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Fishing Rod

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NEWS
January 14, 2001 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If fishing is your passion, then you may want to build your own fishing rod. If so, Clay Johnson is your man. "We make the best there is," said Clay Johnson, a member of Tri-State Custom Rod Builders, an organization of about 100 hobbyists from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. All but one are men. Johnson, a member of the club for 20 years, will be teaching a custom rod-building class that begins Saturday and runs for two more weekends at the Paoli Veterans of Foreign Wars Post at Grubb and Mill Road.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | For The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
On beautiful days, creeks beckon, and Danny Sadwick, 6, of Sharon Hill, responded with a fishing rod. He and his mother and sister whiled away part of the day along the Crum in Swarthmore.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Allowing Floyd Garland to work at a home for neglected and abused children was "like putting the fox in with the chickens," Assistant District Attorney Charles Ehrlich said yesterday. Erhlich said on two occasions in 1987, while Garland was supervising children at a home on Tabor Road, he sexually molested two 15-year-old boys. After describing Garland's actions as "inexcusable," Municipal Judge Arthur S. Kafrissen sentenced him to 10 to 40 years in prison. Garland, of 28th Street near Thompson, was convicted on charges of involuntary deviate sexual intercourse and corrupting the morals of a minor last July.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
His brothers were already at the pond fishing when 10-year-old Samuel Snyder gathered up his pole, hopped on his bike, and began pedaling down Lakemont Road to meet them Monday afternoon. "He was trying to catch up," said his stepfather, Steven Moskowitz. He didn't make it. As Samuel rode his bike - his fishing rod in tow - out into the intersection of Mount Pleasant Road, a motorist traveling east had no time to react or avoid hitting him, police said. Police said the boy apparently did not look before entering the intersection.
NEWS
July 27, 1987 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mildly retarded East Falls man who friends said liked to dress as a policeman drowned in the Schuylkill over the weekend, police said. The body of William Osterman, 47, of the 4000 block of Ridge Avenue, was spotted by two young boys about 4:20 p.m. yesterday. Police said Osterman, a lifelong resident of East Falls who was known in the neighborhood as "Sarge," was last seen about 7 p.m. Saturday carrying a fishing rod, a bottle of wine and a bottle of whiskey. Police said Osterman either jumped or fell from the wall along Kelly Drive at Midvale Avenue and drowned.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Alvaro Barrientos and Harold Heckle, Associated Press
PAMPLONA, Spain - The start of the annual San Fermin bull-running festival was delayed briefly on Saturday by masked men who unfurled a huge Basque flag, blocking the view of a balcony where a rocket that officially marks the beginning of the revelry is launched. Minutes before the celebrations were due to begin, several masked men were seen unfurling the flag, known as the Ikurrina, and draping it from rooftops after launching a cord across the square by using a fishing rod. Thousands of revelers, dressed in traditional white with a red handkerchief around their necks, packed the square chanting "Viva San Fermin" as the flag was removed.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | by Joe Clark Daily News Staff Writer
Bill Hechter started the old-fashioned way. A glass, a spool of thread, a telephone book, a dipsey and two hunks of wood. He's ending up with the most modern equipment bucks can buy. A computer, a high-tech job that draws, designs, measures, even spits out a color print suitable for framing. All for the sake of making - oops, crafting - a better fishing rod. Reelly. For more than half his life, the 72-year-old retiree has been crafting fishing rods. He repairs and custom designs them, too. Sometimes he makes them from scratch.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Class clown and prom king rolled into one, the country singer Brad Paisley wears many ten-gallon hats. On his hit single "Ticks," he's a wry horndog, offering a woman a flowery romp followed by a thorough inspection for parasites. "I'm Still a Guy" decries "feminized" men with "creamy, lotiony hands," even while admitting he might occasionally get caught holding his wife's purse. Songs like "She's Everything" display an unabashed romantic side, while "I'm Gonna Miss Her" kisses off a gal who has made the mistake of getting between him and his fishing rod. At Saturday's Tweeter Center show, Paisley shifted gears with the ease of a race-car driver.
NEWS
September 13, 1996 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An out-of-control car plunged into the Schuylkill off West River Drive yesterday, killing the 61-year-old driver and critically injuring a 60-year-old fisherman who had been standing on the bank. Police last night were still trying to determine why the burgundy Chevrolet Corsica jumped a concrete parking barrier about 4:25 p.m. and barreled down the muddy riverbank near the Strawberry Mansion Bridge. Authorities identified the driver as Fletcher Morris, of the 700 block of North 41st Street in West Philadelphia.
