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Fish Fry

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NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's the sour coleslaw, the cream coleslaw, the regular potato salad, the German potato salad, the three-bean salad. And pickles, the salted rye, the butter tubs. Out of the kitchen, on an endless parade of trays, comes some 800 pounds of crispy fried haddock. If it's Friday, this must be Wisconsin. In nearly every restaurant, supper club and corner tavern in the state - and few are the corners in this state without taverns - fish fries on Friday. So ingrained here are the weekly low-cost, all-you-can-eat feasts that bartender Chester Blaszczyk, who pulls beers for the regulars at Turners Hall in downtown Milwaukee, can't quite understand why an outlander would even ask. "No matter where you go, everybody's got fish fries on Friday," he says, stopping between the taps to scratch his gray crew-cut.
FOOD
March 24, 2011 | By Susan M. Selasky, Detroit Free Press
As Christians observe Lent, many are going meatless on Fridays, opting for fish. Many churches and other organizations get the fryers going for Friday fish fries, while fish specials appear on restaurant menus. When making a small amount of fried fish at home, I go the simple pan-fried route. It's easier, and there is no messing around with hot oil and lingering odors. For the coating, I dip the fillets in a bit of egg white and then simply dredge them in seasoned flour. If I want to use a wet batter for coating the fish, I prefer one that is on the thin side, like tempura, which is thinner than pancake batter.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The waters are frozen a dull gray around the red-and-white lighthouse here at the southern tip of Lake Michigan, but unlike most winters Chris Furness is not breaking through the ice to head out fishing. Instead, the fisherman is at his other job at the fire department, fretting about his bills and thinking that he and his wife may have to close the fish market that his father started and that has been a local institution for more than a quarter-century. Used to be Furness and his brother and father could fish just about year-round, hauling in thousands of pounds of Lake Michigan yellow perch, a tender, tasty delicacy favored by those who live along the lake's southern rim. But conservation officials, citing a dramatic decline in perch population in Lake Michigan, have put strict restrictions on commercial fishermen like the Furnesses.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There was no tartar sauce at the fish fry at Bell Lake on Friday. Electrical currents were sent into the lake to stun the fish so they could be easily pulled out and transported to their new home by a team of aquatic biologists. The fish were removed so the lake can be drained and dredged of silt and debris; it is scheduled to be refilled by the end of June. By the end of Friday, about 250 fish - carp, crappies, bluegills, catfish, and released pet goldfish - had been moved across Woodbury to Stewart Lake, city engineer Bill Fleming said.
NEWS
September 12, 1986 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
Jim, 11, wants to be, and plans to be, the best fisherman in the world. A staff worker at the group home where Jim lives says Jim is a professional. He puts the bait on precisely, casts in a fine style of his own and digs worms two days in advance. He puts the worms in a paper cup on the windowsill outside his room because there's a shade tree there. He worries that the dirt won't keep them cool enough, and sometimes he brings them in so that they won't be kidnapped by prank-playing worm thieves.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1989 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a success with John Steinbeck's Cannery Row, Recorded Books has just released the even-better sequel, Sweet Thursday (nine hours, $12.50 rental). A lot of the favorites are back - Mac and the boys, eternally thirsty, are still in their leaky shack, fondly dubbed the Palace Flophouse, and Doc is home from the war. Well-meaning Hazel is still a pint short of a quart, Eddie is still the bartender for Wide Ida at the Cafe La Ida, and Constable Joe Blaikey will still lend a bum a buck.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
AT THE END of Saturday's basketball practice, coaches John Dennis and Tim Hood offered a little advice to their pint-size players: Better pack enough underwear for the Small Fry International Basketball tournament at Disney World, they teased. Or they'd have to borrow some from the coaches. And nobody wants that. What the coaches didn't say is that the players might not be going anywhere. When Dennis and Hood formed the Philly All Stars last year, a lot of people made a lot of promises to the Small Fry team: sponsorship, donated gym time, jerseys.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stacks of documents - 120 to 160 volumes - are sitting on the desks of New Jersey environmental experts who must decide whether the Public Service Electric & Gas Co.'s permit to take three billion gallons of water a day from the Delaware River should be renewed. The water is used to cool the company's two Salem nuclear generators on the river in Lower Alloways Creek Township, and the five-year-old permit expires Monday. But whether the utility's permit renewal application contains 120 volumes (the Department of Environmental Protection estimate)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | By Janet Stanton, Special to The Inquirer
A bitterly cold January day generally sends people indoors to huddle by the fire. But this weekend you have a chance to try an activity that might change your mind about winter: Ice fishing. At the 10th annual ice-fishing clinic on Chester County's Struble Lake tomorrow, you can learn all the basics of this esoteric sport, from selection of line, bait and equipment to fish identification and ice safety. Take your down jacket. Though the clinic will take place, ice or no ice, the organizers are hoping for a cold day. "We always get more people if it's bitter cold," said Steven Jones, superintendent at Warwick, Chester County Park near the lake, "because that's part of the fun of the sport.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
Tradition has it that the sweet-flavored tilapia (tuh-LAH-pe-uh) was the fish St. Peter caught in the Sea of Galilee and the type Jesus multiplied to feed 5,000. Last month, "St. Peter's fish" came to Octorara High School as Chester County's first academic aquaculture crop. And if Octorara's 10th-grade Future Farmers of America succeed at fish farming, they will be treated to a fish fry at the end of the school year, said Frank Wasco, their teacher. "It's becoming more of a thing to do in Pennsylvania," said Wasco.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
AT THE END of Saturday's basketball practice, coaches John Dennis and Tim Hood offered a little advice to their pint-size players: Better pack enough underwear for the Small Fry International Basketball tournament at Disney World, they teased. Or they'd have to borrow some from the coaches. And nobody wants that. What the coaches didn't say is that the players might not be going anywhere. When Dennis and Hood formed the Philly All Stars last year, a lot of people made a lot of promises to the Small Fry team: sponsorship, donated gym time, jerseys.
