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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The sunburned cheeks/oily face combo you've been sporting for the last few weeks was the first sign. Then that frizzy mane of bleached blond hair or those poufy, two-strand twists ruined vacation selfies. Finally, you experienced a total mascara meltdown. The diagnosis: midsummer beauty blues. No worries. We can help you cool down and stay pretty with these keep-it-flawless-and-fresh tips that boast the latest in primers - as in, made from Greek yogurt - Vitamin C-infused eye creams, aromatherapy facial mists, and SPF-tinted moisturizers.
FOOD
June 7, 2013
To call Pizzeria Beddia hot is an understatement. This tiny Fishtown corner takeout is as inconvenient as possible - open only Wednesday through Saturday, with a limited cash-only menu and no phone. But I'd endure the hour-plus wait again because Joe Beddia puts so much love into every crispy New York-style round. From the locally sourced ingredients to his meticulously fermented dough, he practically sends each one into the oven with a goodbye kiss. But things get genuinely hot with the Arrabiata, an "angry" pizza whose thick Jersey tomato sauce is spiked with so many chiles, both pickled serranos and thinly shaved fresh Thai peppers, that it's bound to become Philly's new object of spicy desire.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are looking for surveillance photos and potential witnesses in the death of a 32-year-old man, shot in the chest early Sunday morning near Fourth and Lombard Streets in Society Hill. Michael G. Hagan Jr., an information-technology consultant who grew up in Pennsauken and moved to the city's Fishtown neighborhood several years ago, was an apparent robbery victim. Family members said Hagan had been out Saturday night on the Delaware River waterfront with two old friends from Pennsauken, a schoolteacher and a Peace Corps volunteer.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph F. Spross, 83, a lifelong Fishtown resident who fought in the Korean War, died Friday, June 14, at his home. Mr. Spross, known to many in his neighborhood for the care he took in cleaning and maintaining the 300 block of East Thompson Street, where he lived, died of a heart attack as he was organizing trash bins for pickup that day. "Everybody in the neighborhood will miss him," said son Chris. Mr. Spross served in the Army during the Korean War, then returned to Fishtown and went to work on the bottling line for the Gruber's soda company in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine abandoned storefronts with crumbling facades on an empty downtown street suddenly springing back to life with avant-garde art galleries, boutiques with bright vintage clothing, and the aroma of freshly brewed espresso. It isn't hard to do - not when it has happened in recent years to formerly gritty neighborhoods such as Philadelphia's Fishtown, Brooklyn's Williamsburg, and dozens of other reclaimed city streetscapes from coast to coast. But could such a social and cultural beachhead ever take hold in Chester - the now-deindustrialized Delaware County river city of 34,000 that had 23 homicides last year and has some of the most entrenched pockets of poverty on the Eastern seaboard?
NEWS
June 1, 2006 | By Richard Levins and A.J. Thomson
For the last few years, Fishtown residents have dealt with increased speculation about slots parlors being located a few blocks from their homes. While it is possible that none of these locations will be chosen by the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board, the people of Fishtown and other communities are looking at ways to minimize the impact any development would have on our neighborhoods, streets and families. Traffic concerns have dominated almost every public forum in which slots parlors have been discussed, and developers have attempted to allay our fears with studies that discount the impact that these gambling venues will have on our small, one-way streets.
NEWS
April 23, 2011 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Leisenring was 26, a German immigrant living alone in Fishtown, working as a blacksmith, when President Abraham Lincoln issued a call for volunteers to defend the nation's capitol. Virginia had just seceded from the union. Leisenring boarded a train at Broad Street and Washington Avenue with 1,200 others on April 19, 1861. Lacking both uniforms and arms, the regiment made it only to Baltimore's President Street Station, where a mob of secessionists attacked its train. Leisenring, stabbed in the back and side, became the first casualty of the Civil War from Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 22, 2008
WHEN I FIRST heard that the Nutter administration would be cutting certain public libraries, I automatically knew the ones in the African-American communities would be targeted first (exception of the Fishtown branch). Mayor Nutter clearly understands the consequences behind challenging the Philadelphia Eagles' multibillion-dollar football stadium, which owes the city $8 million, or targeting the Mummers Parade, which are both white-folks recreational establishments. But because this mayor has developed a slave-master relationship with the white community in this city, his tenure will forever be in a form of psychosocial obedient debt to them for electing him. Unfortunately, resulting in the cutting of urban libraries where young African-American children go to access resources is no concern to this psychologically trained "Happy Negro" mayor.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NOT MANY PEOPLE can go shopping and emerge from the store with a cart full of goods having either spent only a few cents or with the store actually owing them money. Marge McDermott could. At least, that was the story she told. She was a fanatic coupon-clipper, and by the time she finished delivering her coupons to the cashiers, her bill was negligible, or nonexistent. And Marge loved it. She enjoyed shopping so much that she was at two stores in Port Richmond the day before she died Saturday at age 92. She lived in Fishtown.
NEWS
June 28, 1997 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
In Philadelphia, it's been demonstrated that you can take the boy out a River Ward, but you can't take the River Ward out of the boy, no matter what his biological age. Which is why River Ward Doco - now Doco of the Daily News - was assigned this story. Three of Philadelphia's most colorful River Wards are linked like sausages, better known as Fishtown, Port Richmond and Kensington. Each has its own personality, but they're more alike than not, because their rowhouse character was shaped by the early industrialization, when Philadelphia was the workshop to the world.
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