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Fishing Rod

NEWS
August 16, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, and Kristin E. Holmes, FOR THE INQUIRER
A 55-year-old West Philadelphia man drowned yesterday morning while fishing at a Peco Energy Co.-owned dam that spans the Schuylkill between Norristown and Bridgeport. George Bullock lost his footing and tumbled into the river after he began tugging on his fishing rod, according to eyewitnesses. Rescue crews were called to the site at 10:43 a.m. Bullock's fishing pole, with a catfish on its hook, was found about 12:30 p.m. Bullock's body was not recovered until 2:10 p.m., after a 100-member crew of fire, rescue, police and diving units from Norristown, Telford, North Penn and Plymouth worked almost three hours to retrieve it from the dam's "boil," the turbulent water just beneath the dam. Bullock had arrived at the popular fishing spot with friends Robert Quinn and Robert Walker, both of Philadelphia, earlier that morning.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A MAN'S MAN Are you a real man? If you are, Men's Health magazine says, you should have the following 25 things: A set of good-quality tools; a watch with hands; dumbbells; a car you love to drive; the Rand McNally Road Atlas; a week's worth of underwear with no holes in them ("essential for bachelors"); a pair of dress shoes that cost more than you wanted to spend; a serious first-aid kit; binoculars, the smaller the better; a well-maintained bike; a blender; a packable raincoat; a rugged two-suiter garment bag; the Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cookbook; a genuine Swiss army knife; a non-embarrassing hat; a dark-blue suit; a fishing rod; an answering machine ("for when you go on fishing trips")
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
NEXT TIME YOU GO FISHING DON'T FORGET THE CODE BOOK Just when you thought you'd heard it all, along comes news of fish being raised with "bar codes" in their ears. Researchers in Everett, Wash., say they've found a way to raise fish that carry distinctive "bar-code" patterns in the bones of their ears, providing an identification system for a fish's entire lifetime. The technique will be used to track fish populations and conduct other environmental research. Who knows.
SPORTS
February 20, 1995 | Compiled from Daily News wire reports
The managers and coaches will tell you they don't want to be at spring training if it means working with replacement players. But unlike Detroit's Sparky Anderson, most of them are sucking it up. If we didn't know any better, we might even think that some of them are enjoying themselves. Take this story out of Mesa, Ariz., where some California Angels coaches had a good laugh at the expense of replacement catcher Joel Smith. First, catching instructor Bill Lachemann asked Smith to catch a few fastballs from a pitching machine.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush yesterday welcomed the new year here with a friendly little bass-fishing competition with his wife and an ambitious New Year's resolution - world peace. Barbara Bush's resolution for 1990 was a little more modest, though perhaps as elusive. "No more desserts," she said. "Until tonight. " Bush said his resolution for the new year was "peace, world peace. " The Bushes visited Alabama as they ended a six-day Christmas holiday in Texas, and Barbara Bush revealed the truth about their madcap lifestyle: They were in bed by 9 p.m. on New Year's Eve in Houston after a candelit take-out Chinese dinner featuring no champagne.
NEWS
June 30, 1986 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
More than 20 infrequent churchgoers offered no excuse yesterday morning as they entered the Boehms Reformed United Church of Christ in Blue Bell to attend the church's service. Having received special invitations from the Rev. Deborah R. Clemens, Boehms' pastor, members whose attendence records have been somewhat less than perfect were confronted in the vestibule by a variety of items that answered virtually every excuse one could have for not attending church. There was a cot for those who like to sleep in on Sunday mornings, a cardboard box containing sand and a pail for those who would rather be at the shore, live plants for those who say they find God in nature rather than in a church, a hardhat for those who say the roof would fall in should they ever return to church, frozen dinners for those who need a cooked meal at noon, cotton for the ears of those who say the pastor speaks too loudly and headphones for those who say she speaks too softly, a blanket for those who find church too cold and a fan for those who find it too hot, and a fishing pole for those who would rather be casting their lines on Sunday mornings.
SPORTS
May 4, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER GIANTS linebacker Harry Carson says he's not surprised by Junior Seau's tragic death, which has been ruled a suicide. "When I heard it, I have to say in the past I would have been shocked," Carson told the New York Post. "But I'm not shocked anymore. " It's too early to tell if Seau's death is linked to postconcussion syndrome, but Carson would not be surprised if that's the case. "I knew years ago that there would come a point in time where, whether it was transitioning to the game, or there would be guys having these neurological issues, that players were going to be committing suicide," said Carson, who has spoken out about his own battle with postconcussion syndrome and admitted that he has considered suicide.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When cousins Steven Kapral and Michael Worthington dipped their fishing lines into the Delaware last weekend, the Bensalem boys expected to snag nothing more than the usual batch of seaweed or the occasional bass or catfish that swims past the wobbly docks of their families' riverfront home. Certainly, they didn't expect to snare the footlong, 2 1/2-pound, red-bellied piranha that took their bait - literally. The fish, a sharp-toothed South American species, is so rare in the chilled waters of the Delaware that local marine officials do not study them and pet stores rarely stock them bigger than a few inches.
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Ellen B. Cutler FOR THE INQUIRER
Ruth Sawyer's 1956 children's classic The Enchanted Schoolhouse is the story of young Brian Boru Gallagher ("named for a high King of Ireland in ancient times") who travels from County Donegal to Lobster Cove, Maine, to live with his Uncle Seumas and Aunt Delia. He brings with him a leprechaun, a magical "wee man" he has captured and contained in the brown earthenware teapot that had been his grandmother's only dowry. To my fifth-grade imagination, Ireland was filled with schoolhouses, "white and pretty, with a fuchsia growing by the door, with primroses around the doorsill" and the whistling songs of a "throstle.
NEWS
January 11, 2005 | By Judy Harch
There was something to be said for keeping a clear head this New Year's Eve. I woke up bright and early, feeling chipper on the gorgeous gift of an unusually sunny and warm New Year's Day. As the Mummers gathered steam in Philadelphia and the Tournament of Roses Parade floats jockeyed for position in Pasadena, Calif., my husband and I headed to the Jersey Shore with our yellow Lab, Maggie. Each year, we try to make a few dormant-season jaunts to the Shore. Usually, it's in early spring or late fall.
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