FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three of Lower Gwynedd's largest industries made presentations to the township Board of Supervisors Tuesday night opposing an ordinance that would tighten zoning restrictions in commercial and industrial districts. Lawyers for Rohm & Haas, McNeil Pharmaceuticals and Hansen Properties argued that the proposed ordinance was too restrictive and would impair their ability to operate their businesses. The ordinance, which was proposed by Lower Gwynedd zoning officer Joseph Zadlo in November, calls for increased yard setback requirements and more stringent lighting regulations and prohibits businesses from using hazardous chemicals on their property.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer (Daily News wire services contributed to this report.)
Several local firms and dozens of national companies have moved into the stock market, pumping hundreds of millions of dollars into Wall Street to snap up shares of their own stocks. Some firms are buying back their own shares to take advantage of what they deemed to be bargain prices. Some are buying as a way to bolster confidence in their long-term business prospects. And others are moving into the market defensively, putting more shares into friendly hands and supporting the prices, lest corporate raiders scoop up their suddenly cheaper shares.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Toni Locy contributed to this report.)
An Atlantic City construction company allegedly used as a "sanctuary" for criminal activities by members of the Scarfo crime family could be seized by New Jersey authorities. Scarf Inc., run by Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, the alleged No. 2 man in the organization led by Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo, was named in indictments made public yesterday, along with Scarfo, Leonetti and 16 other reputed crime figures. A New Jersey grand jury said Scarf Inc. was used as a "sanctuary for meetings pertaining to the operation, conduct and control" of illegal activities.
NEWS
June 30, 2011
Two old-line Philadelphia printers, Smith-Edwards-Dunlap Co. and Graphic Arts Inc., said Thursday they have merged their operations and now operate out of the Smith-Edwards-Dunlap plant in Port Richmond. The combined operation has 130 workers and there are no major layoffs planned, said Jonathan Shapiro, president of the merged company. He said combining the companies allowed the printers to benefit from economies of scale and stay in Philadelphia. Each company will continue to sell and market its products under its name.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Forty-four percent of corporate executives surveyed by Atlas Van Lines believe the economy will improve in 2012, the moving company said Wednesday. Of 360 executives completing the first-quarter survey, 26 percent said their firms plan to relocate more workers this year than last, while 86 percent of companies will spend as much or more on relocation in 2012 than in 2011. After progressively declining over the past two years, 65 percent of firms are offering relocated employees full reimbursement, far more often than lump sum or partial reimbursement, the Atlas survey showed.
REAL_ESTATE
August 9, 1987 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Leonard thinks small, a philosophy that has made a small fortune for him in real estate. His Haddonfield firm, Roney, Vermaat & Leonard, lacks the advertising budget of the Century 21 franchise offices and the thousands of sales agents that Coldwell Banker Real Estate Group boasts coast-to-coast. He doesn't have it, and he doesn't want it. It is by design that this nine-year-old company has only one office. Daydreams here are not about expansion. Why should they be, asked Leonard, noting so far this year his realty's 20 agents have brought home $21 million in sales.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1991 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
The accounting profession is under siege, its cash flow battered by economic downturn, its image tarnished by the Laventhol & Horwath collapse. The legal profession is in turmoil, with demand for legal services, particularly in real estate and corporate work, on the wane. Amid such turbulence, some professional firms are busting up. Others have gone belly up. But a handful have chosen a third route: counseling. To save their firms, or keep them from getting into trouble in the first place, they are turning to a new kind of consultant, the consulting psychologist.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
Resource America Inc., of Philadelphia, has agreed to combine one of its asset management units, Apidos Capital Management L.L.C., with CVC Cordatus Group to form CVC Credit Partners, which will have $7.5 billion in loans and other credit-related assets under management, the two companies said Wednesday. For its contribution of Apidos, which had $5.5 billion in assets under management on Sept. 30, Resource America will receive $25 million in cash and a 33 percent ownership interested in CVC Credit partners.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a nonprofit company like Biosciences Information Service (Biosis), it might seem a bit extravagant to invest almost $500 for a booth at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's two-day Operation Native Talent conference. The 60-year-old Philadelphia firm, which employs about 350, is the world's largest abstracting and indexing service for the life sciences, but one of the smallest companies taking part in the annual jobs' fair. The conference, held yesterday and today at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza hotel, brings together more than 6,000 college seniors and recent graduates with about 90 would-be employers.
