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Fishtown

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NEWS
November 13, 2001
I was intrigued by Monica Yant Kinney's column "City line serves as dividing line" (Inquirer, Nov. 6) but also confused by the statement, "The droves fleeing Fishtown for Flourtown... " While I know Kinney probably used this as a metaphor for urban flight to the suburbs, I can't imagine a more inaccurate one. Fishtown is probably one of the strongest neighborhoods in the city. It did not experience "white flight" in the 1950s, and it hasn't to this day. I am not talking about it being one of the strongest Philadelphia neighborhoods, but one of the strongest in America.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
By Donna Cooper In his new book, Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 , Charles Murray uses Fishtown as a prototypical white, lower-class community in decline. Philadelphians know Fishtown as one of a few city neighborhoods attracting urban hipsters and young families. Where Sanka was once considered gourmet, La Colombe is now widely sold. I should know; I've lived in Fishtown for 27 years. An earlier book that Murray cowrote, The Bell Curve , was roundly criticized for its flawed conclusion that blacks are on average less intelligent than whites.
NEWS
August 13, 2003
I'VE JUST READ one of the most positive, well-written Daily News letters of all time: "A Celebration of Fishtown " (Aug. 7). I couldn't agree with Mr. Kilpatrick more. Do I live in Fishtown? No, not yet. My family is moving there at the end of the month, and we made our decision based on many of the points this neighborhood son brings up. We knew for years that Fishtown was a solid, family-oriented, working-class neighborhood with quality people. We now live in Fairmount, another great city neighborhood whose residents have many friends and family in Fishtown.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
For jewelry artisan Sarah Lewis, this month is a time for celebration. Celebration, yes. Easy breathing, no. She opened her boutique in Fishtown, Philadelphia's latest neighborhood-on-a-comeback, on May 6, 2011. Experts say five years in business is needed before survival can be declared for small start-ups. Lewis's smile gave way to a slightly pained expression when she was asked last week about her total investment to bring Adorn Boutique to life at 1314 Frankford Ave. There's a mortgage, and the cost of transforming the former welding shop into an inviting retail outpost.
NEWS
March 27, 2013
By A.J. Thomson Call it a Wynn-win for Philadelphia. The 300-room casino-hotel for Philadelphia proposed by Steve Wynn would sit about five blocks from my home in Fishtown, and extend up into lower Port Richmond. It should be the only site up for discussion. Wynn, chief executive of Wynn Resorts Ltd., which has similar operations in Las Vegas and Macau, is intent on building a destination resort on this 60-acre site, which extends along North Beach Street from Palmer to Cumberland Streets.
REAL_ESTATE
August 17, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Drexel-educated professional engineer Lawrence McKnight was working on Citizens Bank Park in 2003 as a member of the Pennoni Associates staff when he ventured to a home construction site nearby. That was Westrum Development Co.'s Reserve at Packer Park, which was then in the third phase and asking for and getting in the upper $300,000s to low $400,000s. Intrigued, McKnight joined Westrum, and spent the next eight or nine years with the company, "gaining a lot of knowledge about residential building," he said.
REAL_ESTATE
July 6, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
There may be no way to hold back the tide of gentrification in such neighborhoods as Fishtown, but Sandy Salzman is trying to find ways to keep it from washing away moderate-income residents. Salzman is executive director of New Kensington Community Development Corp., and the Awesometown townhouse project is its first foray into mixed affordable housing: 10 units selling at the market rate of about $400,000, and four subsidized by NKCDC to sell for half that, with the "winners" picked by lottery.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The entrance to what's promised to be Philadelphia's hottest music club come fall is a gravel lot under an I-95 overpass. Now, it's just an abandoned metal factory in Fishtown - windows long blown out, covered in graffiti. But by fall, developers promise, it will be home to the Fillmore, a 2,500-seat music hall that promoter Live Nation aims to fill with big-name talent, as well as the Foundry, a more intimate venue with room for 450 aimed at local bands and up-and-coming talent, and a lounge.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Charles Murray
Coming Apart, the book I published a few months ago, tracks the cultural divergences in America's classes from 1960 to 2010, focusing on whites as a way of getting people to understand that the problems I describe aren't driven by minorities. I used Belmont, an affluent Boston suburb, as my label for the white upper middle class, and Fishtown, referring to Philadelphia's own Fishtown, one of the oldest white working-class communities in America, as my label for the white working class.
NEWS
September 30, 1994 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A crowd of angry Fishtown residents booed Mayor Rendell last night as he left an ecumenical prayer service intended to promote racial tolerance in the neighborhood. "You're not my mayor," several shouted at Rendell as he finished addressing the audience inside the East Baptist Church. Many complained that neither Rendell nor Councilman Joe Vignola had visited the neighborhood to hear residents' complaints about increasing crime and violence. About 100 residents had gathered spontaneously outside the church - about the same number as those who were attending the service inside - after word spread that Fishtown was being bad-mouthed as racist.
