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NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Wow!" "That's really neat!" "Cool!" Those words were uttered yesterday as a crowd at the New Jersey State Aquarium gazed at a motorized mobile that sent hundreds of fish swimming toward a lighted dome, giving the impression of fish swimming on the ceiling. The mobile, in the rotunda, was just one innovation in a $3.75 million package displayed yesterday when the aquarium opened a new exhibition titled "Ocean Base Atlantic. " Among the features were a 7-foot-tall set of jaws from a prehistoric, 50- ton shark, an interactive computer system called "Ask the Experts," and an underwater station that simulates life on the bottom of the ocean.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Kevin Corbett, of West Philadelphia, takes advantage of clear, cool weather yesterday to fish on the Schuylkill near Boathouse Row. Today is expected to be partly cloudy with a chance of showers.
FOOD
August 30, 2012
Excerpts from Craig LaBan's online chat. Craig LaBan: Good afternoon, my hungry friends, and welcome to the summer's-just-about-done Philly food chat! Summer's done for me, now that I'm back from a great season of travels, the final leg being a loop through New England. We had great meals almost everywhere we went. In Providence, R.I., we had grilled corn pizza and wood-roasted eggplant parmesan at the classic Al Forno, and amazing mac 'n' cheese alongside house-made charcuterie (kimchi sausage)
NEWS
December 19, 1990
In his autobiography, Benjamin Franklin told of how at age 17 he had decided not to become a complete vegetarian after all. This selection was suggested by Harriette Behringer. Being becalmed off Block Island, our people set about catching cod, and hauled up a great many. Hitherto, I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and I considered the taking of every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them . . . could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter.
FOOD
September 11, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Eat up fresh-caught fish fast. They'll taste so much better. That fresh quality and taste begin to deteriorate as soon as the fish leaves the water. The way it is caught and stored also affects the flavor. When caught, fish struggle to escape and use up stored glycogen that otherwise would convert to lactic acid, which acts as a preservative for the flesh. Oily fish, unusually high in polyunsaturated fats, also tend to spoil more quickly. Refrigeration helps preserve the fish, but won't stop the growth of bacteria on and in the fish, which should be gutted and rinsed at once.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Michael Boyd, 22, and Mary Bond, 23, both of North Philadelphia, cast for fish in the Schuylkill on a warm summer's day, with bucket poised to hold their catch should they meet with success.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Goldfish don't forget every time they swim around the bowl. Fish - the smarter ones at least - have been shown to distinguish left from right, to remember mental maps of their surroundings, sometimes for months, use logic, engage in deception, and cooperate while hunting. We humans have grudgingly come to accept the idea that our close relatives the chimpanzees can think. And maybe our best friend the dog. But fish? They're not even warm-blooded. We may tend to underestimate fish as "lower" creatures thanks to the residue of an ancient idea known as the great chain of being - a quasi-religious notion that all living things form a hierarchy from lowest to highest.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lawrence Ceresani said he got the idea from a previous owner who built the half-acre pond in the back yard to raise trout. When Ceresani bought the house on Bridgetown Pike in Northampton Township seven years ago, he decided to switch to a more colorful fish called Koi. Or, as Ceresani describes them, a Japanese "gigantic-looking goldfish. " The Koi started reproducing like crazy. "Before you knew it," Ceresani said, "you could almost walk across the pond on them. " It started Ceresani thinking, and about two years ago, he set up a fish hatchery on his 6.35-acre property and began selling the fish to a couple of wholesalers who supply pet stores.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | by Jim Nolan , Daily News Staff Writer
Koi are to carp what butterflies are to moths. "They're basically the same fish that swim in our rivers," said Donna Howard, of the Quality Koi Co. on North Broad Street. "But koi have much prettier clothes on. " Spectacular suits of metallic gold and platinum. Vivid stripes and spots of red and white and black. The Japanese call them "living jewels. " The goldfish are a distant cousin, but don't expect to win a koi at the church carnival. They are bred like show dogs and fetch similarly high prices - anywhere from $250 to $2,500 on average, with rare one-in-a-million specimens fetching in excess of $10,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Savvy entrepreneurial types would be well-advised to trundle down to the Roxy Screening Rooms this weekend at midnight and set up some fish-bark stands. That's right, bark shaped like fish - straight from the tree, curved like a cod. They'll sell like hotcakes to the giddy crowd exiting Tales From the Gimli Hospital. A magnificently murky, completely off-kilter movie - mostly silent and shot in grainy black-and-white - Tales From the Gimli Hospital is a funny, surreal, grim fairy tale, steeped in a lore of its own making.
