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Fishtown

FOOD
June 7, 2013
To call Pizzeria Beddia hot is an understatement. This tiny Fishtown corner takeout is as inconvenient as possible - open only Wednesday through Saturday, with a limited cash-only menu and no phone. But I'd endure the hour-plus wait again because Joe Beddia puts so much love into every crispy New York-style round. From the locally sourced ingredients to his meticulously fermented dough, he practically sends each one into the oven with a goodbye kiss. But things get genuinely hot with the Arrabiata, an "angry" pizza whose thick Jersey tomato sauce is spiked with so many chiles, both pickled serranos and thinly shaved fresh Thai peppers, that it's bound to become Philly's new object of spicy desire.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AS SOON AS the new, million-dollar Poquessing Creek Trail opened in the Far Northeast this winter, Jack McCarthy was out hiking it with his granddaughter, Gia McCusker, 8. "The trail is a bucolic, serene place to go from Parkwood, where I live," McCarthy said. "Parkwood is all rowhouses," he said. "I can walk five minutes and be on this trail that leads through this nice woods and along this beautiful stream. "And it connects to Benjamin Rush State Park's trails," McCarthy said, "so you can basically walk or bike from Parkwood all the way to the state park.
SPORTS
January 5, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Surrounded by Fishtown's redbrick sea, Palmer Cemetery is an eerie urban island. Neighbors of the 250-year-old burial grounds insist spirits of the Revolutionary and Civil War veterans interred there sometimes prowl its weathered headstones and foreboding maples. Meanwhile, just a block away, another more tangible neighborhood ghost is stirring to life. At the cramped corner of Tulip and Palmer Streets, a long-abandoned Industrial Age building that, in terms of its baseball pedigree, may now be the most significant structure in Philadelphia is being converted into 30 apartments.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. The year was 1992; the place, Northern Liberties. The median price of a house, mostly the two- and three-story brick row variety, was $26,600. A northward trek from Old City was underway - artists first, then restaurants and other businesses looking for space and cheap rents. There was some building of what one neighborhood activist called "homes of the future" - listed at $200,000 in a city in which the median price was struggling to top $60,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Stand at the corner of Ninth and Berks Streets in North Philadelphia and you can practically feel the tidal wave of gentrification bearing down from both directions. One block west, the twin concrete towers of Temple University's Anderson Hall loom up like a medieval gate. Walk a few blocks east and you're enveloped in the hipster precincts of Fishtown. But the parts in between have been forsaken for so long that it's hard to recall what this rowhouse neighborhood was like in its prime.
NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Burns Sr., 67, a longtime funeral director, died Monday, Sept. 9, of pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Northeast Philadelphia. Mr. Burns was a director and owner of Burns Funeral Home, which has branches in Fishtown, Northeast Philadelphia, and Levittown. The firm was founded in 1939 by his parents, Martin J. Burns Sr. and the former Grace R. McNeill. He worked for 40 years in the family business, patiently tending to the area's bereaved families. "I loved the business.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fran Blanche took one look at the curvaceous 1960s Westinghouse radio and made her diagnosis. "I can tell you right now, it's fixable," she said as she pried the plastic housing apart for a closer look. Greta Alexander, of Northern Liberties, was relieved. She had been trying to get it working for a while. But everyone told her to just get a new one. "But that's not the point," she said. Lost causes were welcome at the Philly Fixers Guild's third Repair Fair, held Saturday at Memphis Street Academy in Port Richmond.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / J. KYLE KEENER
AT GIRARD AND BERKS, Vickie Williams and son Mike, 3, stop to chat with a neighbor, Angelo Vassios, while their transportation takes five. Williams, who boards her gray Arabian, TC, in a nearby stable, occasionally rides it in her Philadelphia neighborhood. Vassios is the owner of the Girard Restaurant at Girard Avenue and Berks Street in Fishtown.
NEWS
July 30, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally and Max Stendahl INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
David W. Sale Jr., the 22-year-old killed outside a Phillies game Saturday, had worked for a North Wales chemical company for a year and was a "good employee and friend of many people," the company says. This weekend, the friends who remembered Sale as cheery and hard-partying will gather to bury him at a Souderton church. "I'm never going to find anyone even close to him as a friend," said Dan Curran, 22, of Lansdale, who had Phillies season tickets with Sale. The two, friends from their North Penn High School days, used to take road trips to Pittsburgh, attend country-music concerts, and share other adventures.
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