will radiate heat. I know there are simpler and cheaper installation and maintenance choices. But I love that smell, as well as the sight, of a wood fire, and with the radiant heat of the soapstone, I would think that would be an attractive adjunct to the price of heating. My house is 125 years old and in Fishtown. One estimate I received was for $10,000, even though there is a chimney with three flues, one of which is the exhaust for the heater.
FOOD
December 25, 2008 | By Bonnie Walker, SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS
REAL_ESTATE
March 12, 2000 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The advent of central heating in the late 19th century was supposed to have made fireplaces obsolete. Then why does everyone - new-house owner and old-house owner alike - seem to want a fireplace? "In California, you cannot sell a house without a fireplace, even though you probably don't need one more than three days a year," said Gopal Ahluwahlia, director of research for the National Association of Home Builders. Just as is the case with almost every other amenity in the 21st-century American house, the demand for fireplaces centers on something called "lifestyle.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question : We bought a house last year that had a beautiful vented gas fireplace. However, we were told it was in need of a new chimney flue. Because replacing the flue was so expensive, we were told by chimney people that we could seal off the chimney and change to a ventless gas-log set. When I went to a gas fireplace store, they told us that it was unsafe to put ventless logs in a fireplace with the flue sealed off and that we would have to open the window slightly when using the ventless logs.
NEWS
October 15, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We had a fireplace built in our living room in 1976. It is a grayish brick, but the bricks are not flat; they're bumpy to look more like stone. We have not used the fireplace in many years. Now the bricks at the bottom of the fireplace are starting to disintegrate. The outside surface is crumbling into a white powder, and the inside seems to be made of this white powder also. What is causing this, and what can we do to prevent it happening to all the bricks? Answer : It's likely moisture is causing the bricks to crumble.
REAL_ESTATE
October 21, 1990 | By Al Carrell, Special to The Inquirer
The man who cleaned our chimney said we needed to tend to some loose mortar joints before using the fireplace this winter. What exactly is involved in repairing the joints? Do a thorough inspection of the fireplace to make sure you find all of the loose joints. If you're going to do the repair work, you might as well do all of it at once. Loose joints can be extremely dangerous and should be repaired before you light a fire. To begin, you will need to remove the loose mortar.
LIVING
March 26, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I have a gas fireplace that, when turned on, has an odor of gas (or an odor that I think gas would smell like). What is it and what can I do to get rid of that horrible smell? I've had the fireplace for four years. Answer: Proper maintenance is an issue with just about everything, and if your fireplace has begun giving off a horrible smell when it is turned on after four years of use, I would suggest contacting the manufacturer or the installer directly and immediately for advice for your make or model, and not using the fireplace again until you have an answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
It's still cold. And sometimes a little damp. And even if we haven't gotten those multi-feet snowstorms this year, the cold is still hanging on. Who wouldn't want to curl up next to a warm, roaring fire? If you don't have a fireplace of your own - or just don't want to deal with chopping and dragging wood - take a break at one of the region's many bars, restaurants and coffee spots where the best view is of the hearth. Three Beans Coffee Co. 140 N. Haddon Ave., Haddonfield, 856-354-4751 This coffeehouse is like a home away from home.
LIVING
September 18, 1998 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The Swann Lounge at Philadelphia's Four Seasons Hotel earlier this year was regarded by readers of Gourmet magazine as the top bar in the world. So it hardly is a hole in the wall. But adding a fireplace to the elegant hotel bar meant lots of holes - one big one in the wall of the lounge and at least eight more in the bathroom walls of the rooms above that. And let's not forget the hole in the roof, cut through 18 inches of concrete. If you want to add a wood-burning fireplace to a 15-year-old hotel, you have to put the flue someplace, right?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
June 27, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 2007, Mark Alter and Margi Shah, who had been living in Brooklyn, began looking for a larger home in suburban Philadelphia, near her family. Margi had two stipulations: "I didn't want a sideways house or a house without a mudroom. " Side entrances, common in area homes, seemed awkward to Margi, who grew up in Newtown Square. She favored a front door facing the street. And a mudroom was essential because she and Mark have two young daughters. The couple, both psychiatrists, house-hunted for a year.
