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Fish Story

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NEWS
April 14, 1990
Industry spokesmen lament that it will put many tuna fishermen out of business. A pity, but if the alternative is the possible extinction of a mammal with as much right to be here as we have, maybe some in that endangered human species ought to find another line of work. It's not sappy or bleeding-heart to challenge a technique of fishing for tuna that results in the unnecessary death of thousands of dolphins. It's not starry-eyed or anti-business to oppose this slaughter, especially when the "purse-seine net" method is not the only way to catch tuna.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | By CHRIS SATULLO
A fable for a Newt-onian universe: Once upon a time, a lord lived in a manor surrounded by lush and lovely woods. Through these woods burbled a sparkling brook. The Lord of the Manor loved two things: fishing, and friends who loved fishing. So he stocked his clean, cold stream with as many fat and feisty trout as it could hold. Anglers came from far and wide to sup at his table and fish in his brook. It was a grand place to fish, with trout so plentiful no man could fail to get many a nibble - but so spirited no man could help but believe his skill alone had caught them.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Mike Shoup, Inquirer Travel Editor
Take a few thousand fish of striking sizes and colors - from vicious- looking, 10-foot-long, gray sand tiger sharks down to dainty, powder-blue surgeonfish that measure a few inches, nose to tailfin. Put the fish in gargantuan tanks of filtered saltwater, where it's possible for mere humans to meet them practically face to face. Construct an eye-catching building, with color panels on the walls, soaring glass pyramids on top and a long scribble of blue neon on the side that tells the night of the aquarium's flamboyant form and dramatic harborside location.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Lisa Greene, Special to The Inquirer
Eight-year-old Brian Baur, an energetic youngster with tousled brown hair and an infectious grin, was participating in a childhood rite of passage. With a dozen of his schoolmates, Brian journeyed Saturday to a pond at Green Bank Farm in Marple, where Sue Lucas, a social studies teacher at Penncrest Senior High School, helped Brian cast his first fishing line and then handed the rod over to him. Just a few minutes later, Brian reeled in his first fish. "Let me see!" he demanded as the glistening fish lay wriggling in Lucas' outstretched palm.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | BY DAVE BARRY
Like many people, I have had a lifelong yearning to give up my humdrum daily existence and go to sea and get one or more of my hands bitten off. This is how I found myself recently in a shark-fishing tournament. It was run by a University of Miami marine biologist, Dr. Samuel H. "Sonny" Gruber, who actually likes sharks. "I've worked with them so long," he says, "they're almost like family. " He's not kidding. In a recent article for Natural History magazine, Gruber described how he and an assistant roped a large pregnant lady lemon shark to the side of their boat, after which Gruber reached inside the shark's birth canal and pulled out nine little baby sharks.
SPORTS
November 20, 1992 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
You've just seen A River Runs Through It and something is stuck in your craw. Craig Sheffer, Brad Pitt and Tom Skerritt are pretty good actors, but did they really catch fish? Did they use stuff like antique bamboo fly rods and silk fly lines? And what about waders? Why did these guys stand in the river wearing nothing but boots, pants and a shirt? You need answers. So we put in a call to John Bailey, who runs Dan Bailey's Fly Shop in Livingston, Mont. Bailey was hired to be the movie's fly-fishing adviser by director Robert Redford, who wanted the action sequences to be beyond reproach.
NEWS
October 4, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the 18th century, local settlers used the Schuylkill, as well as lesser streams, to power mills and as an avenue of travel by boat. But the river also was a source of food. Before the Schuylkill was dammed and polluted by iron forges and sewage, shoals of fish including shad, herring, rockfish and sturgeon swam from Delaware Bay upriver to spawn. For those whose farms ran down to the bank of the river, that represented another crop to harvest. According to reports in the library of the Historical Society of Montgomery County, one local historian, Samuel W. Pennypacker, had a collection of 18th-century spearheads four to six inches long that were used for fishing and that were found in channels of the river near Phoenixville.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was 365 million years ago. Pennsylvania was tropical and swampy and below the equator. Now-extinct fish species swam in the water. The only creatures walking on the land were bugs - at least that's what scientists thought until Ted Daeschler found his amazing bone. Yesterday, the phone rang incessantly at the Academy of Natural Science as writers from the London Times, the New York Times, USA Today and elsewhere called with questions about Ted's excellent discovery. The big find is a 3-inch fossilized bone that came from one of the earliest creatures to emerge from the sea. It crawled onto the land 150 million years before the first dinosaurs.
