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NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Wow!" "That's really neat!" "Cool!" Those words were uttered yesterday as a crowd at the New Jersey State Aquarium gazed at a motorized mobile that sent hundreds of fish swimming toward a lighted dome, giving the impression of fish swimming on the ceiling. The mobile, in the rotunda, was just one innovation in a $3.75 million package displayed yesterday when the aquarium opened a new exhibition titled "Ocean Base Atlantic. " Among the features were a 7-foot-tall set of jaws from a prehistoric, 50- ton shark, an interactive computer system called "Ask the Experts," and an underwater station that simulates life on the bottom of the ocean.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Kevin Corbett, of West Philadelphia, takes advantage of clear, cool weather yesterday to fish on the Schuylkill near Boathouse Row. Today is expected to be partly cloudy with a chance of showers.
FOOD
August 30, 2012
Excerpts from Craig LaBan's online chat. Craig LaBan: Good afternoon, my hungry friends, and welcome to the summer's-just-about-done Philly food chat! Summer's done for me, now that I'm back from a great season of travels, the final leg being a loop through New England. We had great meals almost everywhere we went. In Providence, R.I., we had grilled corn pizza and wood-roasted eggplant parmesan at the classic Al Forno, and amazing mac 'n' cheese alongside house-made charcuterie (kimchi sausage)
NEWS
December 19, 1990
In his autobiography, Benjamin Franklin told of how at age 17 he had decided not to become a complete vegetarian after all. This selection was suggested by Harriette Behringer. Being becalmed off Block Island, our people set about catching cod, and hauled up a great many. Hitherto, I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and I considered the taking of every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them . . . could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter.
FOOD
September 11, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Eat up fresh-caught fish fast. They'll taste so much better. That fresh quality and taste begin to deteriorate as soon as the fish leaves the water. The way it is caught and stored also affects the flavor. When caught, fish struggle to escape and use up stored glycogen that otherwise would convert to lactic acid, which acts as a preservative for the flesh. Oily fish, unusually high in polyunsaturated fats, also tend to spoil more quickly. Refrigeration helps preserve the fish, but won't stop the growth of bacteria on and in the fish, which should be gutted and rinsed at once.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Michael Boyd, 22, and Mary Bond, 23, both of North Philadelphia, cast for fish in the Schuylkill on a warm summer's day, with bucket poised to hold their catch should they meet with success.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Goldfish don't forget every time they swim around the bowl. Fish - the smarter ones at least - have been shown to distinguish left from right, to remember mental maps of their surroundings, sometimes for months, use logic, engage in deception, and cooperate while hunting. We humans have grudgingly come to accept the idea that our close relatives the chimpanzees can think. And maybe our best friend the dog. But fish? They're not even warm-blooded. We may tend to underestimate fish as "lower" creatures thanks to the residue of an ancient idea known as the great chain of being - a quasi-religious notion that all living things form a hierarchy from lowest to highest.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lawrence Ceresani said he got the idea from a previous owner who built the half-acre pond in the back yard to raise trout. When Ceresani bought the house on Bridgetown Pike in Northampton Township seven years ago, he decided to switch to a more colorful fish called Koi. Or, as Ceresani describes them, a Japanese "gigantic-looking goldfish. " The Koi started reproducing like crazy. "Before you knew it," Ceresani said, "you could almost walk across the pond on them. " It started Ceresani thinking, and about two years ago, he set up a fish hatchery on his 6.35-acre property and began selling the fish to a couple of wholesalers who supply pet stores.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | by Jim Nolan , Daily News Staff Writer
Koi are to carp what butterflies are to moths. "They're basically the same fish that swim in our rivers," said Donna Howard, of the Quality Koi Co. on North Broad Street. "But koi have much prettier clothes on. " Spectacular suits of metallic gold and platinum. Vivid stripes and spots of red and white and black. The Japanese call them "living jewels. " The goldfish are a distant cousin, but don't expect to win a koi at the church carnival. They are bred like show dogs and fetch similarly high prices - anywhere from $250 to $2,500 on average, with rare one-in-a-million specimens fetching in excess of $10,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Savvy entrepreneurial types would be well-advised to trundle down to the Roxy Screening Rooms this weekend at midnight and set up some fish-bark stands. That's right, bark shaped like fish - straight from the tree, curved like a cod. They'll sell like hotcakes to the giddy crowd exiting Tales From the Gimli Hospital. A magnificently murky, completely off-kilter movie - mostly silent and shot in grainy black-and-white - Tales From the Gimli Hospital is a funny, surreal, grim fairy tale, steeped in a lore of its own making.
