FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 30, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Competition for clients in the rough-and-tumble world of personal-injury law in Philadelphia, intense even during the best of times, is getting sharper. And playing out on SEPTA buses near you. Two of the city's better-known players in that space now are locked in a bitter antitrust battle. One firm is accusing the other of using underhanded and illegal tactics to lock up advertising on SEPTA buses, at the Wells Fargo Center, and on KYW radio, among other spots. In a lawsuit filed in federal District Court in Philadelphia, Larry Pitt & Associates, itself a prodigious advertiser, accuses competitor Lundy Law of violating the Sherman Antitrust Act by illegally signing exclusive ad contracts.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three of Lower Gwynedd's largest industries made presentations to the township Board of Supervisors Tuesday night opposing an ordinance that would tighten zoning restrictions in commercial and industrial districts. Lawyers for Rohm & Haas, McNeil Pharmaceuticals and Hansen Properties argued that the proposed ordinance was too restrictive and would impair their ability to operate their businesses. The ordinance, which was proposed by Lower Gwynedd zoning officer Joseph Zadlo in November, calls for increased yard setback requirements and more stringent lighting regulations and prohibits businesses from using hazardous chemicals on their property.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer (Daily News wire services contributed to this report.)
Several local firms and dozens of national companies have moved into the stock market, pumping hundreds of millions of dollars into Wall Street to snap up shares of their own stocks. Some firms are buying back their own shares to take advantage of what they deemed to be bargain prices. Some are buying as a way to bolster confidence in their long-term business prospects. And others are moving into the market defensively, putting more shares into friendly hands and supporting the prices, lest corporate raiders scoop up their suddenly cheaper shares.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Toni Locy contributed to this report.)
An Atlantic City construction company allegedly used as a "sanctuary" for criminal activities by members of the Scarfo crime family could be seized by New Jersey authorities. Scarf Inc., run by Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, the alleged No. 2 man in the organization led by Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo, was named in indictments made public yesterday, along with Scarfo, Leonetti and 16 other reputed crime figures. A New Jersey grand jury said Scarf Inc. was used as a "sanctuary for meetings pertaining to the operation, conduct and control" of illegal activities.
NEWS
June 30, 2011
Two old-line Philadelphia printers, Smith-Edwards-Dunlap Co. and Graphic Arts Inc., said Thursday they have merged their operations and now operate out of the Smith-Edwards-Dunlap plant in Port Richmond. The combined operation has 130 workers and there are no major layoffs planned, said Jonathan Shapiro, president of the merged company. He said combining the companies allowed the printers to benefit from economies of scale and stay in Philadelphia. Each company will continue to sell and market its products under its name.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Forty-four percent of corporate executives surveyed by Atlas Van Lines believe the economy will improve in 2012, the moving company said Wednesday. Of 360 executives completing the first-quarter survey, 26 percent said their firms plan to relocate more workers this year than last, while 86 percent of companies will spend as much or more on relocation in 2012 than in 2011. After progressively declining over the past two years, 65 percent of firms are offering relocated employees full reimbursement, far more often than lump sum or partial reimbursement, the Atlas survey showed.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
Resource America Inc., of Philadelphia, has agreed to combine one of its asset management units, Apidos Capital Management L.L.C., with CVC Cordatus Group to form CVC Credit Partners, which will have $7.5 billion in loans and other credit-related assets under management, the two companies said Wednesday. For its contribution of Apidos, which had $5.5 billion in assets under management on Sept. 30, Resource America will receive $25 million in cash and a 33 percent ownership interested in CVC Credit partners.
