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Fishing Rod

NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Knisell, 83, of Wenonah, a former outdoors writer who built custom fishing rods, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital after suffering a massive stroke. Mr. Knisell wrote columns on fishing and hunting for the Gloucester County Times and filed weekly for Fisherman magazine. He also broadcast reports every Saturday on WSNJ-AM (1240) in Bridgeton, N.J. "For the past 28 years or so, I don't think he ever missed a program unless he was in the hospital or something was wrong," said George Moore, host of the station's Sportsman's Hotline show.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Tom Bellew narrowed his eyes at a palomino trout, a white shimmer in the dark green waters of Ridley Creek in Media yesterday. "There he is. He's just sauntering around," Bellew said. The Exelon employee, 47, and about a dozen of his Glenolden neighbors had gathered in Ridley Creek State Park to fish in the morning as trout season opened in 18 Southeastern Pennsylvania counties. The palomino, which they figured was about 21 inches long, was their Moby-Dick - pale like the white whale, though short of matching its ferocity.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inventor John F. Bennett's droopy-ended baseball bat was easy to heft and could turbocharge a hit, but it was taken for a cheater by many. And shoppers thought his cookware was defective. The comfortable down- turned handles on pots and pans looked broken and did not sell, according to the manufacturer. The bat, the cookware and several other products using Bennett's patented bent grips bombed in the 1980s. But both Bennett and the elusive science called ergonomics - making things and people work better together - are alive and kicking in the 1990s.
LIVING
June 11, 1993 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the hill to Henryville 'Tis oft' the fisherman's cry, For I'll catch a fourteen-incher With an artificial fly! - Angling author Henry Van Dyke A river may run through Montana, but Pennsylvania is the cradle of fly fishing in America, with some of the most legendary trout streams in the country still drawing sportsmen to their pools and swift waters. There's an architectural legacy as well in the fly-fishing clubs that were formed in the early 1900s and that still maintain lodges and clubhouses with the distinctly simple and rural character of the early Poconos.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Gov. Christie ran a bit late from his Wednesday appearance in New Hampshire to cut the new store's ribbon, but that didn't discourage the massive crowd that wanted to be among the first to enter the new Bass Pro Shops Outpost, the latest element in this city's revitalization efforts. As Christie finally hit the stage 20 minutes late, at 6:20 p.m., he endured loud boos from Eagles fans because of his affinity for the Dallas Cowboys. To appease them, he called former Eagles running back Brian Westbrook - standing behind him onstage, along with Miss New Jersey 2014, the current Miss America, and NASCAR driver Tony Stewart - to come forward.
NEWS
April 6, 2015
ISSUE | INCLUSION Pa. must enact LGBT safeguards The passage of a so-called religious freedom law in Indiana presents Pennsylvania lawmakers with a unique opportunity to proclaim full human rights for all ("Inviting bigotry," April 2). Now is the time for Harrisburg to enact a comprehensive antidiscrimination law that ensures legal protection for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community. As a religious leader, my faith calls me to affirm the inherent worth and dignity of all people.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | By Kevin Hutt
Whatever happened to good old-fashioned customer service? I needed to make a quick 9:15 p.m. diaper run so we could put our son to bed. I went to a large drugstore that was closing at 9:30. Taking the diapers from the shelf, I was shocked to hear a voice from the next aisle: "These [expletive deleted] customers keep messing up the [expletive deleted] shelves I spend all day fixing. " The woman spewing the offensive trash was attractive and well kept, someone who otherwise presented herself very well.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
BOY'S CATCH IS ENOUGH TO MAKE ONE'S FLESH CRAWL A Maryland boy testing his new fishing rod landed an unexpected catch: an 11-inch piranha, the South American flesh-eating fish. Since 8-year-old Michael McManus caught the fish, Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials have received five other unconfirmed reports of piranhas in the 5-acre Prince George's County pond. DNR spokesman John Verrico suspects that Michael's catch was a discarded aquarium pet. Swimming in the pond is prohibited.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wesley Taylor, 75, a retired aeronautical engineer who formerly owned and operated a hardware store in Wayne, died Monday at Bryn Mawr Rehab in Malvern. He had lived near Barto, Berks County, since 1988. Before that, Mr. Taylor lived in Wayne for 35 years. After retiring in 1973 from the Naval Air Propulsion Center in Trenton, he was proprietor of the Gateway Hardware store in Wayne for nine years. After selling Gateway in 1983, for the next five years he ran a concession stand, Hardware Basics, at the Downingtown Farmers Market.
SPORTS
September 21, 2012
It took a lot of work, but the Orioles kept their extra-inning streak alive very early Wednesday morning. The O's won their 14th straight extra-inning game when pinch-hitter Taylor Teagarden hit an RBI single in the 18th inning to beat Seattle, 4-2. It's the longest such streak since the 1949 Indians won 19 in a row. Anyone in Baltimore who stayed awake to the very end had a difficult time at work Wednesday: It was a few minutes before 4...
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