NEWS
April 15, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Real jobs, real pay, real chances for advancement: sound good? That's what Thursday's 12th annual Great Valley Job Fair will be about, according to Cherie Wright, spokeswoman for the Business Development and Training Center at Great Valley. A record 90 area companies will send representatives to talk to the 2,000-plus candidates expected, said Wright. Based on past years, she estimated, 200 to 300 people are likely to find employment through the event. "It really is all career fields," she added.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Political consultants in suburban Philadelphia and Washington have joined forces to turn Uber 's "first ride free" program into a platform to help candidates' campaigns, issue groups, and other get-out-the-vote efforts target likely supporters and bring them to the polls Nov. 8, through a site they're calling VoterDrive.us. Uber offers up to $10 off your first ride. The company has, in previous elections, expanded the break on election days in the United States and in cities in Canada, India, South Africa and other countries as a way of attracting new users and appearing public-spirited.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: I am 32, married for a year and a half, with no children yet. I am an only child who was raised by my mother until I was 14 because my father was in prison. My mother never remarried. She blames me for her never having found anyone, and she is resentful of my marriage. She doesn't get along with anyone, not family, co-workers or "friends. " She thinks my husband is her handyman to use around her house. The reality is, my husband works all the time, and when he does have any free time, I either want to spend it with him or need him to do things around our home.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Local businesses with overseas operations are grappling with the June 23 decision of British voters to exit the European Union, and the result has greatly complicated long-range planning. Law firms with a London presence predicted shortly after the vote that uncertainty, possibly for years, would follow. But the full range of strategic issues raised by the British vote is only now coming into focus. "Overall, from a business standpoint it makes both short- and long-term planning very difficult," said Kathy J. Wyrofsky, president of International Products Corp., a maker of specialty cleaners and assembly lubricants based in Burlington, N.J. The company has a facility in south London and has used the U.K. as a platform for selling into the European Union.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
The management books all preach it - one toxic worker can spoil an entire barrel of apples, to mangle a metaphor. But does that proverb need to be taken on faith? Not at M&S Centerless Grinding Inc., a precision metal working shop in Hatboro. "Most of the time you can't measure this," said company owner John Shegda. "But this was at a great time for us, to be able to put some numbers on it. " Getting rid of one bad apple, plus two of his crew, increased productivity by more than a third at M&S Centerless Grinding, even though the one bad apple was the most productive worker/supervisor in the whole factory and led three highly-productive workers.
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Kee Hyung Lee, 84, a former business manager for petroleum firms in Philadelphia, died of cancer Sunday, Aug. 21, at the assisted living community CareOne at Moorestown. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Mr. Lee joined his nation's army in 1950, as the Korean conflict began, and earned the rank of major. For a year in the 1950s, he studied at what is now Anderson University, a private Indiana college affiliated with the Church of God. He returned to South Korea and earned his bachelor's at Seoul National University.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Cinven Partners L.L.P., an international private equity firm, announced Tuesday that it will acquire Doylestown-based Bioclinica Inc., which assists pharmaceutical companies and contract research organizations (CROs) in patient clinical trials. Financial terms were not disclosed. Reuters reported that sources said the deal was valued at about $1.4 billion, including debt. Cinven is acquiring Bioclinica - which will remain in Doylestown - from two other firms, Water Street Healthcare Partners and JLL Partners.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The same group that invested in Uber - and proudly claims it has disrupted the taxi and limo business - will soon, through one of its companies, open an office in Philadelphia with the aim of disrupting recruitment in niche fields of technology. TPG Growth, which has invested in Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify, is the majority owner of Frank Recruitment Group, the British-based company that chose Philadelphia for its third U.S. office. "You have a high density of bright college graduates who are up for a challenge," said Frank chief executive James Lloyd Townshend, explaining why his company picked Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Darren Hill has powered his office computer and assorted peripheral equipment for two years from a solar panel mounted to the roof of his Old City business. "I proved the model, now let's just do the whole building," said Hill, 40, the chief executive and cofounder of e-commerce platform provider WebLinc L.L.C. On Tuesday, a contractor completed installation of a 12-kilowatt solar array on the roof of 100 Market St., one of three Old City locations where WebLinc's creative teams devise tools for online retailers.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Venture capitalist Bruce Luehrs , who weighed startups and pitched investors for Princeton's pioneering Edison Venture Fund back in the dot-com boom, is back on the road. He says he wishes he had more competitors. "We're an honest-to-God Philadelphia early-stage venture fund," Luehrs told me about his latest pile, $18 million Rittenhouse Ventures II , which includes $4 million in funding from state sources and Ben Franklin Technology Partners. Rittenhouse Ventures I is the current name for the 2008 fund formerly known as Emerald Stage2 Ventures , which Luehrs started in 2008 with partner Saul Richter , backing from Joe Besecker 's Emerald Asset Management , and millions more in state funding.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The word audit usually conjures a boring - and sometimes terrifying - tableau of invoices, spreadsheets, and calculators. But ask Robert Bright about a construction audit that his Philadelphia firm, Talson Solutions L.L.C., just wrapped, and he breaks out a slideshow of what could be mistaken for an exotic vacation. International locales: Italy, South Korea, and China, to name a few. Pictures of waterways and massive ships. Bands and celebratory fireworks. They're scenes of a job like no other for the 15-year-old boutique firm in Old City: the $5.2 billion Panama Canal expansion.
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