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NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Wow!" "That's really neat!" "Cool!" Those words were uttered yesterday as a crowd at the New Jersey State Aquarium gazed at a motorized mobile that sent hundreds of fish swimming toward a lighted dome, giving the impression of fish swimming on the ceiling. The mobile, in the rotunda, was just one innovation in a $3.75 million package displayed yesterday when the aquarium opened a new exhibition titled "Ocean Base Atlantic. " Among the features were a 7-foot-tall set of jaws from a prehistoric, 50- ton shark, an interactive computer system called "Ask the Experts," and an underwater station that simulates life on the bottom of the ocean.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Kevin Corbett, of West Philadelphia, takes advantage of clear, cool weather yesterday to fish on the Schuylkill near Boathouse Row. Today is expected to be partly cloudy with a chance of showers.
FOOD
August 30, 2012
Excerpts from Craig LaBan's online chat. Craig LaBan: Good afternoon, my hungry friends, and welcome to the summer's-just-about-done Philly food chat! Summer's done for me, now that I'm back from a great season of travels, the final leg being a loop through New England. We had great meals almost everywhere we went. In Providence, R.I., we had grilled corn pizza and wood-roasted eggplant parmesan at the classic Al Forno, and amazing mac 'n' cheese alongside house-made charcuterie (kimchi sausage)
NEWS
December 19, 1990
In his autobiography, Benjamin Franklin told of how at age 17 he had decided not to become a complete vegetarian after all. This selection was suggested by Harriette Behringer. Being becalmed off Block Island, our people set about catching cod, and hauled up a great many. Hitherto, I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and I considered the taking of every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them . . . could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter.
FOOD
September 11, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Eat up fresh-caught fish fast. They'll taste so much better. That fresh quality and taste begin to deteriorate as soon as the fish leaves the water. The way it is caught and stored also affects the flavor. When caught, fish struggle to escape and use up stored glycogen that otherwise would convert to lactic acid, which acts as a preservative for the flesh. Oily fish, unusually high in polyunsaturated fats, also tend to spoil more quickly. Refrigeration helps preserve the fish, but won't stop the growth of bacteria on and in the fish, which should be gutted and rinsed at once.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Michael Boyd, 22, and Mary Bond, 23, both of North Philadelphia, cast for fish in the Schuylkill on a warm summer's day, with bucket poised to hold their catch should they meet with success.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Goldfish don't forget every time they swim around the bowl. Fish - the smarter ones at least - have been shown to distinguish left from right, to remember mental maps of their surroundings, sometimes for months, use logic, engage in deception, and cooperate while hunting. We humans have grudgingly come to accept the idea that our close relatives the chimpanzees can think. And maybe our best friend the dog. But fish? They're not even warm-blooded. We may tend to underestimate fish as "lower" creatures thanks to the residue of an ancient idea known as the great chain of being - a quasi-religious notion that all living things form a hierarchy from lowest to highest.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lawrence Ceresani said he got the idea from a previous owner who built the half-acre pond in the back yard to raise trout. When Ceresani bought the house on Bridgetown Pike in Northampton Township seven years ago, he decided to switch to a more colorful fish called Koi. Or, as Ceresani describes them, a Japanese "gigantic-looking goldfish. " The Koi started reproducing like crazy. "Before you knew it," Ceresani said, "you could almost walk across the pond on them. " It started Ceresani thinking, and about two years ago, he set up a fish hatchery on his 6.35-acre property and began selling the fish to a couple of wholesalers who supply pet stores.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | by Jim Nolan , Daily News Staff Writer
Koi are to carp what butterflies are to moths. "They're basically the same fish that swim in our rivers," said Donna Howard, of the Quality Koi Co. on North Broad Street. "But koi have much prettier clothes on. " Spectacular suits of metallic gold and platinum. Vivid stripes and spots of red and white and black. The Japanese call them "living jewels. " The goldfish are a distant cousin, but don't expect to win a koi at the church carnival. They are bred like show dogs and fetch similarly high prices - anywhere from $250 to $2,500 on average, with rare one-in-a-million specimens fetching in excess of $10,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Savvy entrepreneurial types would be well-advised to trundle down to the Roxy Screening Rooms this weekend at midnight and set up some fish-bark stands. That's right, bark shaped like fish - straight from the tree, curved like a cod. They'll sell like hotcakes to the giddy crowd exiting Tales From the Gimli Hospital. A magnificently murky, completely off-kilter movie - mostly silent and shot in grainy black-and-white - Tales From the Gimli Hospital is a funny, surreal, grim fairy tale, steeped in a lore of its own making.