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REAL_ESTATE
August 17, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Drexel-educated professional engineer Lawrence McKnight was working on Citizens Bank Park in 2003 as a member of the Pennoni Associates staff when he ventured to a home construction site nearby. That was Westrum Development Co.'s Reserve at Packer Park, which was then in the third phase and asking for and getting in the upper $300,000s to low $400,000s. Intrigued, McKnight joined Westrum, and spent the next eight or nine years with the company, "gaining a lot of knowledge about residential building," he said.
REAL_ESTATE
July 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Nino Cutrufello and Marcus Toconita, buddies since their Malvern Prep days in the early 1990s, worked for national builders during the housing-boom years. In 2007, they decided to strike out on their own as Callahan Ward Cos. (their mothers' maiden names) and begin building the upscale housing they saw was in demand in the emerging Philadelphia neighborhoods of Northern Liberties and Fishtown. It was August 2007, to be exact - just as the real estate bubble burst. "We timed the market perfectly," Cutrufello, a Havertown native, said recently, laughing.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene Ross crossed the finish line at his last New York City Marathon when he was 70. Mr. Ross completed the 75-mile, one-day version of his last bicycling event - the Bike MS: City to Shore Ride, a fund-raiser for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society - when he was 84. "He was a better man than I was," said his wife, Christine, who did not compete in either event. "He was not fast," in running or biking, she said, "but he had endurance. " Such effort, she said, "didn't kill him. It made him live until he was 90. " On Sunday, July 19, Mr. Ross died of liver cancer at his home in Ocean City.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
In a decision that will protect Fishtown's St. Laurentius Roman Catholic Church from demolition - at least temporarily - the Philadelphia Historical Commission voted overwhelmingly Friday to grant the 19th-century building historic status. Cheers erupted after the vote, which followed a lengthy and emotional hearing that pitted parishioners, neighborhood residents, preservationists, several Polish heritage groups, and even Poland's honorary consul against the church hierarchy. Because St. Laurentius is Philadelphia's oldest church built by Polish immigrants, the community considers it a cultural touchstone.
REAL_ESTATE
July 6, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
There may be no way to hold back the tide of gentrification in such neighborhoods as Fishtown, but Sandy Salzman is trying to find ways to keep it from washing away moderate-income residents. Salzman is executive director of New Kensington Community Development Corp., and the Awesometown townhouse project is its first foray into mixed affordable housing: 10 units selling at the market rate of about $400,000, and four subsidized by NKCDC to sell for half that, with the "winners" picked by lottery.
REAL_ESTATE
June 29, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
There was a time, not very long ago, when the number of unsubsidized, market-rate residential construction projects within the Philadelphia city limits could be counted on one hand. Now, you need a scorecard to keep track, and even that list might need to be updated daily. Noah Ostroff, of Keller Williams Real Estate in Center City, said that, typically, when he gets a call from someone looking to buy a property in the city, it is for new construction. "I don't have many people looking for traditional - what we call 'homes with character,' " he said.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Paul Kimport and William Reed's bars, beginning with Standard Tap, have a long history of serving far more ambitious food than the usual bar fare. That continues at their pioneering Fishtown pub, Johnny Brenda's, where current chef, Adam Diltz, is strutting both seasonality and well-honed technique. I loved the delicacy of his crisped squash blossoms stuffed with sweet ricotta and mint. But Diltz's serious culinary training (Boston's No. 9 Park, Blackberry Farm in Tennessee, and Chicago's Everest)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There's a simple reason so many of Philadelphia's great religious buildings have been falling to the wrecking ball: Nobody is left to love them anymore. That's not the case with St. Laurentius Roman Catholic Church in Fishtown, built in 1882 with nickels and dimes collected by the neighborhood's Polish community. When the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced in March that it planned to demolish the brownstone church at Berks and Memphis Streets - presumably to sell off the land for house lots - its partisans rushed to the virtual barricades to hold off the wrecking crew.
FOOD
June 5, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The neon-lit arrival of Joe's Steaks in Fishtown and the suddenly retro-polished diner corner of Frankford and Girard is a major development in the world of Philadelphia cheesesteaks. That's because owner Joseph Groh has long maintained his home base in Torresdale as one of the city's finest examples of what a classic steak made with high-quality, freshly sliced, cooked-to-order rib eye can be. He's weathered the ire of some old-timers who still resent his changing the name it had since 1949 (Chink's)
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