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NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NOT MANY PEOPLE can go shopping and emerge from the store with a cart full of goods having either spent only a few cents or with the store actually owing them money. Marge McDermott could. At least, that was the story she told. She was a fanatic coupon-clipper, and by the time she finished delivering her coupons to the cashiers, her bill was negligible, or nonexistent. And Marge loved it. She enjoyed shopping so much that she was at two stores in Port Richmond the day before she died Saturday at age 92. She lived in Fishtown.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph F. Spross, 83, a lifelong Fishtown resident who fought in the Korean War, died Friday, June 14, at his home. Mr. Spross, known to many in his neighborhood for the care he took in cleaning and maintaining the 300 block of East Thompson Street, where he lived, died of a heart attack as he was organizing trash bins for pickup that day. "Everybody in the neighborhood will miss him," said son Chris. Mr. Spross served in the Army during the Korean War, then returned to Fishtown and went to work on the bottling line for the Gruber's soda company in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
TRAVEL THE WORLD, and it's hard not to trip over the many monuments and museums commemorating war and strife. But John Connors wants to know: Where are the tributes to famous friendships? Connors is leading the charge to create a museum near Penn Treaty Park in Fishtown to honor the peace treaty William Penn made with Native Americans there in 1682. Although artists, politicians and preservationists have celebrated the historic pact made under a towering elm tree, it remains one of the most pivotal American moments that lacks a dedicated museum, Connors said.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
During the red-hot real estate boom of a few years back, flipping was big sport in many parts of the country but not particularly popular in the Philadelphia region. Times change, bubbles burst, and the game of buying and selling adjusts accordingly. These days, with the market improving and prices at pre-boom levels or less, flipping single-family homes is becoming more common in those city neighborhoods and area towns where investors see the opportunity to make quick money. Hip, desirable neighborhoods such as Northern Liberties, Fishtown, and Passyunk Square have become targets for flipping.
NEWS
June 1, 2006 | By Richard Levins and A.J. Thomson
For the last few years, Fishtown residents have dealt with increased speculation about slots parlors being located a few blocks from their homes. While it is possible that none of these locations will be chosen by the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board, the people of Fishtown and other communities are looking at ways to minimize the impact any development would have on our neighborhoods, streets and families. Traffic concerns have dominated almost every public forum in which slots parlors have been discussed, and developers have attempted to allay our fears with studies that discount the impact that these gambling venues will have on our small, one-way streets.
NEWS
April 23, 2011 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Leisenring was 26, a German immigrant living alone in Fishtown, working as a blacksmith, when President Abraham Lincoln issued a call for volunteers to defend the nation's capitol. Virginia had just seceded from the union. Leisenring boarded a train at Broad Street and Washington Avenue with 1,200 others on April 19, 1861. Lacking both uniforms and arms, the regiment made it only to Baltimore's President Street Station, where a mob of secessionists attacked its train. Leisenring, stabbed in the back and side, became the first casualty of the Civil War from Pennsylvania.
FOOD
September 26, 2014
Puebla-born chef Adan Trinidad knows how to cook authentic Mexican, a fact I can taste, however ironically, in the family recipe for rich, dark mole sauce that glazes his meatballs sandwiched between Asian steamed buns at Sancho Pistola's. Then again, that's what has always made Trinidad's work so tasty during his creative modern riffs on Mexican flavors at Jose Pistola's, and now its Fishtown sibling, Sancho Pistola's. The hipster factor, though, is significantly stronger on Girard Avenue, which means the need for a serious vegetarian option.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are looking for surveillance photos and potential witnesses in the death of a 32-year-old man, shot in the chest early Sunday morning near Fourth and Lombard Streets in Society Hill. Michael G. Hagan Jr., an information-technology consultant who grew up in Pennsauken and moved to the city's Fishtown neighborhood several years ago, was an apparent robbery victim. Family members said Hagan had been out Saturday night on the Delaware River waterfront with two old friends from Pennsauken, a schoolteacher and a Peace Corps volunteer.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Residential garages in Philadelphia have long been both the envy of neighbors (a designated parking spot!) and the bane of urban-planning types (they're block-killers that disrupt the streetscape!). Lately, though, ambitious home buyers are seeing street-front garages as something different: opportunities. Across Philadelphia's developing neighborhoods, creative individuals with reverence for the city's industrial past and willingness to embark on expansive remodeling work are transforming former garages - often priced at a fraction of finished residences - into homes with loftlike living areas, custom workspaces, and, yes, even a parking space or two. Jennie Shanker, 47, a Fishtown-based sculptor, converted a 150-year-old carriage house-turned-machinist's garage into her workshop and home about nine years ago. "It was a complete and total shell - and in a way, that was the beauty of it," Shanker said.
NEWS
December 22, 2008
WHEN I FIRST heard that the Nutter administration would be cutting certain public libraries, I automatically knew the ones in the African-American communities would be targeted first (exception of the Fishtown branch). Mayor Nutter clearly understands the consequences behind challenging the Philadelphia Eagles' multibillion-dollar football stadium, which owes the city $8 million, or targeting the Mummers Parade, which are both white-folks recreational establishments. But because this mayor has developed a slave-master relationship with the white community in this city, his tenure will forever be in a form of psychosocial obedient debt to them for electing him. Unfortunately, resulting in the cutting of urban libraries where young African-American children go to access resources is no concern to this psychologically trained "Happy Negro" mayor.
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