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NEWS
February 20, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT DIDN'T matter where Fran McQuade was - Florida, Jamaica, down the Shore - he invariably ran into somebody he knew. "Hey, I know that guy," he would say to his wife, Ruth, who knew that she was going to have to wait patiently while he had a sometimes lengthy conversation with the other party. Fran couldn't help it. People were just drawn to him, and wherever he went - on the job, at the ballpark, around his Levittown neighborhood - he made friends. "He had beautiful blue eyes and a beautiful smile," Ruth said.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Alvaro Barrientos and Harold Heckle, Associated Press
PAMPLONA, Spain - The start of the annual San Fermin bull-running festival was delayed briefly on Saturday by masked men who unfurled a huge Basque flag, blocking the view of a balcony where a rocket that officially marks the beginning of the revelry is launched. Minutes before the celebrations were due to begin, several masked men were seen unfurling the flag, known as the Ikurrina, and draping it from rooftops after launching a cord across the square by using a fishing rod. Thousands of revelers, dressed in traditional white with a red handkerchief around their necks, packed the square chanting "Viva San Fermin" as the flag was removed.
SPORTS
May 4, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER GIANTS linebacker Harry Carson says he's not surprised by Junior Seau's tragic death, which has been ruled a suicide. "When I heard it, I have to say in the past I would have been shocked," Carson told the New York Post. "But I'm not shocked anymore. " It's too early to tell if Seau's death is linked to postconcussion syndrome, but Carson would not be surprised if that's the case. "I knew years ago that there would come a point in time where, whether it was transitioning to the game, or there would be guys having these neurological issues, that players were going to be committing suicide," said Carson, who has spoken out about his own battle with postconcussion syndrome and admitted that he has considered suicide.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Holbrook Mohr and Shelia Byrd, Associated Press
TUNICA, Miss. - The bulging Mississippi River rolled into the fertile Mississippi Delta on Tuesday, threatening to swamp antebellum mansions, wash away shotgun shacks, and destroy fields of cotton, rice, and corn in a flood of historic proportions. The river took aim at one of the most poverty-stricken parts of the country after cresting before daybreak at Memphis just inches short of the record set in 1937. Some low-lying neighborhoods were inundated, but the city's high levees protected much of the rest of Memphis.
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Knisell, 83, of Wenonah, a former outdoors writer who built custom fishing rods, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital after suffering a massive stroke. Mr. Knisell wrote columns on fishing and hunting for the Gloucester County Times and filed weekly for Fisherman magazine. He also broadcast reports every Saturday on WSNJ-AM (1240) in Bridgeton, N.J. "For the past 28 years or so, I don't think he ever missed a program unless he was in the hospital or something was wrong," said George Moore, host of the station's Sportsman's Hotline show.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Tom Bellew narrowed his eyes at a palomino trout, a white shimmer in the dark green waters of Ridley Creek in Media yesterday. "There he is. He's just sauntering around," Bellew said. The Exelon employee, 47, and about a dozen of his Glenolden neighbors had gathered in Ridley Creek State Park to fish in the morning as trout season opened in 18 Southeastern Pennsylvania counties. The palomino, which they figured was about 21 inches long, was their Moby-Dick - pale like the white whale, though short of matching its ferocity.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Class clown and prom king rolled into one, the country singer Brad Paisley wears many ten-gallon hats. On his hit single "Ticks," he's a wry horndog, offering a woman a flowery romp followed by a thorough inspection for parasites. "I'm Still a Guy" decries "feminized" men with "creamy, lotiony hands," even while admitting he might occasionally get caught holding his wife's purse. Songs like "She's Everything" display an unabashed romantic side, while "I'm Gonna Miss Her" kisses off a gal who has made the mistake of getting between him and his fishing rod. At Saturday's Tweeter Center show, Paisley shifted gears with the ease of a race-car driver.
NEWS
January 11, 2005 | By Judy Harch
There was something to be said for keeping a clear head this New Year's Eve. I woke up bright and early, feeling chipper on the gorgeous gift of an unusually sunny and warm New Year's Day. As the Mummers gathered steam in Philadelphia and the Tournament of Roses Parade floats jockeyed for position in Pasadena, Calif., my husband and I headed to the Jersey Shore with our yellow Lab, Maggie. Each year, we try to make a few dormant-season jaunts to the Shore. Usually, it's in early spring or late fall.
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Ellen B. Cutler FOR THE INQUIRER
Ruth Sawyer's 1956 children's classic The Enchanted Schoolhouse is the story of young Brian Boru Gallagher ("named for a high King of Ireland in ancient times") who travels from County Donegal to Lobster Cove, Maine, to live with his Uncle Seumas and Aunt Delia. He brings with him a leprechaun, a magical "wee man" he has captured and contained in the brown earthenware teapot that had been his grandmother's only dowry. To my fifth-grade imagination, Ireland was filled with schoolhouses, "white and pretty, with a fuchsia growing by the door, with primroses around the doorsill" and the whistling songs of a "throstle.
SPORTS
December 17, 2001 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The best free safety in football, at least according to his coaches and teammates, wasn't sure he would ever get his first interception of the season. Brian Dawkins had been knocking the ball down on plenty of occasions, and creating havoc in the Eagles' blitzing schemes. But that first pick of the year - that took a while. It took until late in the third quarter yesterday at DeadEx Field, host to 84,936 disgruntled Washington fans and home to a team that can officially consider itself a former contender for the NFC East title.
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