SPORTS
October 27, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
It had been described as the Fallen Classic, a pale imitation featuring inferior teams, and a largely ignored one at that. Just maybe redemption was available on a single Sunday evening, though, at a worship service attended by more than 67,000 of the faithful. For this night, the disbelievers were silenced and those who spoke the blasphemies left mute. Edgar Renteria's bases-loaded single in the bottom of the 11th inning gave the Florida Marlins a 3-2 win over the Cleveland Indians in Game 7 of the World Series and touched off a loud and frenzied celebration at Pro Player Stadium.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hold a dead octopus up to a room full of elementary school students and the reaction is almost certainly a resounding "eww. " Trying to convince the students that the slimy, tentacled creature is, in fact, a healthy source of protein is no easy chore after moans of disgust, but this was the task at hand Monday at Springville Elementary School in Mount Laurel. Students from the K-4 school gathered in Springville's cafeteria to watch as Ian Knox, executive chef at Blair House in Washington, and representatives from Samuels & Son Seafood Co., a national wholesale company founded in Philadelphia, and Whole Foods stressed the importance of healthy eating with cooking demonstrations and prizes.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Barry Kratchman's experience more than 40 years ago - as a teenager, he watched in "horror" as an eel's head and body each continued to wriggle well after being separated - might seem gross. It was gross. But it also proved something important, he insists now: that his friend - the one behind the beheading, the one who wanted to experience what eel tasted like when filleted, breaded, and baked - would make a tremendous business partner because he wasn't afraid to try new things.
NEWS
February 17, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's the one about the lady who caught a state-record bluefish off the Jersey Shore and for decades bemoaned serving it up for dinner instead of having it mounted to hang over the easy chair in her den. Or the guy who lost everything in a series of tragedies, including a house fire, but desperately wanted to recover the only tangible link to his two sons: fishing-tournament certificates from family vacations in Wildwood. So go the fish stories cast over the 75 years that Cape May County has been sponsoring an annual tournament.
FOOD
December 17, 2009 | By Elisa Ludwig FOR THE INQUIRER
For a very long time, I dreamed of seven fishes. In the center of my mind's flat-screen there was a long table dressed in Christmas Eve finery, overflowing with platters of fried smelts, spaghetti with anchovies, grilled sardines, steamed mussels, baked stuffed clams, golden calamari rings, and perhaps a whole fish stuffed with lemon and herbs. Because this fantasy was set in Philly, a lovable Italian American matron lorded over the meal, Isgro's cannolis were served, and strings of twinkling lights were suspended above a block of rowhouses.
NEWS
August 25, 2009
Our 'welfare' is a job for government A letter writer Thursday ("Overstated government role") implored us all to read the Constitution with regard to the question of the government's obligation to provide health care, arguing that it is not the government's responsibility. Ignoring the fact that the Constitution says nothing about the appropriate economic system for this great republic, I would like to draw his attention to the preamble. By reading it, we learn that one of the stated goals of the Constitution is to "promote the general welfare" of the country.
SPORTS
June 25, 2006 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The weeks before the NBA draft are frantic for general managers, who spend long periods on the telephone, trying to position themselves in the best possible slot to take some raw youngster, who may or may not be available by the time their turn rolls around. That, according to 76ers president and general manager Billy King, is when the fun starts. "There's a lot of lying going on and a lot of fish stories going on," King said. "I don't put the blame just on the other teams.
NEWS
December 25, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
At the center of Tim Burton's lush new fairy tale is Edward Bloom, a Big Fish who lives so large that, to hear him tell it, where he swims the minnows are whale-sized. Edward, played in his prime by robust Ewan McGregor and on his deathbed by crusty Albert Finney, is an Alabama gallant and traveling salesman who weaves stories out of whole cloth, then embroiders them in crimson reds and canary yellows. Or so it seems to his estranged son, Will (Billy Crudup), a journalist who views the truth in black and white.
NEWS
July 28, 2003
Camden's waterfront is a surprisingly exciting scene these days. And it's about to get much better. The Tweeter Center, the New Jersey State Aquarium, the USS New Jersey and Campbell's Field, home of the minor-league Riversharks, have been in place for a while. Now, just as light-rail cars get ready to run on the new Camden-to-Trenton line and yuppies prepare to move into the luxury apartments in the former RCA building, Camden has hooked another really big fish. After weeks of bureaucratic dawdling finally ended, Steiner & Associates got its deal to expand and dramatically revive the aquarium, while building a retail center in stages on the riverfront between the ballpark and aquarium.
NEWS
August 9, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a small room off Logan Circle, the fanged jaw of a 6-foot-long, meat-eating fish is emerging from the dawn of time. Bit by bit, a tiny pneumatic hammer reveals a 375-million-year-old fossil from what is now northern Canada, a sluggish creature that used its knifelike teeth to chomp on smaller, armor-plated fish. In all probability, say researchers from the Academy of Natural Sciences and the University of Chicago, it is a new species - a distant cousin of the prehistoric "fish with fingers" they found in Pennsylvania in 1995.
NEWS
May 18, 2002 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There is a tale at the end of every fish story. And Michael Klems' may end up barring him from walking down the aisle with classmates at the Octorara Area High School graduation. Accused of killing 25 tilapia fish by poisoning a school fish tank with Dawn dish detergent, Klems, who received five days' suspension and a 30-day in-school probation, has been banned from the June 14 graduation exercises and has had senior privileges revoked until he pays $258.92 in restitution. But, instead of paying up, Klems has filed a lawsuit, saying the school violated his civil rights.
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