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Fishing Industry

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NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a pool of more than $75 million in federal appropriations for fisheries disaster relief from Hurricane Sandy and other storm damage, at only $1.5 million, New Jersey has received a pittance compared with other regions, according to state legislators and anglers associations. Marine industry losses in both commercial and recreational fishing because of Sandy have been estimated at $121 million in New Jersey and $77 million in New York state. The two states have been told to split $3 million being allocated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service for the recovery, officials said.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2010
M Session: Pa. House Approp. Committee; N.J. Assembly Labor Comm., jobless benefit claims; Assembly Environ., effect of gulf oil spill on N.J. Shore and fishing industry. T Released: Treas. int'l money flows; Nat'l Assoc. of Home Builders' market index. Session: U.S. Senate Energy/Natural Resources Comm., solar rebates, loans. W Released for May: U.S. Labor Dept.'s Producer Price Index; Commerce's housing starts. Session: U.S. Senate Aging Comm.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new species of ugly fish may not be exactly what the world has been waiting for, but that is what Academy of Natural Sciences researcher Dominique Dagit found in New Zealand. The new species, which Dagit named Chimaera panthera or the leopard chimaera, is an ancient relative of the shark. About three feet long with brown spots, the fish is only the sixth recorded Chimaera species in the world. "The ocean is the last great unknown on Earth," Dagit said, "and it is the place where we have the greatest likelihood of finding new species.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Rod McGuirk, Associated Press
CANBERRA, Australia - Australia has created the world's largest network of marine reserves and will restrict fishing as well as oil and gas exploration in a major step to safeguard the environment and access to food. With the expansion announced Thursday, Australia will protect 1.2 million square miles of ocean. The reserves will encompass a third of the island continent's territorial waters, which sustain more than 4,000 species of fish. Australia is surrounded by the world's third-largest ocean territory, which provides important habitat to threatened species of whales, sharks and turtles as well as spectacular corals.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
F.J. O'Hara & Sons Inc., once a major supplier of frozen fish to the U.S. Armed Forces, has admitted conspiring for years with other seafood suppliers to rig bids on government contracts worth millions of dollars. The company, based in Rockland, Maine, and its president, Francis J. O'Hara Sr., were charged with bid-rigging activity yesterday in federal court in Philadelphia, where the Defense Department buys its seafood. O'Hara and his firm are cooperating with federal authorities, and each defendant has agreed to plead guilty after the case is transferred to federal court in Maine, according to his attorney, A. Hugh Scott, of Boston.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie's administration filed a complaint Friday in federal court in an attempt to stop a seismic testing project the state argues will harm fishing industries and marine life. The action was praised by several environmental groups, which said the testing that began this week in federal waters southeast of Long Beach Island would hurt endangered whales, among other species, and would lead to oil and gas exploration and extraction. Proponents of the project, which is being conducted by Rutgers University with federal funding, say it will help scientists study sea-level rise.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By Steve Stecklow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boat captain Salvatore Napoli fondly recalls how, just a decade ago, he and his fishing mates would chug out to the ocean and, in a week, net up to 40 tons of cod, haddock, flounder and other bottom-dwelling fish. Last week, after 10 days at sea, he returned with a quarter of that haul. "Today, we don't bring in much fish," said Napoli, 38, a native of Sicily who has been fishing off the New England coast for 18 years. All around him, orange-suited laborers were unloading the 75-foot boat and packing piles of glistening fish into ice-filled shipping containers.
NEWS
July 31, 1997 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Senate yesterday voted - 99 to 0 - to allow tuna to be sold in the United States even if it is caught in large nets that encircle both the fish and dolphins. It also voted to allow the term "dolphin safe" to be used for such tuna - as long as no dolphins die in catching the tuna. The proposed changes would overturn a seven-year law banning from the American market any tuna caught by targeting dolphins in large circling nets and clear the way for tuna from 11 countries, like Mexico and Venezuela, to return to the U.S. market.
NEWS
July 26, 1999
Mmm-mmm, good! Hope you enjoyed that tasty orange roughy at your favorite seafood joint. That might have been one of your last chances to savor it. In fact, your platter could have included a healthy side helping of guilt. Orange roughy, swept up in western Pacific waters around New Zealand, is one of 90 species of edible fish that are being severely overfished and, therefore, endangered. They range from familiar fish like cod to once obscure species that have become a hit in upscale restaurants.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - They look like tiny coriander seeds. And 6,000 of them can easily fit into the bottom of a half-dozen buckets filled with seawater. But the young horseshoe crabs released into the Cape May Canal on Friday, as part of the 26th anniversary of National Estuaries Day, are the essentials of a grow-and-release program at the Rutgers Aquaculture Innovation Center here. The project, called the Horseshoe Crab Enhancement Initiative, helps boost the population of the 450-million-year-old species in the Delaware Bay - an East Coast hot spot for horseshoe crabs - and provides a baseline for further study of the ecologically critical and commercially key marine arthropods.
