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Fishing Expedition

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BUSINESS
September 14, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An attorney for Rohm & Haas Co. denied yesterday that the Philadelphia chemical-maker had engaged in fraud in addressing a spate of brain cancers at its research facility, in the company's first courtroom appearance since an attorney sued on behalf of two of at least 12 cancer patients. Addressing Court of Common Pleas Judge Jacqueline Allen, Dennis R. Suplee accused the plaintiffs of going on an improper "fishing expedition" in their quest for documents and depositions from senior company officials.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A Common Pleas judge ruled yesterday that the files of Women Organized Against Rape are confidential and cannot be reviewed by an accused rapist. Anthony Sodroski, the attorney for Frank Quick, 30, of Loney Street near Eastwood Avenue, had sought to review WOAR's interview with a 14-year-old rape victim before it was turned over for use at Quick's pending trial. The girl was counseled by WOAR after she was raped on May 21 in Northeast Philadelphia. Judge William J. Mazzola, siding with WOAR, granted a motion by WOAR attorney Patricia A. McInerney to quash Sodroski's subpoena for the files.
NEWS
November 6, 1995 | Daily News wire services
TRENTON VOICES TOLD MAN TO DISMEMBER SELF? A 37-year-old Trenton man cut off his penis with a nine-inch kitchen knife in a failed suicide attempt Saturday, according to police. Authorities were withholding the victim's identity and medical condition yesterday. Police said they responded to an early-morning 911 call from the victim's father. They arrived at the Pennington Avenue home to find the injured man sitting, bleeding, in a living room chair. Police found the penis in the victim's upstairs bedroom.
NEWS
June 17, 2008
If the attorneys for slots-parlor-owner and felon Louis DeNaples want to go on a fishing expedition, they should rent a boat and head to the Jersey Shore. Instead, DeNaples' attorneys are trolling for alleged leaks to the news media stemming from a grand jury investigation involving DeNaples. Earlier this year, a grand jury indicted DeNaples on perjury charges for allegedly lying to state gambling regulators about his relationships with organized-crime figures and people linked to the corruption probe of City Hall under then-Mayor John F. Street.
NEWS
July 10, 1996 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
About an hour before star athlete Aimee Willard was attacked on an I-476 exit ramp, murder suspect Andrew Kobak was driving on the same highway, his lawyer said yesterday. The lawyer wouldn't say how close Kobak was to the scene of the crime. But he said the ex-tow truck worker was back at his family's Bryn Mawr home before he could have dumped Willard's body 17 miles away in North Philadelphia. "It would have been impossible for him to do the things for the commission of this crime," said lawyer Anthony Petrone.
NEWS
November 5, 1993 | By JOYLON P. GIRARD
Sex, blackmail, and a semi-secret diary with who knows what. Who needs Days of Our Lives when we can watch the news and see what the Senate Ethics Committee has dug out of Sen. Bob Packwood's diaries. In Act I last November, 10 women accused the Oregon Republican of making sexual advances. Other women then came forward. Packwood denied, then admitted unwelcome behavior, saying it occurred while under the influence of alcohol. Subsequently, he was accused of making threats and intimidating his accusers.
NEWS
March 21, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bush stands behind Gonzales, blasts 'fishing expedition' WASHINGTON - President Bush yesterday offered unqualified support for Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and teed up a confrontation with the Democratic Congress by refusing to allow top aides, including political operative Karl Rove, to testify under oath before the congressional committees looking into the firing of federal prosecutors. Bush said he would release more documents, including all e-mails between the White House and the Justice Department.
NEWS
March 28, 2007 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael L. Krancer, a Republican candidate for state Supreme Court, lives in a $1.7 million home atop a rolling hill in Bryn Mawr with a pool and a cabana. Taxes alone were $42,000 a year. Then there is private-school tuition for his two daughters and his five cars, including two Mercedes-Benzes. There's just no way he could afford all this on his $127,000 salary as a judge with the state's Environmental Hearing Board, lawyers for a challenger argued yesterday. They asked a state judge to bump Krancer from the May 15 primary ballot, claiming he had failed to disclose other sources of income.
NEWS
July 28, 2008
HOW IS IT that the person who shot and killed Sgt. Liczbinski had 17 priors and was out walking around until he killed someone? And now this Richard Wilson person was shooting at police officers yesterday. Why in God's name is a convicted murderer allowed to be out waiting to kill somebody else? The news stated that he did around 20 years for his conviction, and he got arrested again in 2005 only to be let out again. So maybe the system is waiting for a cop to get killed or some innocent bystander taken down.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | By Dwight Ott and Maureen Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Nancy Phillips contributed to this article
Camden County authorities have asked a number of Camden city agencies to turn over records of dealings they have had over the last five years with four companies, including one that was co-owned by Mayor Milton Milan. According to some city officials who received them, subpoenas for the records have been issued by a Camden County grand jury to at least a half dozen agencies, including the city's purchasing and payroll departments, the city clerk's and attorney's offices, as well as the housing and parking authorities.
