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Flagpole

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NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a winding street of handsome homes in lovely Kings Grant, the Broomes' place stands out. It's the neat ranch house with the landscaped lawn - and the 19-foot flagpole out front. This week, the couple added a "FOR SALE" sign. Because their flag caused a flap. Seems this leafy Marlton development has rules that govern flagpoles, fences - even flower beds - which must be approved by a special design committee. "They said we have to take our flag down because of aesthetics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WITH THE BULK of movie stars issuing "I'm so honored" statements following their Oscar nominations or crawling back under the covers following their Oscar snubs, Tattle is forced to travel South today for a follow-up to the item on the ever-patriotic Donald Trump. He who works out his personal issues with an 80-foot flagpole. Well, the latest is that Palm Beach officials have asked a federal court to take over a $25 million suit that Trump filed against the town, claiming it involves a constitutional question.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | By Lauren Mayk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Acme Flag Pole Co. has seen wars before. The flagpole outside the Lingo family business is left over from one. During World War II, Acme was among the businesses prohibited from making nonessential metal products because the government needed raw materials for the war effort. But when President Franklin D. Roosevelt died, workers scrounged the factory for pieces of pipe and constructed a pole to display the flag at half-staff. The pole is still standing outside the factory, where employees and the Lingos are now scrambling to fill orders for new wartime flagpoles.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | By John Murawski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wireless telephone calls are relayed across a network of elevated antennas strategically placed in a grid pattern. But getting those antennas approved by municipal officials is not easy. The antennas tend to be regarded as eyesores, and phone companies often have to hide or camouflage them. It sometimes takes several tries before an antenna is sufficiently obscured. The township Planning Commission recently rejected requests by two telecommunications companies to erect 100-foot "monopoles," one that would have been disguised as a light pole and another that would have been disguised as a flagpole.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | By Mike Capuzzo and Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writers
It is a father's nightmare: He sends his daughter off to school, to a safe place, and then turns on the car radio, tunes in to the news - and suddenly, his daughter's school is no longer safe. There has been a terrible accident. A great, rusted flagpole has fallen in the schoolyard at lunchtime. There is great confusion at the scene. Children are injured; children are dead. Their names are not immediately known. Robert Cairo lived this nightmare on Dec. 7, 1983, when high winds snapped a 75-foot steel flagpole at St. Barnabas School, at 64th Street and Buist Avenue in Southwest Philadelphia, sending it hurtling down on his child.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's that time of year. With special meaning here. Yesterday, two old Army veterans were planting crosses at the flagpole across from the Ferndale Inn. At 9:30 a.m. tomorrow, they will join Nockamixon Township residents and officials in dedicating that sliver of lawn near a magnolia tree as Colman Balogh Memorial Veterans Park. The ground, which honors veterans of all wars, is a gift to the township from Mary Shafer and Shelly Sickbert, who own and live in the house, directly across Route 611 from the flagpole, where Balogh lived until his death in 1999.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The huge American flag, on its 100-foot pole, has flown day and night for years as a landmark for the Freedom Foundation in Valley Forge. But by the dawn's early light yesterday, it was gone, stolen in the night. The 30-by-60-foot, 55-pound flag was one of the largest in the country, said Michael A. Moyer, assistant development officer of the nonprofit foundation. Two locks on the base of the pole were broken, he said. "This flag served as a local landmark to all the people in the area.
NEWS
May 24, 1998 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About four years ago, students at Edgewood Senior High School began raising money to install a flagpole and plaque on the front lawn that would complete the school's memorial to the seven astronauts who died in the 1986 Challenger space shuttle explosion. Students raised about $4,000 and Edgewood Senior principal Michele Ferner agreed to kick in another $4,000 from the student activity fund to complete the project. Work was supposed to be begin last week. But all that changed with the May 12 referendum, in which residents voted, 5,172-4,321, to dissolve Lower Camden County Regional School District, of which Edgewood Senior is a part.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The stone War Memorial opposite the Stewart Armory in Elmwood Park was dedicated in 1922 to honor the veterans who died in World War I. For many years thereafter, it was the site of the borough's Memorial Day observances. But time and neglect took their toll on the stone and the patch of ground upon which it rests. As a result, Memorial Day observances were shifted to the county courthouse, and the site became an eyesore. "It was simply a mess. There were graffiti all along the base of the stone memorial, the ground was overgrown with weeds, the flagpole was rusted, and most of the trees on the park grounds were dead," said Ted Trefsgar, director of veterans affairs for Montgomery County.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the hill country where Pennsylvania, Maryland and West Virginia meet, self-reliance is woven into life's fabric right along with mining and hunting and fishing. So it seemed only natural on Monday night, after the council of Markleysburg, Pa., voted to remove the town flagpole for painting, that the council members would walk out into the twilight and take down the pole. But the 28-foot flagpole slipped, as the assembled townspeople watched, horrified. It toppled into a 7,200-volt overhead power line, electrocuting Borough Council President Robert Friend, Borough Councilman Keith Cuppett and two of Friend's sons.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
On most summer evenings, in the afterglow of a sinking Cape May sun, Vincent Panzano headed for the Cove, the beach at the end of the promenade. There, he took his post at a flagpole that stood for everything he believed in. He switched on a tape player, amped up the sound, and as Kate Smith's "God Bless America" soared, lowered the Stars and Stripes. On hand was an ever-changing passel of children whom he taught to properly fold the flag. The half-hour rite finished, he got into his Ford van with the "JUNE644" tags and drove home to Emerald Avenue, leaving behind an indelible Cape May tableau.