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FOOD
August 11, 2016
Makes 4 servings 4 7-ounce Chilean sea bass fillets Salt and pepper Olive oil 1 pound onions, halved and thinly sliced 1 green pepper, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup diced carrot 1 Idaho potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks 28-ounce can chopped tomatoes with juice 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1/2 cup fish stock or clam juice 1/2 teaspoon sugar 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon ...
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
To sell more gear, Cabela's simulates the Great Outdoors. Live game fish school in glass-walled aquariums, and stuffed megafauna herd overhead at the retailer's hangar-sized stores on the edge of whitetail-deer country in Hamburg, Pa., or at the heart of tax-free-shopping territory in Newark, Del. So what brings Cabela's to Chester, the shrunken industrial city at the foot of the Commodore Barry Bridge? "Your waterway there, the Delaware River, is super-good for the sport of catfishing," says Darrell Van Vactor , operations manager at Kentucky-based King Kat USA . "It's a great location, central for a lot of people," on a stretch of the Delaware that otherwise has limited public access, Eric Williams , a Cabela's marketing manager, told me. King Kat runs catfish tournaments sponsored and staffed by Cabela's.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
Philly's own  Amber Rose and ex Wiz Khalifa can officially move on - the couple has reached a divorce settlement. And where did they celebrate? A strip club. Make it rain away the pain. TMZ.com reported that in the settlement, Amber gets $1 million thanks to the couple's prenup (of which Wiz still owes her $644,000). She also gets $14,800 a month in child support for their 3-year-old son, Sebastian "Bash" Taylor Thomaz . That's enough money for Tattle to call Amber "mommy.
NEWS
May 31, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Students at Interboro High School in Prospect Park have been known to turn to tech-ed teachers Joe Fisher and Tom Speer with one of life's elemental questions: "Where do cheeseburgers come from?" In their densely populated Delaware County suburb, where fast food is the cash crop that sprouts from long-ago farms, the answer is not immediately obvious. But what might befuddle some modern youth served to inspire Speer and Fisher. Last fall, they embarked on a splashy project to teach students about food production and sustainability.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, STAFF WRITER
Two students from the Philadelphia region advanced to the final rounds Thursday in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, but fell short of capturing the best speller title. Shruthika Padhy, of Cherry Hill, was eliminated when she incorrectly spelled the word "tyee," (a type of fish). Padhy, 10, is a fifth grader at Bret Harte Elementary School in Cherry Hill, N.J. She was sponsored by the school. She was interviewed by Scripps after her elimination and asked what she learned from the experience.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Three degrees in three years. Two commencements within a month — interrupted by starting an Ivy League master's degree. It took Kevin P. Wright, 44, a while to figure out how to pursue higher education, but when he got started, he really went after it. Wright, who received his GED in 2013, is this year's valedictorian at Rowan College at Burlington County. After delivering his commencement speech there Saturday, he will receive his bachelor's diploma from Thomas Jefferson University in June.
FOOD
April 8, 2016
David Suro-Piñera has seen regulars at Tequila's who, for 30 years, have ordered the same thing each time they come to his elegant Locust Street restaurant. That explains why the tortilla soup, mole poblano, and cochinita pibil are still among the authentic classics that anchor the menu. But if you graze some of chef Claudio Soto's creative specials, you'll discover Tequila's kitchen has been evolving, too, keeping pace with the contemporary ideas that have appeared in some of Philly's more recent Nuevo Mex entrees.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
In the black-and-white film, father and son hawk fish on a Ninth Street that is no more. Thomas Anastasi, father, dreamer, lover, gambler. A cigarette dangling from his lips, he's tired of the long days hauling, gutting, and selling fish. He's thinking of buying that brand-new 1977 Cadillac, a $14,000 car, how he's earned it, how all his life he had nothing. He's thinking of traveling the world. Salvatore Anastasi. Blond, shaggy-haired, easygoing 18-year-old Salvy. His thoughts are on pretty Carol, of their wedding just days away, of taking over the family business and making his way in the world.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
"Nature is the artist," says Matthew McCann. "All I do is select. " The 42-year-old koi farm manager and breeder is being unduly modest. McCann has decades of experience with the blazingly colorful, boldly patterned mutant carp prized by landscape designers, hobbyists, and the serious enthusiasts who show competitively around the world. "I like that a lot," he says, singling out a two-year-old at Quality Koi Co. Inc.'s Nisei Koi Farm in Carneys Point, Salem County. I see an energetic bunch of pretty fish splashing around in and attempting to leap out of a blue container that's rather like a kiddie pool.
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