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NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie's administration filed a complaint Friday in federal court in an attempt to stop a seismic testing project the state argues will harm fishing industries and marine life. The action was praised by several environmental groups, which said the testing that began this week in federal waters southeast of Long Beach Island would hurt endangered whales, among other species, and would lead to oil and gas exploration and extraction. Proponents of the project, which is being conducted by Rutgers University with federal funding, say it will help scientists study sea-level rise.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - They look like tiny coriander seeds. And 6,000 of them can easily fit into the bottom of a half-dozen buckets filled with seawater. But the young horseshoe crabs released into the Cape May Canal on Friday, as part of the 26th anniversary of National Estuaries Day, are the essentials of a grow-and-release program at the Rutgers Aquaculture Innovation Center here. The project, called the Horseshoe Crab Enhancement Initiative, helps boost the population of the 450-million-year-old species in the Delaware Bay - an East Coast hot spot for horseshoe crabs - and provides a baseline for further study of the ecologically critical and commercially key marine arthropods.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a pool of more than $75 million in federal appropriations for fisheries disaster relief from Hurricane Sandy and other storm damage, at only $1.5 million, New Jersey has received a pittance compared with other regions, according to state legislators and anglers associations. Marine industry losses in both commercial and recreational fishing because of Sandy have been estimated at $121 million in New Jersey and $77 million in New York state. The two states have been told to split $3 million being allocated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service for the recovery, officials said.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
POINT PLEASANT BEACH, N.J. - Commercial fisherman Jim Lovgren has navigated some rough seas lately. First, his 70-foot trawler, Viking II, swamped in high waves and sank 80 miles off Cape May in late September. Then, on Oct. 22, Sandy took a dramatic swipe at the Fisherman's Dock Cooperative, where Lovgren is a director and about a dozen third- and fourth-generation fishermen bring their catch to be sold at markets throughout the country. The operation, which has survived plenty of ferocious hurricanes and howling nor'easters since it was established on the docks along Channel Avenue nearly 60 years ago, had never experienced anything as bad as Sandy, Lovgren said.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Rod McGuirk, Associated Press
CANBERRA, Australia - Australia has created the world's largest network of marine reserves and will restrict fishing as well as oil and gas exploration in a major step to safeguard the environment and access to food. With the expansion announced Thursday, Australia will protect 1.2 million square miles of ocean. The reserves will encompass a third of the island continent's territorial waters, which sustain more than 4,000 species of fish. Australia is surrounded by the world's third-largest ocean territory, which provides important habitat to threatened species of whales, sharks and turtles as well as spectacular corals.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2010
M Session: Pa. House Approp. Committee; N.J. Assembly Labor Comm., jobless benefit claims; Assembly Environ., effect of gulf oil spill on N.J. Shore and fishing industry. T Released: Treas. int'l money flows; Nat'l Assoc. of Home Builders' market index. Session: U.S. Senate Energy/Natural Resources Comm., solar rebates, loans. W Released for May: U.S. Labor Dept.'s Producer Price Index; Commerce's housing starts. Session: U.S. Senate Aging Comm.
NEWS
December 29, 2009 | By Steven Conn
The fish must have a lot of money and really good lobbyists. As a result, they've convinced a number of politicians that healthy fish are more important than healthy people. That's the only conclusion I can reach to explain the current response by the Great Lakes congressional delegation to the impending invasion of Asian carp. They are coming, no doubt about it, and bringing their insatiable hunger with them. They have moved up the waterways of the Mississippi Valley and are now poised to enter Lake Michigan.
NEWS
November 5, 2007 | By Andrea Kavanagh
Like small boats in an unending squall, U.S. consumers are buffeted from all sides with information about what kind of food to buy and why it's good - or bad - for them. In such a convergence of advertising, news and constant marketing, timely and accurate information is crucial. That's why it was so disturbing when a group called the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition released a report recently encouraging pregnant women to increase their consumption of fish despite the well-known risk of mercury and other contaminants commonly found in certain seafood.
NEWS
April 9, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perched on the mud flats of the Delaware Bay, this remote village, where there are more fishing boats than houses, could become ground zero for the effects of a chemical so deadly that scientists call it a weapon of mass destruction. But people in the "Weakfish Capital of the World" aren't scientists. They're fishermen. "This will just kill the fishing industry here once and for all, no question about it," said Clarence "Bunky" Higbee, whose family has owned a marina here for three generations.
NEWS
January 28, 2003 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a town where it seems just about every working adult either fishes or supports those who do. More whitefish, including cod, haddock, halibut, turbot and sole, are brought back to Peterhead's windswept port than to any other in Europe. But North Sea overfishing, and what the European Union intends to do about it, may spell ruin for this town of 20,000 that rises on the wet hills above the port, and for many others along the east coast of Scotland. A European Union directive to take effect Saturday will cut Britain's cod and haddock quota by half and limit its whitefishing fleet to 15 days at sea each month, down from more than 20. Residents of the fishing towns in the region, the center of the Scottish industry, have been reeling since the news was announced last month, complaining that the drastic limits will disproportionately affect them.
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