REAL_ESTATE
May 22, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
It is difficult to visit the home of Margaret Meigs and Paul Laskow without recognizing their passion for the Schuylkill and sharing their concern for the river's future. The couple's 2,000-square-foot condominium in Queen Village seems to be dedicated to promoting the Schuylkill even though Philadelphia's western waterway is about two miles west of their new home. Their thoughts are never far from the river. Not only do the couple get up at 5 a.m. each day to row on the Schuylkill, but their aqua living-room rug was custom-designed to show the patterns of the river with its bends and borders housing the boathouses.
REAL_ESTATE
December 14, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Even from the street, Joyce and Donald Sico's Tudor on a corner in Riverton leaves no doubt that the holiday season is upon us. From its front porch to its upstairs balconies, the house is ablaze with lights that suggest a warm glow indoors as well. But seeing is believing, and a visit a few weeks before Christmas reveals a holiday enchantment inside that has been spun gracefully, without overpowering the home's innate charm. Joyce, 62, and Donald, 61, are both from New York state.
REAL_ESTATE
May 24, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, I replied to a reader's question about "ghost shadows" on his ceiling. It isn't as spooky as it sounds. The reader was asking about paint he could use to hide the lines, which reappeared after he had painted the ceiling three years ago. Of course, I responded to his request for a paint recommendation by suggesting a shellac-based product that I have used to cover water stains from leaks that have been repaired and to keep...
REAL_ESTATE
February 22, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps it's the bitter memory of last winter's polar vortex, or maybe it's just the volatile price of fuel, but homeowners are warming to fireplaces. Contractors and architects say their home-renovation and new-construction customers are eager to include fireplaces of all kinds in their projects - gas inserts, wood-burning, electric units that double as house heaters, even outdoor fireplaces. Ed Barnhart, principal at Always by Design architects and designers in Center City, recently contracted with two buyers of new houses.
REAL_ESTATE
January 11, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I've never been interested in animal husbandry, so it was with great interest that I recently learned that deer - which don't actually qualify as domestic animals, even though they live in our neighborhoods - mate in cold weather. That information is courtesy of Bobbex, maker of what it describes as natural deer repellents. Mating makes deer more active and aggressive, and a greater threat to humans, pets, and suburban landscapes, the company says. Moving to the city won't help - in Chestnut Hill, Mount Airy, and Andorra, there seem to be more deer than people on some mornings.
REAL_ESTATE
March 17, 2014 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
The trio of Colonials in Queen Village is as charming as a storybook illustration. Indeed, the transformation of the once-tumbledown dwellings is a family saga. Ann Foringer now lives in one of the end houses with husband Scott and daughter, Mai, 17. Previously, the structure was occupied by Ann's parents, Homer and Helen Rhule, who bought it in the mid-1980s. "My father was offered a job in Center City, and my parents decided to relocate" from Westfield, N.J., Ann said. "Mother wanted to restore a house - the older the better.
REAL_ESTATE
February 10, 2014 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Samy Badawy and wife Toby Shawe were expecting their third child in 1994 and living in a small house in Roxborough. They needed more space, and each had priorities for a new home. "Samy wanted light," Shawe said, "and I wanted our bedroom to be separate from the kids' bedrooms. " The couple found a light-filled, mid-century-modern house with separate sleeping wings and much more in the nearby Wissahickon section of Roxborough. Arthur M. Tofani Jr. had designed the futuristic home on a sloping lot in 1949, just two years after he earned a degree in architecture from the University of Pennsylvania.
REAL_ESTATE
November 17, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: Our house was built in 1898. I am told we cannot use our fireplace unless we install a sleeve that would cost $3,000 to $6,000. As an alternative, is there such a thing as a gas-fired Franklin stove-type insert that could be put in without venting or, perhaps, with an exhaust pipe up the chimney? Since the fireplace is smack in the middle of the house, an insert could provide a true heat benefit. But I would prefer not to risk asphyxiation. Your guidance will be greatly appreciated.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Andrew Wyeth died four years ago at 91; in another four years, the centennial of his birth will bring forth a major retrospective exhibition at the Brandywine River Museum, designed not only to commemorate his remarkable career, but also to reevaluate it. The museum has set in motion a five-year sequence of events to set the stage for the centennial celebration in 2017. It wants these events to accomplish two things - introduce Wyeth and the other artists in his family to a new, younger audience, and encourage art historians to reconsider what the Wyeth artists accomplished.
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