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Fish Oil

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NEWS
March 4, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Eating large amounts of oily fish, such as salmon, tuna and trout, appears to change the structure of the heart, protects against heart attacks and reduces the damage from heart attacks that do occur, according to a study announced yesterday in Camden. The study using groups of rats adds dramatic new evidence supporting the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids on the human heart, say experimenters from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey's School of Osteopathic Medicine.
FOOD
February 8, 1989 | The Inquirer staff
Eating fish oil can lower the body's production of two important substances that cause inflammation, and this may explain why fish oil sometimes seems to relieve arthritis and other diseases, researchers report. The researchers studied the effects in the blood when nine healthy people took 18 fish oil capsules a day for six weeks. "We found a very dramatic reduction in the ability of their white blood cells to make tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1," Dr. Charles A. Dinarello said.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
A university scientist presented further evidence yesterday suggesting that fish oil prevents heart disease. In recent years, several studies have concluded that the oil, which can be ingested by eating fish or by taking capsule supplements, reduces the risk of heart attacks. Carl E. Hock, a professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Camden, said there was yet another facet to the oil's remarkable powers over the heart. Tests on laboratory rats show that the fatty acids in fish oil invade the membrane of heart cells and protect it in the event of reduced blood flow, known as myocardial ischemia, Hock said yesterday.
NEWS
September 8, 2005 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Americans love their fish oil - and so do many of their doctors, which makes this "natural" remedy different from most others. That's because it has something other healing products in the marketplace lack: Science behind its health claims. Studies show that the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil can reduce heart-attack risk by preventing blood clots and abnormal heart rhythms, which cause sudden death. OK, so it tastes a little fishy and sometimes causes burping or diarrhea.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fish oil supplements can sharply lower cholesterol and other blood fats and possibly prevent coronary artery disease, several researchers reported at a scientific conference in Philadelphia yesterday. "I've become an advocate of fish-oil capsules, based on research I've done and much more I've examined," said Dr. Michael Davidson, a cardiologist at Rush Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago, after his technical presentation at the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania professor who studies psychopaths has found hope for improving human behavior in a surprising place: fish oil. A new study led by Adrian Raine, a psychologist in Penn's criminology department, found giving children a fruit drink mixed with omega-3 fatty acids - a key ingredient in fish oil - improved their behavior. Strangely, the behavior of parents also improved, even though they weren't taking the supplements. More on that later. Raine's ultimate goal is ambitious: to reduce crime.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fish oil, one of the most popular new diet supplements, can sharply lower "bad" cholesterol, increase "good" cholesterol and, in the process, can apparently reduce the risk of heart attack, according to three Philadelphia medical researchers. Their findings, scheduled to be published early next year in a cardiology research journal, are the latest in a series of medical reports concluding that the kinds of unsaturated oils found in fish have a variety of protective and beneficial effects in the body.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
WHOOPING-COUGH VACCINE Fear not, parents. Whooping-cough vaccine, hit by allegations during the last decade that it can cause seizures, rarely if ever will do so in healthy children, according to a study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. One pediatrician says the finding means it's time to end the "myth" about the seizures caused by DPT injections and the resulting wave of litigation against doctors and drug firms. Failure to immunize has caused a surge in whooping-cough cases.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Former professional wrestling star "Nature Boy" Buddy Rogers knew something smelled bad about the fish oil deal, but he got hooked anyway, according to a federal lawsuit. The retired bleached-blond rassler from Haddonfield, N.J. says he loaned $15,000 in May to a man involved in a fish oil firm called Joseph's Marine Lipids. The suit says Joseph Carlozo, of Cherry Hill, had promised to pay back the loan in a month, plus interest, but so far Rogers has received only $3,300. Rogers, an announcer for local TV wrestling shows, also names Samuel DelRossi, of Marmora, N.J., as a defendant for introducing him to Carlozo and vouching for his honesty.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What's your opinion of krill oil? Do you think it's better than fish oil? Answer: There are many manufacturers and distributors that would like you to believe that the oil of krill, a tiny shrimplike creature found in the deep waters of the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, is superior to fish oil in terms of its protection against heart disease, reduction of triglycerides and cholesterol, arthritis pain, menstrual pain, stroke...