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SPORTS
October 23, 2009 | By ED BARKOWITZ, barkowe@phillynews.com
Men have a funny way of showing affection for one another, especially men who play sports for a living. It is often brusque and never flowery. Basically, if your chops aren't being busted, you're probably not one of the boys. Cliff Lee became a Phillie on July 29 and promptly reeled off five gems. Those performances surely endeared him to his new teammates, who reciprocated when the Daily News featured Lee in two of our popular power pages this month. Sensing an opportunity to have fun at Lee's expense, a teammate tacked the two-page poster up to the humble lefthander's locker stall.
NEWS
July 28, 2008
HOW IS IT that the person who shot and killed Sgt. Liczbinski had 17 priors and was out walking around until he killed someone? And now this Richard Wilson person was shooting at police officers yesterday. Why in God's name is a convicted murderer allowed to be out waiting to kill somebody else? The news stated that he did around 20 years for his conviction, and he got arrested again in 2005 only to be let out again. So maybe the system is waiting for a cop to get killed or some innocent bystander taken down.
NEWS
June 17, 2008
If the attorneys for slots-parlor-owner and felon Louis DeNaples want to go on a fishing expedition, they should rent a boat and head to the Jersey Shore. Instead, DeNaples' attorneys are trolling for alleged leaks to the news media stemming from a grand jury investigation involving DeNaples. Earlier this year, a grand jury indicted DeNaples on perjury charges for allegedly lying to state gambling regulators about his relationships with organized-crime figures and people linked to the corruption probe of City Hall under then-Mayor John F. Street.
NEWS
March 28, 2007 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael L. Krancer, a Republican candidate for state Supreme Court, lives in a $1.7 million home atop a rolling hill in Bryn Mawr with a pool and a cabana. Taxes alone were $42,000 a year. Then there is private-school tuition for his two daughters and his five cars, including two Mercedes-Benzes. There's just no way he could afford all this on his $127,000 salary as a judge with the state's Environmental Hearing Board, lawyers for a challenger argued yesterday. They asked a state judge to bump Krancer from the May 15 primary ballot, claiming he had failed to disclose other sources of income.
NEWS
March 21, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bush stands behind Gonzales, blasts 'fishing expedition' WASHINGTON - President Bush yesterday offered unqualified support for Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and teed up a confrontation with the Democratic Congress by refusing to allow top aides, including political operative Karl Rove, to testify under oath before the congressional committees looking into the firing of federal prosecutors. Bush said he would release more documents, including all e-mails between the White House and the Justice Department.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An attorney for Rohm & Haas Co. denied yesterday that the Philadelphia chemical-maker had engaged in fraud in addressing a spate of brain cancers at its research facility, in the company's first courtroom appearance since an attorney sued on behalf of two of at least 12 cancer patients. Addressing Court of Common Pleas Judge Jacqueline Allen, Dennis R. Suplee accused the plaintiffs of going on an improper "fishing expedition" in their quest for documents and depositions from senior company officials.
NEWS
February 8, 2002
Enron, Cheney and the energy task force Unless the General Accounting Office has specific allegations of fraud or corruption perpetrated by Vice President Cheney's energy task force, it should back off ("The risk of White House secrecy," Feb. 3). Otherwise, it is simply involved in a fishing expedition. That the GAO reduced its original demands is irrelevant. Fishing is fishing, regardless of the method one uses. There is no parallel between this situation and Hillary Rodham Clinton's health-care debacle.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | By Steve Esack INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Many school districts and municipalities have one or more: That person or group that, for whatever reason, scrutinizes and dissects budgets, policies and personnel decisions, sometimes to the chagrin of officials. In the Upper Darby School District, one of those people is Marcia Brunelli of Drexel Hill. So when the school board recently announced that it was considering a new policy to charge taxpayers 25 cents a copy - plus $25 in clerical services and $60 in administrative services - "to obtain copies of existing public records," Brunelli took it as an affront.
NEWS
November 19, 1998
Kenneth Starr won't break down during his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee and confess to being part of a "right-wing conspiracy" to get Bill Clinton. He doesn't have the mark of the squealer about him. And, as an experienced appellate litigator and former federal appeals court judge, Starr won't be rattled by hostile questions. So it may be too much to expect a lot of drama during opening day for the impeachment hearing. But it's not too much to expect the truth. Clinton made the country go through a gut-wrenching experience, but he finally told the truth about his illicit affair with Monica Lewinsky.
NEWS
October 7, 1998
The inquiry into impeaching President Clinton calls for all the open-mindedness and fair-mindedness that Congress can summon. It challenges Republicans and Democrats alike to act not as partisans or weather vanes, but as citizens attuned to the gravity of deciding whether to remove an elected president from office. If given the go-ahead by the full House, will members of the Judiciary Committee, an unmelted pot of conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats, rise to this challenge?
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