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Flag Day

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NEWS
June 18, 1992 | For The Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
In North Coventry Township, Humphrys Flag Co. of Pottstown unfurled the world's biggest flag on Sunday, Flag Day. Thomas "Ski" Demsky of Long Beach, Calif., ordered the "Superflag," specifying that it be American-made. He plans to tour the country with it.
NEWS
June 15, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
In the Vietnam War, 58,022 U.S. soldiers were killed, taken prisoner or listed as missing in action. Yesterday, Delaware Valley Vietnam Veterans honored those soldiers on Flag Day with a flag for each soldier - 58,022 one- foot flags. Volunteers planted the flags - some red, white and blue American flags, others plain black to designate those still missing in action - into the hard, clay soil at Mill Creek Valley Park at Silver Lake, near Bristol in Bucks County. They followed the same dimensions - a 500-foot-long wedge - as the Vietnam Memorial in Washington.
NEWS
June 15, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
On the American flag's 219th birthday, Amber Wright, 9, watches festivities at Independence National Historical Park. Wright, of Monroe, Wis., and others in the crowd got a chance to sink their teeth into something else red, white and blue yesterday - a giant cake depicting the 50-star version of the flag.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flag Day is a big day for Philadelphia flag makers. It's big enough that they build their year around it. It's the causative factor for the biggest bulge in their production schedules. Because Philadelphia is considered the flag capital of the nation, that makes June 14 a very important day. But not so for the other half of the industry, the flagpole makers and the steeplejacks who maintain the poles. You can take Memorial Day, Flag Day, the Fourth of July and Labor Day, lump them all together, and they won't generate nearly as much flag business as the fall reopening of school, according to Frank Atkinson Jr. Atkinson, who at 60 bills himself as the country's oldest steeplejack, said his busy season started about Sept.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | By Sara M. Lomax, Special to The Inquirer
As U.S. Rep. Dick Schulze unfolded the crisp, clean United States flags, he commended the Smith and Authier families of the Main Line for their strength and courage during Operation Desert Storm, in which their loved ones served. "The families usually give up more than those (who serve)," said Schulze, a Republican who represents the Fifth District. "So we thought it would be appropriate to give each of those families a flag. " Both flags had flown over the Capitol in Washington and were presented to the families Friday at Schulze's Paoli office as a symbol of patriotic appreciation.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | By Jada S. Gallagher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For 16-year-old Andrew Kerr, Flag Day is almost bigger than Christmas. That's the time of year he heads to Yeadon with his family and his mellophone - an instrument similar to the French horn - to pay tribute not only to the Stars and Stripes but to the man credited with founding the national holiday. His great-grandfather, William T. Kerr. Kerr, who resided in Yeadon most of his life, led a 60-year campaign to make Flag Day a national holiday. In 1949, his efforts finally paid off when President Harry S. Truman signed the bill into law with Kerr at his side.
NEWS
June 12, 2009
MY WIFE bought a new American flag. It looks so sharp flying above the front porch, sandwiched between the dogwood and red maple, with a giant evergreen in the background. Our old flag had seen better days, flip-flopping in the wind and becoming torn, tattered and tangled on the porch pole. This new flag means more to me than a new car because of what it represents. You can't buy courage and bravery, hope and purity, reverence to God, loyalty, justice, power and ambition.
SPORTS
September 18, 2000 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Generally, you left scratching your head. Sometimes the calls seemed wrong. Others, the plays were not so bright. Unquestionably, the whistles and flags flew yesterday with an alarming frequency. The Eagles incurred 12 penalties for 115 yards, by far the most penalties and yards suffered since Andy Reid became head coach last season. It is the most penalties and yards since they took 15 for 140 in Arizona on Nov. 2, 1997. Like that frustrating day in Tempe, they were not happy about the calls in Green Bay. "It was ridiculous," said free safety Brian Dawkins, who was flagged for defensive holding when, he said, he was nowhere near the play.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / PAOLA NOGUERAS
Plenty of red, white and blue decorated the streets of Yeadon on Saturday as residents celebrated Flag Day with a parade, games and fireworks. Yeadon was the home of William T. Kerr, the founder of Flag Day, which was first celebrated in 1916, and for residents, Flag Day has the same significance as Independence Day. The actual holiday was yesterday, but the celebration traditionally is held on the Saturday before the holiday. The holiday marks the adoption of the Revolutionary flag by the Continental Congress in 1777.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Under the whir of eight metallic Singer sewing machines, Kathy Keeley meticulously put needle to nylon and began to stitch a 50th one-foot-wide star on the blue fabric. Though she spends almost 60 hours a week at the Humphrys Flag Co. factory in Pottstown, Montgomery County, Keeley finds the work still piling up for herself and a dozen other seamstresses. At Humphrys, a Philadelphia-based manufacturer that sends custom flags all over the world, orders of American flags are on the rise.
