FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three of Lower Gwynedd's largest industries made presentations to the township Board of Supervisors Tuesday night opposing an ordinance that would tighten zoning restrictions in commercial and industrial districts. Lawyers for Rohm & Haas, McNeil Pharmaceuticals and Hansen Properties argued that the proposed ordinance was too restrictive and would impair their ability to operate their businesses. The ordinance, which was proposed by Lower Gwynedd zoning officer Joseph Zadlo in November, calls for increased yard setback requirements and more stringent lighting regulations and prohibits businesses from using hazardous chemicals on their property.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer (Daily News wire services contributed to this report.)
Several local firms and dozens of national companies have moved into the stock market, pumping hundreds of millions of dollars into Wall Street to snap up shares of their own stocks. Some firms are buying back their own shares to take advantage of what they deemed to be bargain prices. Some are buying as a way to bolster confidence in their long-term business prospects. And others are moving into the market defensively, putting more shares into friendly hands and supporting the prices, lest corporate raiders scoop up their suddenly cheaper shares.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Toni Locy contributed to this report.)
An Atlantic City construction company allegedly used as a "sanctuary" for criminal activities by members of the Scarfo crime family could be seized by New Jersey authorities. Scarf Inc., run by Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, the alleged No. 2 man in the organization led by Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo, was named in indictments made public yesterday, along with Scarfo, Leonetti and 16 other reputed crime figures. A New Jersey grand jury said Scarf Inc. was used as a "sanctuary for meetings pertaining to the operation, conduct and control" of illegal activities.
NEWS
June 30, 2011
Two old-line Philadelphia printers, Smith-Edwards-Dunlap Co. and Graphic Arts Inc., said Thursday they have merged their operations and now operate out of the Smith-Edwards-Dunlap plant in Port Richmond. The combined operation has 130 workers and there are no major layoffs planned, said Jonathan Shapiro, president of the merged company. He said combining the companies allowed the printers to benefit from economies of scale and stay in Philadelphia. Each company will continue to sell and market its products under its name.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Forty-four percent of corporate executives surveyed by Atlas Van Lines believe the economy will improve in 2012, the moving company said Wednesday. Of 360 executives completing the first-quarter survey, 26 percent said their firms plan to relocate more workers this year than last, while 86 percent of companies will spend as much or more on relocation in 2012 than in 2011. After progressively declining over the past two years, 65 percent of firms are offering relocated employees full reimbursement, far more often than lump sum or partial reimbursement, the Atlas survey showed.
REAL_ESTATE
August 9, 1987 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Leonard thinks small, a philosophy that has made a small fortune for him in real estate. His Haddonfield firm, Roney, Vermaat & Leonard, lacks the advertising budget of the Century 21 franchise offices and the thousands of sales agents that Coldwell Banker Real Estate Group boasts coast-to-coast. He doesn't have it, and he doesn't want it. It is by design that this nine-year-old company has only one office. Daydreams here are not about expansion. Why should they be, asked Leonard, noting so far this year his realty's 20 agents have brought home $21 million in sales.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1991 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
The accounting profession is under siege, its cash flow battered by economic downturn, its image tarnished by the Laventhol & Horwath collapse. The legal profession is in turmoil, with demand for legal services, particularly in real estate and corporate work, on the wane. Amid such turbulence, some professional firms are busting up. Others have gone belly up. But a handful have chosen a third route: counseling. To save their firms, or keep them from getting into trouble in the first place, they are turning to a new kind of consultant, the consulting psychologist.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
Resource America Inc., of Philadelphia, has agreed to combine one of its asset management units, Apidos Capital Management L.L.C., with CVC Cordatus Group to form CVC Credit Partners, which will have $7.5 billion in loans and other credit-related assets under management, the two companies said Wednesday. For its contribution of Apidos, which had $5.5 billion in assets under management on Sept. 30, Resource America will receive $25 million in cash and a 33 percent ownership interested in CVC Credit partners.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a nonprofit company like Biosciences Information Service (Biosis), it might seem a bit extravagant to invest almost $500 for a booth at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's two-day Operation Native Talent conference. The 60-year-old Philadelphia firm, which employs about 350, is the world's largest abstracting and indexing service for the life sciences, but one of the smallest companies taking part in the annual jobs' fair. The conference, held yesterday and today at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza hotel, brings together more than 6,000 college seniors and recent graduates with about 90 would-be employers.