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FOOD
February 27, 2015 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Eating fish on Fridays is a longstanding tradition in Catholic households worldwide dating back to the first century of the modern era. Why abstain from meat? Why on Friday? Why during Lent? Meat once was for celebrations and feasting. Early Christians abstained from eating meat on Friday as a kind of sacrifice and reminder that acknowledged the death of Jesus on the cross on Good Friday. This still holds true today in the Catholic Church, but only on Ash Wednesday, and Fridays during Lent.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
HAVE YOU heard? Science shows that, contrary to popular thinking, fish is not a vegetable. Many so-called vegetarians harbor that fluid dietary ethic. I include my own 15 years as a so-called vegetarian, when I celebrated the occasional birthday or holiday with shrimp or New England clam chowder because, come on, "It's just seafood!" But serious science has established a couple of other facts. One is that ocean drift nets grab a huge amount of "bycatch" - nontargeted animals that die just the same.
TRAVEL
January 26, 2015 | By Frank Hollick, For The Inquirer
"Let's head back to Montana next summer," said my fly-fishing buddy Tom. We had spent a week the previous summer on the beautiful Madison River, and in nearby Yellowstone Park in Wyoming, with our good friend Jim. While not catching a ton of fish, we had a fly fisherman's dream week. "I'm in. Let me talk to Jim," I responded, with visions of 20-inch trout rising to my dry fly filling my head. Jim said yes immediately, and to make the idea more palatable on the home front, we decided to ask our wives to go along.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Learn about winter's effects on Schuylkill aquatic life at the Fairmount Water Works during this week's Science Saturdays program, "Fish: Playing it Cool in Winter. " From 2 to 4 p.m., you'll learn about the lifestyles of aquatic cold-blooded species and how they survive in the Schuylkill during the cold months. Also find out the physical differences between cold and hot water, and how they affect water creatures. Plus, you can make a fish to take home. Science Saturdays, 2 to 4 p.m. at Water Works Interpretive Center, 640 Waterworks Dr. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
"In our family, there was no clear line between religion and fly fishing. " - "A River Runs Through It," Norman Maclean In our family, fishing has been not so much a religion as the legacy of generations - a dormant but lingering theme passed down my wife's side through heirlooms, taxidermy, and lore. When my mother-in-law was crowned Miss Penn State in 1951, the pivotal question Barbara Klopp answered from the judges, she proudly remembered, had to do with fishing.
SPORTS
October 23, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Eagles reunited on Tuesday at the NovaCare Complex after a week away from work. During the bye week, they scattered from one end of the country to the other. They went back home to visit family and friends. They went hunting and fishing. They returned to their high schools or colleges to see how things were going. They sat their aching bodies down and put their feet up. They did a lot, and they did nothing. The coaches mostly scattered, too, but Chip Kelly stayed around to evaluate what has happened so far this season and to get a jump on planning for Sunday's game against the Arizona Cardinals.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania professor who studies psychopaths has found hope for improving human behavior in a surprising place: fish oil. A new study led by Adrian Raine, a psychologist in Penn's criminology department, found giving children a fruit drink mixed with omega-3 fatty acids - a key ingredient in fish oil - improved their behavior. Strangely, the behavior of parents also improved, even though they weren't taking the supplements. More on that later. Raine's ultimate goal is ambitious: to reduce crime.
NEWS
October 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK CRAWLEY was popular in his Southwest Philadelphia neighborhood for a couple of reasons. Mostly, he was a friendly, helpful guy who would sit outside his home on Angora Terrace near 58th Street and greet passing neighbors who would often stop and chat. They knew that Frank was not only a pleasure to be with, but that he would be there for them if they ever needed any kind of help. He was a very neighborly neighbor. And then there were the fish. Frank and some of his buddies seemed to have a natural talent for bringing in the fish, whether from the Chesapeake Bay or the Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A government researcher who has studied intersex fish in the Potomac River now has found them in three Pennsylvania river basins, including the Delaware. The fish - males that develop immature eggs and other signs of feminization - are considered symptomatic of estrogenic chemicals in the water. Their discovery in the state indicates that effects of hormones and hormone-like compounds are more widespread than thought. The mutant fish could bespeak a deeper crisis, said Vicki Blazer, a U.S. Geological Survey fish biologist who conducted the Pennsylvania study.
FOOD
July 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Greenberg's commitment to local seafood runs deep - so deep that the Manhattan-based writer once slurped down an oyster he'd plucked from the muck of New York Harbor, eliciting a gasp from a city official standing nearby. But the author of the newly released American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood (Penguin) is aware there's a tidal wave of forces working against him. Today, 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, even as a third of the domestic catch is shipped overseas.
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