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NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Wow!" "That's really neat!" "Cool!" Those words were uttered yesterday as a crowd at the New Jersey State Aquarium gazed at a motorized mobile that sent hundreds of fish swimming toward a lighted dome, giving the impression of fish swimming on the ceiling. The mobile, in the rotunda, was just one innovation in a $3.75 million package displayed yesterday when the aquarium opened a new exhibition titled "Ocean Base Atlantic. " Among the features were a 7-foot-tall set of jaws from a prehistoric, 50- ton shark, an interactive computer system called "Ask the Experts," and an underwater station that simulates life on the bottom of the ocean.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Kevin Corbett, of West Philadelphia, takes advantage of clear, cool weather yesterday to fish on the Schuylkill near Boathouse Row. Today is expected to be partly cloudy with a chance of showers.
FOOD
August 30, 2012
Excerpts from Craig LaBan's online chat. Craig LaBan: Good afternoon, my hungry friends, and welcome to the summer's-just-about-done Philly food chat! Summer's done for me, now that I'm back from a great season of travels, the final leg being a loop through New England. We had great meals almost everywhere we went. In Providence, R.I., we had grilled corn pizza and wood-roasted eggplant parmesan at the classic Al Forno, and amazing mac 'n' cheese alongside house-made charcuterie (kimchi sausage)
NEWS
December 19, 1990
In his autobiography, Benjamin Franklin told of how at age 17 he had decided not to become a complete vegetarian after all. This selection was suggested by Harriette Behringer. Being becalmed off Block Island, our people set about catching cod, and hauled up a great many. Hitherto, I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and I considered the taking of every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them . . . could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter.
FOOD
September 11, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Eat up fresh-caught fish fast. They'll taste so much better. That fresh quality and taste begin to deteriorate as soon as the fish leaves the water. The way it is caught and stored also affects the flavor. When caught, fish struggle to escape and use up stored glycogen that otherwise would convert to lactic acid, which acts as a preservative for the flesh. Oily fish, unusually high in polyunsaturated fats, also tend to spoil more quickly. Refrigeration helps preserve the fish, but won't stop the growth of bacteria on and in the fish, which should be gutted and rinsed at once.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Michael Boyd, 22, and Mary Bond, 23, both of North Philadelphia, cast for fish in the Schuylkill on a warm summer's day, with bucket poised to hold their catch should they meet with success.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Goldfish don't forget every time they swim around the bowl. Fish - the smarter ones at least - have been shown to distinguish left from right, to remember mental maps of their surroundings, sometimes for months, use logic, engage in deception, and cooperate while hunting. We humans have grudgingly come to accept the idea that our close relatives the chimpanzees can think. And maybe our best friend the dog. But fish? They're not even warm-blooded. We may tend to underestimate fish as "lower" creatures thanks to the residue of an ancient idea known as the great chain of being - a quasi-religious notion that all living things form a hierarchy from lowest to highest.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lawrence Ceresani said he got the idea from a previous owner who built the half-acre pond in the back yard to raise trout. When Ceresani bought the house on Bridgetown Pike in Northampton Township seven years ago, he decided to switch to a more colorful fish called Koi. Or, as Ceresani describes them, a Japanese "gigantic-looking goldfish. " The Koi started reproducing like crazy. "Before you knew it," Ceresani said, "you could almost walk across the pond on them. " It started Ceresani thinking, and about two years ago, he set up a fish hatchery on his 6.35-acre property and began selling the fish to a couple of wholesalers who supply pet stores.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | by Jim Nolan , Daily News Staff Writer
Koi are to carp what butterflies are to moths. "They're basically the same fish that swim in our rivers," said Donna Howard, of the Quality Koi Co. on North Broad Street. "But koi have much prettier clothes on. " Spectacular suits of metallic gold and platinum. Vivid stripes and spots of red and white and black. The Japanese call them "living jewels. " The goldfish are a distant cousin, but don't expect to win a koi at the church carnival. They are bred like show dogs and fetch similarly high prices - anywhere from $250 to $2,500 on average, with rare one-in-a-million specimens fetching in excess of $10,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Savvy entrepreneurial types would be well-advised to trundle down to the Roxy Screening Rooms this weekend at midnight and set up some fish-bark stands. That's right, bark shaped like fish - straight from the tree, curved like a cod. They'll sell like hotcakes to the giddy crowd exiting Tales From the Gimli Hospital. A magnificently murky, completely off-kilter movie - mostly silent and shot in grainy black-and-white - Tales From the Gimli Hospital is a funny, surreal, grim fairy tale, steeped in a lore of its own making.
