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Fish And Chips

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FOOD
September 9, 2010
There's been a revolving door of eateries in the Kings Highway storefront now occupied by the British Chip Shop in quaint downtown Haddonfield. But I'm hoping the timeless appeal of great fried fish and crispy chips - seemingly common but so rarely done this well - gives this genuine ode to English comforts a fighting chance. Co-owned by Ed Strojan and his step-father, Gary Coleman, who also has the English Gardener gift shop across the street, virtually everything here is made with an eye to authenticity, from the shortcakey scones with imported clotted cream to pastry-wrapped banger sausages, sides of mushy peas, Madras curry sauce, and, especially, those fish and chips.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If Jonathan McDonald got a little too big for his britches at a place called Snackbar with those escargot skewers, and crispy mackerel with fennel and apple gelee and some sort of powder derived from the dehydration of olive oil, he would like to make amends. Kick things down a notch. He is installed in the kitchen now at a gastropub four blocks south of that once-effete boite, and at this gig - called Pub & Kitchen ("P&K" to the locals) - it's an entirely different story. He is 30 now, with a baby on board, and he's got his feet more humbly planted: "It's the antithesis" of his last stop, he says - and, frankly, of his other finer-dining stops - Lacroix, West Philadelphia's Marigold Kitchen, and Salt, the brief forerunner of Snackbar, each of which honed his cutting-edge skills and won him no small number of groupies: "Johnny Mac," they call him. But here at noisy P&K, in the space once occupied by Chaucer's at 20th and Lombard, he says, the food is not about him, not about "the celebrity chef thing.
FOOD
May 20, 1990 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Lost is the name of the gastronome who first paired batter-fried fish with french-fried potatoes, packed them helter-skelter in a cone rolled from the morning newspaper, and doused them with malted vinegar. Arguments rage among food historians as to whether it was in 1864 or 1874 or whether it happened in Lancashire, Dundee or London. But to anyone who has ever dined on fish and chips, downing each crisp morsel while standing in the midst of the hubbub of a busy London street, such genealogical ponderings are superfluous.
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
WHITE BUFFALO IS GETTING A DARK COAT A rare white buffalo calf that has attracted thousands of visitors is beginning to grow a permanent, darker coat, especially around her face, neck and legs. American Indians, however, still regard the calf as a sacred messenger symbolizing impending unity and prosperity, said the calf's owner, David Heider. Since the calf named Miracle was born Aug. 20, more than 20,000 people have visited David and Valerie Heider's farm in Wisconsin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Welcome home your little ghosts and goblins with this tasty Halloween sandwich. The folks at London Grill on Fairmount Avenue altered their recipe for their famous fish and chips - skipping the beer in the batter and adding festively ghoulish touches - to create a kid-friendly fish-witch, served on toasted white bread with a side of bloody tartar sauce. After all, you can't expect trick-or-treaters to live on candy alone. THE HALLOWEEN FISH-WITCH SANDWICH For the batter: 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons salt 2 eggs 1/2 cup club soda 1/2 cup water Mix flour and salt in bowl.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Staff Writer
The word "pub" tends to be used a little loosely in the Delaware Valley. Remember the Pub Tiki? A good idea for a Singapore Sling but hardly the place to go for a pint of bitters. Then there is the venerable Pub off of the Airport Circle in Pennsauken, as cozy as the Astrodome. Pub fits the Dickens Inn, overlooking Head House Square, like Mr. Micawber's well-worn shoes. The wooded oval bar looks as if it has been there since Charles Dickens visited Philadelphia over a century ago, and that's no accident.
NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Had you told me a few months ago that I'd be raving about fish and chips and warm pints of bitter, I would have said you were a bloody lunatic. Then again, a few a months ago the Dandelion was still just an odd name for the latest Stephen Starr construction site - a convenient weed metaphor for our irrepressible gardener of concept dining, then hard at work on seedling number 22 at 18th and Sansom Streets. (By April 1, numbers 23 and 24 will have poked their heads through the soils of Florida's South Beach and Washington Square, respectively.)
FOOD
October 16, 2002 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
Fish and chips combines fish fried English-style with the most beloved of all potato dishes. It's a classic becoming as popular in the U.S. as in the U.K. Good, crisp fish and chips is within the reach of any home cook willing to follow the basic rules for safe, successful deep-frying. Choose an oil that can withstand high temperatures without smoking, such as safflower, peanut, grapeseed or soybean oil. If the oil isn't overheated, you can reuse it once or twice after straining it and storing it in a cool place.
NEWS
February 23, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Every neighborhood in America, it seems, has an eatery like Brittingham's Irish Pub: cozy, noisy, crowded, and crammed with memorabilia. Two things - one, if you see Irish food and Irish music as part of the same world order - set Brittingham's apart. You can get great-tasting fish and chips here, but also such chophouse standards as juicy burgers topped with bacon and Thousand Island dressing. The setting is somewhat old-hat, too, beginning with - pardon the pun - the hat-check girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
I don't like beer, and I usually don't care for pub grub. Not that I like to eat fancy all the time; I don't. It's just that I'm never in the mood for the tough roast beef sandwiches and greasy fried fish squares that some bars foist off on their customers. Jim Koch, who devised the menu for the Samuel Adams Brew House on Sansom Street, apparently shares my sentiments. His idea of beer food is fresh grilled sausages, hot chili with big chunks of beef, smoky red beans and rice, barbecued brisket, burgers covered with English cheddar and a fish and chips basket that would pass muster in London.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Poets and playwrights have glorified the exploits of seafaring men since Homer's Odyssey . The Wilma Theater presents a more personal, though no less inspiring, look at this tradition in its riveting North American premiere of Richard Bean's Under the Whaleback . Bean's episodic play portrays the lives of North Sea fishermen across three generations, showing a patrilineage of hardscrabble boys who live long enough to sire sons before expiring...
NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Had you told me a few months ago that I'd be raving about fish and chips and warm pints of bitter, I would have said you were a bloody lunatic. Then again, a few a months ago the Dandelion was still just an odd name for the latest Stephen Starr construction site - a convenient weed metaphor for our irrepressible gardener of concept dining, then hard at work on seedling number 22 at 18th and Sansom Streets. (By April 1, numbers 23 and 24 will have poked their heads through the soils of Florida's South Beach and Washington Square, respectively.)
FOOD
September 9, 2010
There's been a revolving door of eateries in the Kings Highway storefront now occupied by the British Chip Shop in quaint downtown Haddonfield. But I'm hoping the timeless appeal of great fried fish and crispy chips - seemingly common but so rarely done this well - gives this genuine ode to English comforts a fighting chance. Co-owned by Ed Strojan and his step-father, Gary Coleman, who also has the English Gardener gift shop across the street, virtually everything here is made with an eye to authenticity, from the shortcakey scones with imported clotted cream to pastry-wrapped banger sausages, sides of mushy peas, Madras curry sauce, and, especially, those fish and chips.
SPORTS
August 12, 2010 | By KERITH GABRIEL, gabrielk@phillynews.com
Peanut butter and jelly. Fish and chips. Cheese and pretty much anything. The point? These ingredients complement each other to near perfection, just like Union forwards Sebastien Le Toux and Danny Mwanga. It was a reunion of sorts last night for Le Toux and the rookie Mwanga, who didn't seem to be feeling the effects of an ankle injury that kept him out of action for the last three matches. Against defending Major League Soccer champion Real Salt Lake and without forward Alejandro Moreno - not in the lineup because of an international callup for his native Venezuela in a match against Panama - the Union emerged with a 1-1 tie, fueled by an early Mwanga goal, in the eighth minute.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2009 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
It has a fairy tale aspect to it . . . a waitress meets a chef at the Old City restaurant where they work. They fall in love, get married, buy a restaurant in Chestnut Hill and become pregnant. Vanessa and Rob Mullen have been living this fairy tale since they took over Campbell's Place last November. But the restaurant was already associated with a beloved couple, Mary and the late Jim Campbell. So how do you make this story - and restaurant - your own? "It's definitely a fine line," Vanessa Mullen aknowledged.
FOOD
June 11, 2009 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Ask developer Bart Blatstein when he'll stop construction in Northern Liberties, and he replies: "Never. " His latest is the Piazza at Schmidts, a collection of apartments and retail along Second Street south of the old Schmidt's brewery. It's just east of Liberties Walk, his first major retail-residential project in the neighborhood. Last month, the Piazza saw the opening of three restaurants, and in three weeks, there will be a fourth. Free parking is just north of the Piazza in a dirt lot at Second Street and Germantown Avenue, where the brewery once sat. Blatstein plans to develop a supermarket there.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If Jonathan McDonald got a little too big for his britches at a place called Snackbar with those escargot skewers, and crispy mackerel with fennel and apple gelee and some sort of powder derived from the dehydration of olive oil, he would like to make amends. Kick things down a notch. He is installed in the kitchen now at a gastropub four blocks south of that once-effete boite, and at this gig - called Pub & Kitchen ("P&K" to the locals) - it's an entirely different story. He is 30 now, with a baby on board, and he's got his feet more humbly planted: "It's the antithesis" of his last stop, he says - and, frankly, of his other finer-dining stops - Lacroix, West Philadelphia's Marigold Kitchen, and Salt, the brief forerunner of Snackbar, each of which honed his cutting-edge skills and won him no small number of groupies: "Johnny Mac," they call him. But here at noisy P&K, in the space once occupied by Chaucer's at 20th and Lombard, he says, the food is not about him, not about "the celebrity chef thing.
NEWS
July 22, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The people who scout sites for Houlihan's "must be geniuses," Roger Berkowitz confides over the phone, practically giddy at having landed yet another abandoned fern-bar shell for his growing seafood chain, Legal Sea Foods. This one is in the Court at King of Prussia, the first Pennsylvania location for the Boston-based chain. And if the beeper-toting crowds waiting for a seat on a sweltering midsummer weeknight are any indication, Legal is already cashing in on the lucrative real estate wisdom handed down from the Chain Elders.
NEWS
December 26, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Irish pubs are nothing new, but one place in Ambler, the Shanachie, is about as authentic a place as I've ever seen. Or should I say, "Irish restaurant, I hardly knew ye. " The Shanachie (pronounced SHAN-ih-kee) opened in October in a former retail store opposite the historic Ambler movie theater. Its authenticity comes only partly from its role as a stage for live Irish music, and its hunter-green, dark-wood pub decor. The restaurant goes through about 30 cases of potatoes a week, but that, too, is only part of the story in this literary-theme restaurant (shanachie means "storyteller" in Gaelic)
NEWS
May 4, 2004 | By Jim Murray
The closest place I can go to sell my blood plasma is Indiana. I know this because I was recently looking into ways of making money without doing any work. I found there are few positions that offer this kind of compensation plan, and the ones that do have mostly been filled by government officials. Americans have always had a thirst for easy money, but we continue to find out that it is a mirage in the desert of avoiding honest work. For example, during the California Gold Rush, sellers of shovels and pans made more profit than many of the gold diggers.
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