NEWS
June 3, 2012
PHILADELPHIA Homestead exemption Philadelphia homeowners can now apply for a homestead exemption that would provide some relief to those who could be hit hard under Mayor Nutter's plan to move to a new property-tax system based on market values. Homeowners can apply until July 31 for an exemption that would knock off $15,000 or more from their home's value to ease a possible increase in taxes. Applications can be found at phila.gov. Meanwhile, the Legislature is still considering a measure needed to provide a Philadelphia homestead exemption.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WITH THE BULK of movie stars issuing "I'm so honored" statements following their Oscar nominations or crawling back under the covers following their Oscar snubs, Tattle is forced to travel South today for a follow-up to the item on the ever-patriotic Donald Trump. He who works out his personal issues with an 80-foot flagpole. Well, the latest is that Palm Beach officials have asked a federal court to take over a $25 million suit that Trump filed against the town, claiming it involves a constitutional question.
SPORTS
August 3, 2003 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER SPORTS COLUMNIST
The requests are always discreet, as they should be, but they are consistent. The deceased was a lifelong Manchester United fan. He wore red every Saturday for as long as could be remembered and lived and died with the fortunes of his club. Now that he has done the latter, quite literally this time, his family knows that his soul could have no greater joy than if the ashes of his mortal remains were spread upon the hallowed pitch of Old Trafford. Although the team doesn't publicize the practice, lest it find stacks of overnight mortuary packages sent from the far-flung reaches of the burgeoning Manchester United universe, the requests are always honored.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's that time of year. With special meaning here. Yesterday, two old Army veterans were planting crosses at the flagpole across from the Ferndale Inn. At 9:30 a.m. tomorrow, they will join Nockamixon Township residents and officials in dedicating that sliver of lawn near a magnolia tree as Colman Balogh Memorial Veterans Park. The ground, which honors veterans of all wars, is a gift to the township from Mary Shafer and Shelly Sickbert, who own and live in the house, directly across Route 611 from the flagpole, where Balogh lived until his death in 1999.
NEWS
March 22, 2002 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Faced with fierce community opposition, a telecommunication company is holding off on its plan to put cellular antennas in flagpoles it built in a church's backyard. Anthony Ortolani, regional director for Mountain Union Telecom, said yesterday the company is looking for alternate sites. He blamed the township, which he said originally put the company and the East Goshen Bible Church together, for making a "180-degree turn when they got a little heat. " Still, Ortolani said, "We'll try to find something that works for us, and for the township.
NEWS
February 20, 2002 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 22-year-old East Goshen man said yesterday that tearing down flags from poles in the backyard of a church was "an act of protest. " It was "obviously a stupid way to act," Jason Zerbey said. An affidavit of probable cause filed by police says Zerbey was drunk when he tore down the flags. The incident in Chester County has bubbled into a subplot to the dispute over East Goshen Bible Church's decision to erect flagpoles and rent them as cellular phone towers. Zerbey, a part-time West Chester University student was charged with theft, criminal mischief, trespassing and public drunkenness.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | By Lauren Mayk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Acme Flag Pole Co. has seen wars before. The flagpole outside the Lingo family business is left over from one. During World War II, Acme was among the businesses prohibited from making nonessential metal products because the government needed raw materials for the war effort. But when President Franklin D. Roosevelt died, workers scrounged the factory for pieces of pipe and constructed a pole to display the flag at half-staff. The pole is still standing outside the factory, where employees and the Lingos are now scrambling to fill orders for new wartime flagpoles.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Desperate for God" is the theme of See You at the Pole, National Day of Student Prayer, on Wednesday, when students are asked to gather at public and private school flagpoles and pray. The program began in Burleson, Texas, in 1990. In 2000, more than two million students in all 50 states and on six continents took part in the event, according to event organizers. Local churches will hold special worship services this weekend to pray for students and educators. For information, call 817-447-7526 weekdays between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Lecture on Second Coming Anthony Costello, founder of the Evangelical Association for the Promotion of Education, is speaking on "How Seriously Should We Take the Media Hype About the Anti-Christ and the Second Coming?"
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Delaware County church is raising eyebrows in its neighborhood and in the religious community by agreeing to erect an enormous flagpole in its front yard to disguise a cellular-phone tower. From behind the main sign of the Newtown Square Presbyterian Church, an American flag would flap from atop a 120-foot pole at the busy crossroads of Route 252 and Goshen Road. The church has signed a $12,000-a-year lease with VoiceStream Wireless that allows the company to string three or more antennae inside the pole, which would be about three feet in diameter at its base and roughly as high as an 10-story office building.
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