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NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A government researcher who has studied intersex fish in the Potomac River now has found them in three Pennsylvania river basins, including the Delaware. The fish - males that develop immature eggs and other signs of feminization - are considered symptomatic of estrogenic chemicals in the water. Their discovery in the state indicates that effects of hormones and hormone-like compounds are more widespread than thought. The mutant fish could bespeak a deeper crisis, said Vicki Blazer, a U.S. Geological Survey fish biologist who conducted the Pennsylvania study.
FOOD
July 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Greenberg's commitment to local seafood runs deep - so deep that the Manhattan-based writer once slurped down an oyster he'd plucked from the muck of New York Harbor, eliciting a gasp from a city official standing nearby. But the author of the newly released American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood (Penguin) is aware there's a tidal wave of forces working against him. Today, 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, even as a third of the domestic catch is shipped overseas.
FOOD
May 23, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The first one to burst through the door for after-school cooking class at Lawton Elementary - as usual - is Christian McKinney, this week sporting a fresh mohawkish buzz-cut. He wastes no time: he glances at the recipe, sizes up the ingredients on the stainless steel prep table, and starts right in, peeling, then chopping the garlic. If I didn't insist that he save some jobs for the others, he might get through most of the work before they even arrive. "Nick is so excited for the fish curry today," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* SUSAN BOYLE: HER SECRET STRUGGLE. 10 tonight, Ovation. * YOUR INNER FISH. 10 tonight, WHYY12.   LABELS CAN BE limiting, but they can also be freeing. It's worked that way, at least, for Susan Boyle, the Scottish singer whose appearance on "Britain's Got Talent" - five years ago this week - made her an international sensation via YouTube. Her attempt to overcome crippling stage fright to add live performances to a successful recording career is the subject of "Susan Boyle: Her Secret Struggle," a documentary making its U.S. premiere on Ovation tonight.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was no official signal to open trout-fishing season Saturday morning in Southeastern Pennsylvania - no starting gunshot or horn. But thousands of anglers across the region knew that 8 a.m. meant they could once again break out their tackle boxes and wet a line. So for dozens of fishers standing nearly shoulder-to-shoulder along the West Branch of Brandywine Creek near Coatesville - many had arrived before dawn to claim a spot on the banks - one fisher's first cast was as good a signal as any: lines soon after dunked into the creek, and the brook was open for business.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Make a great catch Saturday at Linvilla Orchards' Family Fun Fishing Derby. Orchard Lake will be supplied with 1,000 trout, and no fishing license is required to participate. Experienced or novice anglers can test their skills. Trophies will be awarded to kids and adults who make the first catch in their age group. Those who succeed can take home the first fish they catch; additional catches can be purchased for $4.99 per pound. Guests also can catch and release as long as the fish are unharmed.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
DRINK UP, Jersey, it's your 350th birthday. And Flying Fish - the Garden State's largest craft brewery - has brewed a fitting pint for the occasion: NJ350 Anniversary Ale . It's the Camden County brewery's version of a traditional English stock ale (this birthday marks New Jersey's establishment as a British colony, remember), with a brash bite of modern-day American sedition. "The idea was to pay homage to 350 years of history," Flying Fish brewery manager Barry Holsten told me when I stopped by on brew day earlier this month, "so we looked backward and forward.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert M. Weintraub, 76, of Gwynedd Valley, a tropical-fish expert whose marketing ability made it fun to shop for the colorful creatures at his aquarium supercenter, died of pneumonia Monday, March 3, at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Mr. Weintraub and his brother, Paul, started out by working at Martin's Aquarium, the store their parents founded in Jenkintown. But Mr. Weintraub's greatest success came as the designer and co-owner of Captain Nemo's Aquarium in East Norriton Township.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the power went out last week at George Treisner's Kennett Square pet shop, and nearly a thousand fish inside came face to face with a frigid demise in their typically tropical tanks, the owner turned to an unlikely appliance for help. A propane fish fryer. In a pot of water warmed above the flame, Trainer heated up dozens of water bottles before submerging them in the tanks of striped Gouramis, neon Tetras, and glistening guppies. For eight hours, until the lights at Paws & Claws Pet Store came back on at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Treisner kept up the rotation, swapping out bottles when they turned lukewarm.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Elvis is so passionate about fishing that he hopes to become a professional fisherman when he grows up. He would love to go deep-sea fishing. For this 15-year-old, fishing is a way to relax and cope, as well as to have fun. One of his favorite television shows is River Monsters . Someday, he says, he might also like to open a reptile store. Elvis enjoys being involved in activities in his community, including the basketball and baseball programs. He joined his local Boy Scout team in the fall and looks forward to its monthly camping trip.
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