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FOOD
August 14, 2015
Fresh fish on the grill is one of summer's simple pleasures: season with salt and pepper, cook, and finish with a touch of lemon. But with just the tiniest extra effort, you can turn that basic fillet into a spectacular dish. Here, two easy steps make it so: add a smear of sun-dried tomato tapenade and wrap it in a leaf of Swiss chard. Chard-Wrapped Cod With Sun-Dried Tomato Tapenade 4 servings   For the tapenade 12 sun-dried tomatoes (not oil-packed; 1.4 ounces total)
NEWS
August 3, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time he started at Drexel University, Maryland native Michael Hsiao had taken a break from fishing. The biology major enjoyed the sport but assumed that Philadelphia's creeks and rivers were polluted and hostile to most species of fish. That changed in 2011, when he stumbled across "Extreme Philly Fishing," a blog for city fishing enthusiasts who are extreme in their love for the sport. The author of the blog is Leo Sheng, a 2014 Temple University grad who makes his living tutoring physics and math students.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
Jack Snyder was having one of those days you don't forget. Freckle-faced Jack and his crew-cut dad, Andy, were deep-sea fishing a few miles off Wildwood, N.J., on the 78-foot party boat Miss Avalon. Nine-year-old Jack had never dropped a line in the ocean before, and the fish were giving him a big welcome: In all, Jack brought about nine of them to the surface (it was hard to keep track after a while), sometimes with his own rod, sometimes with the rod of a neighboring angler who let Jack reel in a hooked fish.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When mating prospects are grim, certain females in Jersey Shore waters appear to have developed a clever strategy: changing sex. That is what Rutgers University scientists think is happening with black sea bass, apparently in response to declining numbers of males. The ability to take a swim on the wild side has been shown previously in lab studies, both in black sea bass and a few other marine species. Now the Rutgers team has shown it happens in the ocean. With the help of Jersey Shore boat captains, the researchers have been tagging, recapturing, and studying hundreds of the fish.
SPORTS
July 3, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Benny Looper, the Phillies' assistant general manager in charge of player personnel, tells an interesting story from his younger days about a solid major-league player he once scouted but could not sign. Danny Doyle, the late Boston Red Sox scout who signed Roger Clemens, was watching the player in question and listening to Looper talk about his scouting prowess. "Son," Doyle told his fellow Oklahoman, "unless you sign 'em, it don't mean nothing. " Looper recounted that story in the midst of a conversation about how his current team has pursued some of the Cuban defectors who have signed huge big-league contracts in recent years.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
VENTNOR, N.J. - Some days on the fishing pier, all you catch is a breeze, some sunburn and bloodworm guts on your pants. No matter how much you emulate the old-timers, copying their baits and mimicking their little twitches with the rod, sometimes you just haul in seaweed while "Harold the cement guy," "Father Frank" and "Kenny the cop" are killing kingfish left and right. That's why they call it "fishing, not catching," one saying goes. If that one doesn't make a flustered fisherman feel better, the regulars and ringers who can't seem to miss a fish will tell you "a day out fishing always beats a day at work" and that's hard to argue against - unless you're Lou Kanter.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Erik Lund will do the dirty work of fishing for folks up and down the Jersey Shore. Inspired by his own experience as a lifelong fisherman, Lund, 33, of Cape May, started On the Fly Mobile Fish Cleaning in 2012, with the help of his wife, Rebeka, and two daughters - Mia, 12, and Isabella, 8. He cleans, guts, and fillets fish for customers at the South Jersey Marina in Cape May, where he usually parks his truck. But he can also go to wherever his fishing clientele desires. Last week, Lund discussed his unique business while cutting up a thrasher for a hungry customer.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When scientists announced their discovery of a prehistoric fishlike creature with muscled fins that looked a bit like legs, the media trumpeted it as a "missing link. " Cartoonists drew images of fish marching onto land. One person who was a bit uneasy amid all the acclaim in 2006 was the codiscoverer of the fossil, Edward B. "Ted" Daeschler of Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences. After years of additional study, however, and multiple return visits to the site of the discovery in the Canadian Arctic, Daeschler has edged closer to all the hype.
NEWS
May 8, 2015
RICH LANDAU and Kate Jacoby, owners and executive chefs of Vedge, provided this recipe for Gene Baur's new book, Living the Farm Sanctuary Life: The Ultimate Guide to Eating Mindfully, Living Longer, and Feeling Better Every Day. Baur writes, "I love this robust 'catch-of-the-day' tomato soup, because here the catch isn't fish, it's wild mushrooms, peas, leeks and fennel. Served with a slice of toasted sourdough bread, this is a compassionate version of a San Francisco classic.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hold a dead octopus up to a room full of elementary school students and the reaction is almost certainly a resounding "eww. " Trying to convince the students that the slimy, tentacled creature is, in fact, a healthy source of protein is no easy chore after moans of disgust, but this was the task at hand Monday at Springville Elementary School in Mount Laurel. Students from the K-4 school gathered in Springville's cafeteria to watch as Ian Knox, executive chef at Blair House in Washington, and representatives from Samuels & Son Seafood Co., a national wholesale company founded in Philadelphia, and Whole Foods stressed the importance of healthy eating with cooking demonstrations and prizes.
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