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NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next time Lorie Surnitsky drives by what she calls her "gateway" to Philadelphia, she'll see two brand-new American flags flying high. On Thursday afternoon, just two days before Flag Day, the shameful pair of torn and tattered flags displayed over the 2100 Parkway Apartments was switched out for new ones. The Moore College of Art and Design professor had been trying to get them replaced since February. After her battle was chronicled Thursday in The Inquirer, several offers came her way. When she checked her in-box in the morning, she found an e-mail from U.S. Rep. Robert Brady's office awaiting her. The Democrat from Philadelphia wanted to give her two new flags for the former administration building of the School District of Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorie Surnitsky's husband likes to call her the flag police. She wouldn't go that far. But at 74, she's someone who still takes the time to look up at a flag and remember what it stands for. Two American flags in particular are hurting her sense of national pride. They fly on the 2100 Parkway Apartments on 21st and Winter Streets - a gateway, she says, to the historic city. And they're torn and tattered, barely recognizable, more like tissue paper than the Stars and Stripes.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It takes just a year for sunlight to fade a flag. The dead fade, too, if they're not remembered. And so, with flags in hand, a crew of volunteer firefighters made its way early last Sunday through Medford's three largest cemeteries, honoring the graves of those who once fought the nation's wars and the township's fires. "Is that Willits?" Butch Merefield, a past chief of Union Fire Company, asked his son as the two made their way under gray skies along the south side of Odd Fellows Cemetery.
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
TIM O'CONNOR WAS a merchant mariner pondering a career change when a warning from his prospective mother-in-law - "You're not marrying my daughter if you continue to go to sea!" - made up his mind. "I was ready to quit anyway. I got tired of it," O'Connor said. "An old salt told me, when every port starts to look the same it's time to quit. And that was happening. " So he bought a flag company. He knew a bit about flags from sailing, like which to fly when and how to stitch repairs.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By David Iams and FOR THE INQUIRER
Freeman's, which last spring sold a dozen banners from the Richard Dietrich collection for a total of $784,000, is rallying around the flag again. At its fall Pennsylvania sale on Nov. 14 at the Center City gallery, it will offer a rare Revolutionary War battle flag that has been in the same family for more than 200 years. Given that it is expected to sell for $400,000 to $600,000, Freeman's was eager to announce the sale early — on June 14, Flag Day. The flag was that of the Eighth Virginia Regiment, commanded during the war by Col. Peter Muhlenberg (1746-1807)
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every year, on a holiday set aside to honor the U.S. flag, Old Glory is set on fire. It happens in Flag Day ceremonies organized by veterans, scout troops, and municipal governments. Flames are the ultimate honor, according to the U.S. Code, for flags that are tattered and worn. So on Thursday, at a municipal park in Northampton Township, Bucks County, and in other places across the country, old flags that have faded with time or been whipped by the wind will be retired — placed in a pit and burned.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the pantheon of holidays, Flag Day doesn't usually register much more than a stitch in the fabric of everyday. No sequined parades or beer-drenched cookouts, no fireworks, no gift-giving, and definitely no day off. But this year, when June 14 rolled around, the "flag ladies" at the Defense Logistics Agency in Northeast Philadelphia found themselves, briefly, the focus of media attention on the one day dedicated to their craft. The public relations department of the agency decided it was time to let the public know that for more than 150 years the nation's official flags have been embroidered, sewn, and befringed right here.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Larry Platt, Daily News Editor
COUNCILWOMAN Marian Tasco gave me a call last week. It was the day after she "retired" for a day, thereby pocketing the cool lump sum of $478,057 thanks to the DROP program. She thought our treatment of her windfall was racist; we'd superimposed her face on a seemingly rich lady's body, outside a Prada store and next to a Bentley (right). Register of Wills Ron Donatucci had also gotten a DROP payout, but we hadn't mentioned him. In other words, we went after the black lady and not the white guy. I told her that she'd have a point if our rabidly anti-DROP columnist Stu Bykofsky hadn't already treated Franny Rizzo and Frank DiCicco with the same level of outrage as we were now treating her. Those white males received the same ire we sent her way because, as lawmakers, they ought to be held to higher ethical standards than, say, a row-office holder.
NEWS
August 19, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
A HIGHLIGHT of Marilyn Patsy Wells' life was getting to shake Barack Obama's hand when he made a campaign stop in Vernon Park, in Germantown, in 2008. One reason for the thrill was that Marilyn had been a longtime crusader for civil rights, and a black man running for president was more than she could have dreamed of. And after he was elected, she made sure to attend his inauguration. Marilyn Wells, a real-estate broker, a dedicated churchwoman who worked with the late Rev. Leon H. Sullivan at Zion Baptist Church, and a community and civil-rights activist, died of a heart attack Aug. 10. She was 74 and lived in West Mount Airy.
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
On this date in 1777, the Second Continental Congress, sitting in Philadelphia, adopted the Stars and Stripes as the flag of the new United States of America. The date went unobserved until the 19th Century, and even then it was spotty. In Philadelphia, at the urging of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, then-Schools Superintendent Edward Brooks organized an observance at Independence Square in 1893. "School children were assembled, each carrying a small Flag, and patriotic songs were sung and addresses delivered," according to usflag.org In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation declaring June 14 National Flag Day and Congress made it official in 1949 with an act that President Harry Truman signed into law.
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