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Fish Market

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | By STAN HOCHMAN, Daily News Restaurant Reviewer
They have increased the portions and lowered the prices at the Fish Market. They have hired cheerful waiters and waitresses. They have updated the menu. The changes are laudable. Now, if they would concentrate on the basic things . . . how to cook rice, how to make soup, how to grill tuna. On one visit the rice was littered with raisins, a terrible idea. The next time there were no raisins, but the rice was dry, hard and lukewarm. Seafood chowder was a tomato-based soup with bits of too-chewy clams.
FOOD
February 9, 1986 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Halfway through a recent lunch at the Fish Market, the restaurant's chef, Peter Howell, appeared at our table. A member of the staff had issued a critic alert, and Howell had responded by letting us know that we'd been spotted. Such candor is unusual and much appreciated. The same straightforward style seems reflected in the restaurant's food since Howell took over last summer. Each of his new menus has incorporated a few old Fish Market favorites but, for the most part, the dishes are new and pleasantly uncomplicated, the portions ample and the prices scaled down.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Christopher Jr., a fish-store handyman, yesterday was found guilty of first-degree murder in the stabbing death of a Frankford woman in an alley behind the fish market where he worked. "I was railroaded," Christopher, 38, blurted as he was escorted in handcuffs by sheriffs' deputies through a City Hall corridor after the verdict. "I didn't kill Carol Dowd. I did not even know Carol Dowd. I was implicated by prostitutes, that is, pipers, that the police put up. " A Common Pleas Court jury deliberated eight hours over two days before announcing a verdict on evidence that the prosecution acknowledged was circumstantial.
NEWS
August 2, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Three fish-market workers were arrested yesterday and charged in the theft last year of $7.9 million from a Wells Fargo depot, the largest cash robbery in U.S. history. Joseph Coffey, 49, Paul "Little Paulie" Mazzarese, 58, and John "Beansie" Campanella, 44, all of New York City, were ordered jailed until a bail hearing Wednesday by U.S. Magistrate Ruth Washington. The robbery took place April 29, 1985, when four masked men surprised Wells Fargo guards after midnight at one of the firm's facilities and took an estimated $7.9 million from the vault.
FOOD
August 20, 1986 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Food is big business in the 1980s - the ever-growing number of gourmet food shops and takeouts attests to that. And more are on the way. One of the most visible blossomings has been at the Reading Terminal Market, where the newest addition, the Reading Terminal Deli, will open in October. The market recently added a package checking service and curbside pickup. General manager David O'Neill says it is planning home delivery and an improvement program that could have the market air-conditioned and with new restrooms by next summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1987 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Daily News Sales Columnist
The venerable Fish Market restaurant, 18th and Sansom streets in Center City, recently joined the prix fixe early dinner trend. The particulars: For $11.95 a person, you get a pre-selected first course (soup or salad or appetizer, depending on what chef Peter Howell dreams up), a choice of main course (from three seafood entrees), a pre-selected dessert, and coffee or tea. Menus change weekly. On a recent visit to the restaurant, the meal began with wonderfully chewy rolls from a bakery in South Philly and a light (some might say thin)
NEWS
June 3, 2014
J ANET STECHMAN, 57, of South Philadelphia, co-owns Anastasi Seafood in the Italian Market. Her co-owner and brother, Salvatore Anastasi, is the buyer, while she runs the restaurant and oversees human resources and financials. The family-owned business also includes a fish market. Stechman recently finished the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program at the Community College of Philadelphia that helps businesses grow. Q: What did you learn during the program? A: It was the first time I actually left the business to work on the business.