REAL_ESTATE
August 9, 1987 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Leonard thinks small, a philosophy that has made a small fortune for him in real estate. His Haddonfield firm, Roney, Vermaat & Leonard, lacks the advertising budget of the Century 21 franchise offices and the thousands of sales agents that Coldwell Banker Real Estate Group boasts coast-to-coast. He doesn't have it, and he doesn't want it. It is by design that this nine-year-old company has only one office. Daydreams here are not about expansion. Why should they be, asked Leonard, noting so far this year his realty's 20 agents have brought home $21 million in sales.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1991 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
The accounting profession is under siege, its cash flow battered by economic downturn, its image tarnished by the Laventhol & Horwath collapse. The legal profession is in turmoil, with demand for legal services, particularly in real estate and corporate work, on the wane. Amid such turbulence, some professional firms are busting up. Others have gone belly up. But a handful have chosen a third route: counseling. To save their firms, or keep them from getting into trouble in the first place, they are turning to a new kind of consultant, the consulting psychologist.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a nonprofit company like Biosciences Information Service (Biosis), it might seem a bit extravagant to invest almost $500 for a booth at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's two-day Operation Native Talent conference. The 60-year-old Philadelphia firm, which employs about 350, is the world's largest abstracting and indexing service for the life sciences, but one of the smallest companies taking part in the annual jobs' fair. The conference, held yesterday and today at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza hotel, brings together more than 6,000 college seniors and recent graduates with about 90 would-be employers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 12, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Crothall Services Group Inc. in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia Thursday for failing to keep proper employment records. The suit said that Crothall, a nationwide janitorial and facilities management services company based in Wayne, routinely assessed applicants' criminal backgrounds in making hiring decisions. Federal law requires employers to keep records that show whether the use of criminal background checks or any other selection test, ends up causing discrimination in the hiring process.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Filipino and Indonesian temporary workers at ICS Corp., a direct mail and printing company on the edge of Philadelphia's Fishtown neighborhood, finished their regular shifts as machine operators, printers, cutters, and sorters, they clocked out. Then they kept on working - same duties, same place. What happened after that is the basis for a $1.45 million settlement in overtime pay and damages, payable to 166 people, following a U.S. Department of Labor investigation. Neither ICS Corp.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
NEARLY TWO MONTHS after a Ride the Ducks boat struck and crushed his wife at a Center City intersection, a Texas man is suing the company and the city of Philadelphia. Daniel Karnicki, of Beaumont, Texas, filed the lawsuit yesterday, claiming that Liz Karnicki's wrongful death was at the hands of Ride the Ducks. The lawsuit was filed on the fifth anniversary of another Ride the Ducks collision that killed two Hungarian tourists who were on board. Karnicki's attorney, Robert Mongeluzzi, said that the duck boat's blind spots made it nearly impossible for the driver to see Liz Karnicki when she crossed the street, and that the driver was distracted because he also acted as a tour guide.
NEWS
July 3, 2015
D EAR READERS: In May, I printed a letter from a parent who said that his "independent, intelligent, loving" daughters (both in their late 20s) have dated their boyfriends for five years and had recently moved in with them. The man also said that he and his wife approve of the young men. One daughter is planning to have an open house and invited her parents. The writer said that his daughter is upset because he and his wife refuse to attend because cohabitation is against their beliefs.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
President Obama warned Iran's ayatollahs on Tuesday that he was ready to walk away from a nuclear deal if Tehran won't agree to tough measures to prevent cheating. Let's hope he means what he says. Negotiators have already extended the deadline from June 30 to July 7. The administration should push it back further if Tehran won't give inspectors adequate access or clear up questions about previous military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program. "Given past behavior on the part of Iran," said the president, verification can't "be a few inspectors wandering around every once in a while.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
AlliedBarton Security Services, the Conshohocken-based security giant, will be sold to Wendel, a Paris-based private-equity firm, in a $1.67 billion cash and debt deal. AlliedBarton, which began its local history as SpectaGuard, founded by former Flyers president Jay Snider, employs 6,000 locally and 55,000 nationally. It counts 200 of the Fortune 500 as clients, along with 3,000 other landlords and tenants. Wendel owns 11.7 percent of the Malvern-based building-materials maker Saint-Gobain, which includes Certainteed, a more well-known local materials company.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. Nolan, 59, of New Hope, who worked in the family title insurance company his entire adult life, died Sunday, June 21, of liver cancer. The lifelong Bucks County resident, a 1974 graduate of Neshaminy High School, began working at Tohickon Abstract Co. in Holicong soon after graduating from Dartmouth College in 1978. At the time of his death, he was president and co-owner. His brother Patrick called him a "super-hard worker in the family business. " His wife, however, said his family came first.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Air Products & Chemicals Inc., of Allentown, has more than 750 factories in 50 countries. One of its factories, in a town near Lyon, France, was in the global spotlight Friday after an attacker rammed a vehicle into a warehouse on the property, causing an explosion, and leaving behind a severed head on the factory entrance gate. "I am horrified and saddened by the attack on our facility in France. I believe I speak for all of our Air Products family around the world in expressing our deepest sympathies to the family of the victim of this unspeakable act," CEO Seifi Ghasemi said in a statement.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't Google, Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, or Zappos - none of these high-profile new-age companies nabbed the top spot on Fortune Magazine's first-ever list of best workplaces for millennials. Instead, it was a home remodeling company in Chester - Power Home Remodeling Group, a privately held firm with 1,511 employees based in a former power plant on the Delaware River. (Google, by the way, ranked 25th out of 100 for millennials, although the California search engine company has led Fortune's respected Top 100 Workplaces for all workers for the last six years.)
BUSINESS
June 24, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The acquisitive Dallas company that gobbled up Sunoco in 2012 is making a bid to become an even bigger energy behemoth. Energy Transfer Equity L.P. announced Monday that it had proposed an all-stock merger with Tulsa-based Williams Cos. Inc. that it valued at $53.1 billion, combining two of the country's largest pipeline companies. Williams rejected the offer, which priced its stock at a 32 percent premium, as being inadequate. But the company's stock soared Monday, closing almost 26 percent higher, and Williams announced that it had launched a review of its strategic alternatives, including a merger.
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