FOOD
March 24, 2011 | By Susan M. Selasky, Detroit Free Press
As Christians observe Lent, many are going meatless on Fridays, opting for fish. Many churches and other organizations get the fryers going for Friday fish fries, while fish specials appear on restaurant menus. When making a small amount of fried fish at home, I go the simple pan-fried route. It's easier, and there is no messing around with hot oil and lingering odors. For the coating, I dip the fillets in a bit of egg white and then simply dredge them in seasoned flour. If I want to use a wet batter for coating the fish, I prefer one that is on the thin side, like tempura, which is thinner than pancake batter.
NEWS
May 29, 2010
In an often retold fable, a primitive philosopher asserts that the world sits atop a giant turtle. Asked what the turtle is standing on, he replies: another turtle. And that turtle? "Why," the philosopher says, "it's turtles all the way down!" Camden's city government appears to be laboring under a similarly reptilian illogic. In this most distressed of New Jersey's cities - only recently released from an unprecedented experiment in state receivership - some of the municipal workforce has been spending its time on what can only be described as a full-blown turtle hunt.
NEWS
May 29, 2010
In an often retold fable, a primitive philosopher asserts that the world sits atop a giant turtle. Asked what the turtle is standing on, he replies: another turtle. And that turtle? "Why," the philosopher says, "it's turtles all the way down!" Camden's city government appears to be laboring under a similarly reptilian illogic. In this most distressed of New Jersey's cities - only recently released from an unprecedented experiment in state receivership - some of the municipal workforce has been spending its time on what can only be described as a full-blown turtle hunt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If Jonathan McDonald got a little too big for his britches at a place called Snackbar with those escargot skewers, and crispy mackerel with fennel and apple gelee and some sort of powder derived from the dehydration of olive oil, he would like to make amends. Kick things down a notch. He is installed in the kitchen now at a gastropub four blocks south of that once-effete boite, and at this gig - called Pub & Kitchen ("P&K" to the locals) - it's an entirely different story. He is 30 now, with a baby on board, and he's got his feet more humbly planted: "It's the antithesis" of his last stop, he says - and, frankly, of his other finer-dining stops - Lacroix, West Philadelphia's Marigold Kitchen, and Salt, the brief forerunner of Snackbar, each of which honed his cutting-edge skills and won him no small number of groupies: "Johnny Mac," they call him. But here at noisy P&K, in the space once occupied by Chaucer's at 20th and Lombard, he says, the food is not about him, not about "the celebrity chef thing.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There was no tartar sauce at the fish fry at Bell Lake on Friday. Electrical currents were sent into the lake to stun the fish so they could be easily pulled out and transported to their new home by a team of aquatic biologists. The fish were removed so the lake can be drained and dredged of silt and debris; it is scheduled to be refilled by the end of June. By the end of Friday, about 250 fish - carp, crappies, bluegills, catfish, and released pet goldfish - had been moved across Woodbury to Stewart Lake, city engineer Bill Fleming said.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stacks of documents - 120 to 160 volumes - are sitting on the desks of New Jersey environmental experts who must decide whether the Public Service Electric & Gas Co.'s permit to take three billion gallons of water a day from the Delaware River should be renewed. The water is used to cool the company's two Salem nuclear generators on the river in Lower Alloways Creek Township, and the five-year-old permit expires Monday. But whether the utility's permit renewal application contains 120 volumes (the Department of Environmental Protection estimate)
SPORTS
November 1, 1996 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brad Greenberg, the 76ers' new general manager, has been searching for something ever since he arrived in Philadelphia last spring after spending the previous decade living on the Pacific Coast. "You look around here and it's hard to find," said Greenberg, 42. What's he talking about? A shot-blocking center to shore up the middle of the Sixers' defense? A playoff-savvy sixth man to come in and steady a team getting buffeted some night in Houston or Chicago? A team president whose personality type has fewer A's than those little batteries in tape recorders?
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The waters are frozen a dull gray around the red-and-white lighthouse here at the southern tip of Lake Michigan, but unlike most winters Chris Furness is not breaking through the ice to head out fishing. Instead, the fisherman is at his other job at the fire department, fretting about his bills and thinking that he and his wife may have to close the fish market that his father started and that has been a local institution for more than a quarter-century. Used to be Furness and his brother and father could fish just about year-round, hauling in thousands of pounds of Lake Michigan yellow perch, a tender, tasty delicacy favored by those who live along the lake's southern rim. But conservation officials, citing a dramatic decline in perch population in Lake Michigan, have put strict restrictions on commercial fishermen like the Furnesses.
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