NEWS
January 27, 1995 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Dan Rubin contributed to this article
Several more blighted Center City properties owned by the late Samuel Rappaport, including the site of the old Fish Market restaurant at 18th and Sansom Streets, might soon change hands. Real estate investor Ralph Heller said yesterday that he and a partner, Leroy Kean, had agreed to purchase the Fish Market building and a row of run- down properties in the 1600 block of Sansom Street. The deal, while not complete, is another indication that Rappaport's estate is acting to erase some of the blight associated with the speculator's vast inventory.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
SORRY, CHARLIE - THIS TUNA'S TOPS A tuna has gone for a record $50,160 in the year's first auction at Japan's largest fish market. The price for the 440-pound plump tuna was a record for a whole fish at the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo, said market spokesman Hiroshi Murano. It was among 4,312 tuna sold in a brisk, 30-minute auction before dawn on Thursday. Tuna is sold by weight, with the price set depending on how fatty the meat is. The tender tuna brought a hefty $114 per pound.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The waters are frozen a dull gray around the red-and-white lighthouse here at the southern tip of Lake Michigan, but unlike most winters Chris Furness is not breaking through the ice to head out fishing. Instead, the fisherman is at his other job at the fire department, fretting about his bills and thinking that he and his wife may have to close the fish market that his father started and that has been a local institution for more than a quarter-century. Used to be Furness and his brother and father could fish just about year-round, hauling in thousands of pounds of Lake Michigan yellow perch, a tender, tasty delicacy favored by those who live along the lake's southern rim. But conservation officials, citing a dramatic decline in perch population in Lake Michigan, have put strict restrictions on commercial fishermen like the Furnesses.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Greenberg's commitment to local seafood runs deep - so deep that the Manhattan-based writer once slurped down an oyster he'd plucked from the muck of New York Harbor, eliciting a gasp from a city official standing nearby. But the author of the newly released American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood (Penguin) is aware there's a tidal wave of forces working against him. Today, 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, even as a third of the domestic catch is shipped overseas.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
J ANET STECHMAN, 57, of South Philadelphia, co-owns Anastasi Seafood in the Italian Market. Her co-owner and brother, Salvatore Anastasi, is the buyer, while she runs the restaurant and oversees human resources and financials. The family-owned business also includes a fish market. Stechman recently finished the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program at the Community College of Philadelphia that helps businesses grow. Q: What did you learn during the program? A: It was the first time I actually left the business to work on the business.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter Moody, 93, of Philadelphia, who partnered with a friend on a chain of small grocery stores and went on to found other businesses, died Saturday, April 26, of heart disease at Lankenau Hospital. A graduate of Central High School, he grew up on Myrtle Street in North Philadelphia in the 1920s. At the time, the area was a melting pot for families of different nationalities. Mr. Moody befriended Irwin Rosenzweig, whose father ran a dry goods store. The friendship endured; when Mr. Moody wanted to act on his belief that a man should own a business, he turned to Rosenzweig for help.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keith Leaphart is very much like the squad of superheroes on the life-size action poster behind his desk: He has two identities, one he uses when engaging educators about at-risk youth and the other comes to life when hosting parties. He takes big risks, such as the time he invested $5,000 of his medical school scholarship money in a cleaning business. He saves the day: Hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons hired Leaphart in 2006 to promote a sneaker line that failed to launch in Philly.
FOOD
January 12, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
To say the region is in a brewpub frenzy is no understatement. Iron Hill just opened its ninth location, in Chestnut Hill, and is planning a 10th in South Jersey in 2013. In Ambler, Forest & Main Brewing Co. is due to open toward the end of the month. A bit further off is Ardmore's Tired Hands Brewing Co. Opening last month: Bill Mangan's third McKenzie Brew House , a bright, tasteful transformation of the Charlie Brown's Steakhouse in Valley Fair Shopping Center off Route 202 (324 W. Swedesford Rd., Berwyn, 610-407-4300)
FOOD
March 18, 2010 | By Aliza Green FOR THE INQUIRER
The Lenten tradition of meatless meals and the warm-weather appeal of eating lighter makes fish popular fare as the seasons change. Spring also brings Passover seder dinners with gefilte fish, which ambitious home cooks make using fresh-ground whitefish, pike, and carp. But buying fish is often a challenge. It was true in my days as a chef, but it is even more perplexing as a home cook without the great wholesale sources available to the restaurant trade. For a fine kettle of the freshest fish at the best price, make friends with a dedicated fishmonger at a market that moves a lot of fish.
NEWS
August 23, 2006 | David Holahan
David Holahan is a freelance writer from East Haddam, Conn. I always felt uneasy driving back from the fish market with my grandmother while that heavy-duty foil-lined bag full of squiggling, doomed lobsters was at my feet. This was a little too close to the food chain for my suburban taste. Back at the beach cottage, she would place the animated bag in the middle of the dining room table while she unloaded the other groceries. Each time I checked, the congregation had moved a little closer to the edge.
NEWS
July 14, 2003
A CO-WORKER of mine buys the Daily News, which I occasionally read. But I've stopped because, other than sports, it is depressing, exploitative and disturbing. I realize that "bad" news may sell papers (or so it's thought). But I think that adding "good" news or even publishing a separate paper focusing on positive news will not only be a welcome change to your current readers, but will also entice readers like me to buy it. I am not saying the positive articles need to be boring or sappy, but I know that for every person who has committed a horrid crime, there are many more that are heroes.
NEWS
March 21, 2003
NEIL Stein actually broke into the restaurant business before 1973. He was part owner of a restaurant at Cedarbrook Hill Apartments called Mimi Says in the late '60s. His partner was Ron Dushoff, whose father, David, was part owner of the Latin Casino in Cherry Hill. My grandfather was the bandleader at the Latin for many years. Neil's dad owned a grocery store on Wadsworth Avenue in Mt. Airy called the Fish Market. Neil's choice of a name for his first restaurant in Center City was likely no coincidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Looking forward to a big seafood dinner at a Jersey resort this summer? What you find on the menu may surprise you. One thing that's missing: Chilean sea bass. This popular fish, once prevalent in Antarctic waters, has recently shown signs of depletion. In the past few months, the endangered fish has virtually disappeared from restaurant menus. Jersey shore eateries readying for another summer tourist season have found an array of replacements. Some go for other cold-water fish like wild Alaskan salmon or Canadian halibut.
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