NEWS
April 15, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Real jobs, real pay, real chances for advancement: sound good? That's what Thursday's 12th annual Great Valley Job Fair will be about, according to Cherie Wright, spokeswoman for the Business Development and Training Center at Great Valley. A record 90 area companies will send representatives to talk to the 2,000-plus candidates expected, said Wright. Based on past years, she estimated, 200 to 300 people are likely to find employment through the event. "It really is all career fields," she added.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 9, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Venture capitalist Bruce Luehrs , who weighed startups and pitched investors for Princeton's pioneering Edison Venture Fund back in the dot-com boom, is back on the road. He says he wishes he had more competitors. "We're an honest-to-God Philadelphia early-stage venture fund," Luehrs told me about his latest pile, $18 million Rittenhouse Ventures II , which includes $4 million in funding from state sources and Ben Franklin Technology Partners. Rittenhouse Ventures I is the current name for the 2008 fund formerly known as Emerald Stage2 Ventures , which Luehrs started in 2008 with partner Saul Richter , backing from Joe Besecker 's Emerald Asset Management , and millions more in state funding.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The word audit usually conjures a boring - and sometimes terrifying - tableau of invoices, spreadsheets, and calculators. But ask Robert Bright about a construction audit that his Philadelphia firm, Talson Solutions L.L.C., just wrapped, and he breaks out a slideshow of what could be mistaken for an exotic vacation. International locales: Italy, South Korea, and China, to name a few. Pictures of waterways and massive ships. Bands and celebratory fireworks. They're scenes of a job like no other for the 15-year-old boutique firm in Old City: the $5.2 billion Panama Canal expansion.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Penn National Gaming Inc. bought Rocket Games Inc., a San Franciso developer of social casino games, for $60 million in cash, plus potential incentive payments to certain Rocket executives over the next two years, the Wyomissing, Pa., casino operator said Wednesday. Among Rocket's 50 social casino games is Viva Slots Vegas, which has an audience of more than 200,000 daily players, according to Penn National, whose Penn Interactive Ventures is based in Conshohocken and operates www.hollywoodcasino.com , HollywoodSlots.com, and Hollywoodraces.com.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Most law firms would consider it noteworthy if just one of their cases became a front-page story. But for Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis, the Center City law firm, that has happened three times in recent months. Given the notoriety of the matters - all are criminal cases - they likely will remain in the public eye for some time. Schnader's lawyers have gone to bat for former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, who is expected to appeal his conviction in June on federal corruption charges; former Pennsylvania State University president Graham Spanier, who is fending off criminal charges that he failed to go to the police with evidence that former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky had sexually assaulted a minor; and comedian Bill Cosby, who is facing sexual-assault charges in Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
A Horsham company that provides bedside X-rays and other diagnostic services will move 63 call-center jobs to Clearwater, Fla., in September. About 100 people will remain in the Horsham office of MobilexUSA, Mary Berberich, a sales support supervisor in Horsham, said Friday. The layoff announcement was posted Thursday on the Pennsylvania Department of Labor's web site. The Horsham call center employees have been offered the chance to relocate, and MobilexUSA's human resources department is trying to find jobs for them in other local call centers, Berberich said.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Tech firm Archetype Solutions is moving its headquarters from Trevose to a 7,300-square-foot space in Center City, according to PernaFrederick Commercial Real Estate, which negotiated the lease. Archetype, which specializes in sales analytics, is relocating to the new space at 2124 Race Street to aid in its recruitment efforts, PernaFrederick broker Joe Viturello said in the Thursday release. Staff are moving from the existing headquarters at 3160 Tremont Avenue in Trevose and another location at 899 Cassatt Road in Berwyn.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Outsourcing specialist Ashfield Commercial & Medical Services is moving its headquarters from Ivyland to an 80,000-square-foot space in Fort Washington to accommodate a continuing expansion, the company said in a release on Thursday. Ashfield, a unit of UDG Healthcare PLC, is moving to the new location following the growth of its workforce to 1500 members from 120 in 2007, the company said. The Fort Washington space is 60 percent larger than the previous location. The new headquarters will feature an auditorium, a full-service cafeteria and other amenities, Ashfield said.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Internet-marketing firm Sidecar will lease 15,550 square feet at the One South Broad office building to accommodate an expansion, SSH Real Estate said in a release on Monday. Sidecar is consolidating from a 3,500-square-foot space at 114 S. 13th St. and a 2,400-square-foot temporary office at 123 S. Broad St., according to SSH, which represented the company in the lease. Clients of Sidecar, which uses predictive technologies to help retailers optimize results on search engines and shopping sites, include Under Armour, Century 21 and Newegg.com, according to its website.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Of all the tantalizing strands in the now declassified report on the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks is the testimony of an FBI agent that a suspected actor in the plot had many contacts with the head of air traffic control in Saudi Arabia. The implication: What better way to suss out weaknesses of the U.S. civil aviation system before the hijackings than to confer with an expert. For years, the government of Saudi Arabia dismissed claims in a lawsuit that it had something to do with the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: Today, my parents informed me (not asking) that they're coming to town for a month when my second baby is born, renting a place nearby as we have no room in our city apartment. I said, "Honestly, that's a little long, two or three weeks would be better," and they, mostly my mom, got totally huffy and said a bunch of stuff like, "We have a right to come to your city whenever we want," "We have lots of friends here," and "You don't have to entertain us" (yeah, right), "This is baffling," "You're being ridiculous.
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