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NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania professor who studies psychopaths has found hope for improving human behavior in a surprising place: fish oil. A new study led by Adrian Raine, a psychologist in Penn's criminology department, found giving children a fruit drink mixed with omega-3 fatty acids - a key ingredient in fish oil - improved their behavior. Strangely, the behavior of parents also improved, even though they weren't taking the supplements. More on that later. Raine's ultimate goal is ambitious: to reduce crime.
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holy mackerel! Or, in light of a new study, "unholy" might be more appropriate. Omega-3 fatty acids derived from oil in fatty fish like mackerel, tuna, and salmon are still endorsed by doctors for controlling blood fats in heart disease. But when it comes to preventing cancer, the verdict has gotten murky. A study published in July found omega-3 may raise the risk of prostate cancer. "This is not a happy finding," said Theodore Brasky, who led the study at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Eating fish is good for your heart, but taking fish-oil capsules does not help people at high risk of heart problems who are already taking medicines to prevent them, a large study in Italy found. The work makes clearer who does and does not benefit from taking supplements of the good oils found in fish such as salmon, tuna, and sardines. Previous studies have suggested that fish-oil capsules could lower heart risks in people with heart failure or who have already suffered a heart attack.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | BY STACEY BURLING, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seems as though someone is always pushing a new wonder supplement to restore health the natural way. Is there good evidence that any actually work for people with heart disease or those at risk for it? We asked four area cardiologists what they thought. They are: Daniel Rader, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Preventive Cardiovascular Program; David Shipon, who has a special focus on prevention and integrative medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital; Sara Sirna, who directs Temple University Hospital's lipid clinic, and David Becker, who practices in Flourtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
One of the enduring tragedies of fair Ireland, beset by recurring economic woes, is that it loses many of its best and brightest, who, in search of opportunity, emigrate, most often to the United States. A sterling example of this brain drain is Garret FitzGerald, who was born in Dublin, and came here the first time at age 18 to take a summer job driving a Coca-Cola truck. Since then, he has risen fast and far. After earning his medical degree at University College in Dublin, FitzGerald eventually returned to the United States and during the 1980s ran the clinical pharmacology division at Vanderbilt University.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
'90s whooping cough vaccine weakens faster than thought As the U.S. wrestles with its biggest whooping cough outbreak in decades, researchers appear to have zeroed in on the main cause: The safer vaccine that was introduced in the 1990s loses effectiveness much faster than previously thought. A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that the protective effect weakens dramatically soon after a youngster gets the last of the five recommended shots around age 6. The protection rate falls from about 95 percent to 71 percent within five years, said researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Research Center in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What's your opinion of krill oil? Do you think it's better than fish oil? Answer: There are many manufacturers and distributors that would like you to believe that the oil of krill, a tiny shrimplike creature found in the deep waters of the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, is superior to fish oil in terms of its protection against heart disease, reduction of triglycerides and cholesterol, arthritis pain, menstrual pain, stroke...
NEWS
September 8, 2005 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Americans love their fish oil - and so do many of their doctors, which makes this "natural" remedy different from most others. That's because it has something other healing products in the marketplace lack: Science behind its health claims. Studies show that the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil can reduce heart-attack risk by preventing blood clots and abnormal heart rhythms, which cause sudden death. OK, so it tastes a little fishy and sometimes causes burping or diarrhea.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Someone devised a primitive fire bomb in an apparent attempt to torch Oreland Sheet Metal Co., a manufacturing plant, over the weekend. The would-be arsonist or arsonists hurled a 5-gallon can containing gasoline through a window and tossed burning shreds of cardboard in after it. When flames did not rise, police said yesterday, a pack of matches was lighted and flung through the window, seven feet off the ground. Still, the gas in the can - capped closed with a safety valve - did not burn.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
WHOOPING-COUGH VACCINE Fear not, parents. Whooping-cough vaccine, hit by allegations during the last decade that it can cause seizures, rarely if ever will do so in healthy children, according to a study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. One pediatrician says the finding means it's time to end the "myth" about the seizures caused by DPT injections and the resulting wave of litigation against doctors and drug firms. Failure to immunize has caused a surge in whooping-cough cases.
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