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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
You could argue that there are pros and cons to the free Flaming Lips concert at Penn's Landing on Sunday, part of this weekend's Southern Comfort Music Experience. It seems a little too good to be true, what with a dry day forecast and opening sets from De La Soul and former Husker Du/Sugar singer Bob Mould. (Cowboy Mouth, Ozomatli and others will play Saturday.) Really, does any possible con outweigh this pro? It's a free show, from the Flaming Lips, on a potentially lovely summer's evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2002 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
After this week's endless heat wave, I'm beginning to feel like rock music should only take place in cold, dark places after sundown. However, since tonight's forecast promises a comparatively chilly 70 degrees, the Unlimited Sunshine Tour (6 tonight, Mann Music Center, 52nd and Parkside, 215-878-7707, $17-$36) might be worth it, especially since it's one of the few rock packages that don't try to sell you jeeps, video games, nu-metal or cookie-cutter punk. The Flaming Lips' electronic symphonies to robots and their love of bunny costumes are the main attraction here, as well as baby phat supporters and D.A.I.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the "Music Against Brain Degeneration" tour hits Philadelphia - filled with hi-fi audience headphones, mini-cams, video montage screens, hand puppets and a gong - it places lo-fi icons Sebadoh and IQU, mixologist Cornelius, and wack-pop-pastiche godfather Robyn Hitchcock in the ring with the lovingly layered Flaming Lips and its intense leader, Wayne Coyne. Coyne, found recently in Pittsburgh, is making physical the whole process. "I'm there from the beginning," says Coyne in a hastened, scratchy voice.
LIVING
August 23, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
God bless Wayne Coyne for even trying. The Flaming Lips singer, songwriter and idea man has been constantly pushing himself and his band to reinvent their sound and their methods. And after many, many years spent toiling in the underground, fine-tuning their unique brand of fuzzy acid-rock, the Lips now have a bona fide hit song, "She Don't Use Jelly"; an ambitious concept album, Zaireeka, a four-disc song cycle requiring all four discs to be played simultaneously on four different CD players; and a brand-new masterpiece, the symphonic tour de force The Soft Bulletin (Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
It's difficult to decide which is more surprising: the fact that Steve Burns has made a rock-and-roll record, or the fact that his record is actually good. The original host of Nickelodeon's hit children's show Blue's Clues, Burns easily could have cashed in on his fame as a preschool icon with an album of kids' songs. But the now-30-year-old had other plans. "I've been playing guitar since I was about 14," he says on the phone from New York City. "I was always in bands in high school and college.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
            Scott Thomas: I'm done World cinema is about to lose one of its brightest lights. Kristin Scott Thomas , who is equally at home in English-language pics ( Nowhere Boy ) or French-language ones ( I've Loved You So Long ), has decided to stop making 'em altogether, she tells London's the Guardian in a lengthy interview. Thomas, who has made 65 films, said she's overworked. In September she had a realization. "I just suddenly thought, I cannot cope with another film," says Scott Thomas, "and I just suddenly thought, I can't do it anymore.
NEWS
August 31, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Flaming Lips opened their show Saturday at the Festival Pier at Penn's Landing with a theatrical re-creation of the primal energy of birth. As the projected body of a naked go-go dancer pulsed light from her nether regions, band members emerged from a door in the screen, each taking his place on a stage decorated in construction-cone orange. They laid down an undulating psychedelic groove as singer Wayne Coyne, incongruously clad in a suit coat and unstrung bow tie, appeared in a giant transparent beach ball which he rode out on top of an ecstatic crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011
As it turn out, the biggest musical event in Atlantic City this summer has nothing to do with the casinos (except for providing food and lodging for artists and fans). On June 24, the first of four "Dave Matthews Band Caravan" extravaganzas scheduled this summer across the country kicks off at Bader Field, the historic airport located on Black Horse Pike on the northwest side of town. The three-day musical orgy will see the Matthews Band playing full sets daily. Among the other acts scheduled are Dispatch, Moe., Gogol Bordello, Ray Lamontagne, O.A.R., The Flaming Lips, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Drive-By Truckers, Warren Haynes Band, The Jayhawks and Fitz & The Tantrums.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
It was an easy decision for the anti-establishment types who run Gadfly magazine. When it came to naming the "Band of the Decade" for their current issue, they picked the Flaming Lips. Flaming who? While longtime darlings of the underground (including the cult mags Trouser Press and Maximum Rock and Roll), these Oklahoma rockers have barely been a blip on the commercial scene. In fact, they've seemingly survived by never getting close to the flame, by constantly experimenting and never opting to join a club that would have them as members.
NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
If Dave Matthews was irked by the Flaming Lips' upstaging him at his own festival - the Dave Matthews Band Caravan, which debuted Friday with 14 bands at Bader Field in Atlantic City - the amiable jam-band kingpin sure didn't show it. But then, Matthews, who led the DMB through a two-hour headlining set highlighted by a solo take on Procol Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale," had plenty of other reasons to be pleased. For starters, Bader Field proved to be an ideal venue for the three-day caravan, scheduled to wind up Sunday with a full slate of bands, including Philadelphia acts Amos Lee and Dr. Dog. The orange orb setting over Matthews' left shoulder as he took the stage with "Don't Drink the Water" provided the opening day's picture-postcard moment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
            Scott Thomas: I'm done World cinema is about to lose one of its brightest lights. Kristin Scott Thomas , who is equally at home in English-language pics ( Nowhere Boy ) or French-language ones ( I've Loved You So Long ), has decided to stop making 'em altogether, she tells London's the Guardian in a lengthy interview. Thomas, who has made 65 films, said she's overworked. In September she had a realization. "I just suddenly thought, I cannot cope with another film," says Scott Thomas, "and I just suddenly thought, I can't do it anymore.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In Woody Allen's 1977 film Annie Hall , Alvy Singer, played by Allen, asks sarcastically about a rock concert: "Did it achieve total heaviosity?" As of 2013, Allen could have been asking about Thursday's neo-psychedelia showcase with the Flaming Lips, Tame Impala, and the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger at Festival Pier. The Lips is the noisy soul of heaviosity itself, with a front man - Wayne Coyne - who has become America's huckster of cascading doom-psych, rimmed with trippy hope.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
James Blake Overgrown (Universal ***1/2) British songwriter and electronic musician James Blake won much-deserved acclaim for his 2011 self-titled debut. It mixed dubstep DJ moves and surprising, sensitive songwriter skills into a shadowy and soulful cocktail with plenty of kick. The only trouble was that while Blake's best songs, like "The Wilhelm Scream" delivered startling emotionalism, the Blake tracks that kept calling you back were the ones he didn't write, like Feist's "Limit to Your Love" and the non-album cover of Joni Mitchell's "A Case of You. " On his sophomore Overgrown , Blake doesn't really alter his typically skeletal approach to songwriting, but he effectively refines it. He also rubs elbows with a few illustrious guests, with Wu Tang Clan's RZA rapping on "Take a Fall for Me," and Brian Eno producing "Digital Lion.
NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
If Dave Matthews was irked by the Flaming Lips' upstaging him at his own festival - the Dave Matthews Band Caravan, which debuted Friday with 14 bands at Bader Field in Atlantic City - the amiable jam-band kingpin sure didn't show it. But then, Matthews, who led the DMB through a two-hour headlining set highlighted by a solo take on Procol Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale," had plenty of other reasons to be pleased. For starters, Bader Field proved to be an ideal venue for the three-day caravan, scheduled to wind up Sunday with a full slate of bands, including Philadelphia acts Amos Lee and Dr. Dog. The orange orb setting over Matthews' left shoulder as he took the stage with "Don't Drink the Water" provided the opening day's picture-postcard moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011
As it turn out, the biggest musical event in Atlantic City this summer has nothing to do with the casinos (except for providing food and lodging for artists and fans). On June 24, the first of four "Dave Matthews Band Caravan" extravaganzas scheduled this summer across the country kicks off at Bader Field, the historic airport located on Black Horse Pike on the northwest side of town. The three-day musical orgy will see the Matthews Band playing full sets daily. Among the other acts scheduled are Dispatch, Moe., Gogol Bordello, Ray Lamontagne, O.A.R., The Flaming Lips, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Drive-By Truckers, Warren Haynes Band, The Jayhawks and Fitz & The Tantrums.
NEWS
July 28, 2010
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (3 p.m., NBC10) - Actor Ashton Kutcher; singer Chely Wright; Joseph Vincent performs. The Oprah Winfrey Show (4 p.m., 6ABC) - Susan Boyle performs, discusses how she is handling newfound fame; Adam Lambert performs. The Middle (8:30 p.m., 6ABC) - Frankie (Patricia Heaton) worries about her job when a motivational consultant (guest star Amy Sedaris, Strangers With Candy ) is brought in to whip the sales staff into shape. Paul McCartney: In Performance at the White House (8:30 p.m., WHYY-TV12)
NEWS
August 31, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Flaming Lips opened their show Saturday at the Festival Pier at Penn's Landing with a theatrical re-creation of the primal energy of birth. As the projected body of a naked go-go dancer pulsed light from her nether regions, band members emerged from a door in the screen, each taking his place on a stage decorated in construction-cone orange. They laid down an undulating psychedelic groove as singer Wayne Coyne, incongruously clad in a suit coat and unstrung bow tie, appeared in a giant transparent beach ball which he rode out on top of an ecstatic crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
You could argue that there are pros and cons to the free Flaming Lips concert at Penn's Landing on Sunday, part of this weekend's Southern Comfort Music Experience. It seems a little too good to be true, what with a dry day forecast and opening sets from De La Soul and former Husker Du/Sugar singer Bob Mould. (Cowboy Mouth, Ozomatli and others will play Saturday.) Really, does any possible con outweigh this pro? It's a free show, from the Flaming Lips, on a potentially lovely summer's evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
It's difficult to decide which is more surprising: the fact that Steve Burns has made a rock-and-roll record, or the fact that his record is actually good. The original host of Nickelodeon's hit children's show Blue's Clues, Burns easily could have cashed in on his fame as a preschool icon with an album of kids' songs. But the now-30-year-old had other plans. "I've been playing guitar since I was about 14," he says on the phone from New York City. "I was always in bands in high school and college.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Wayne Coyne doesn't have time to engage in the de rigueur rock-star griping about the problems plaguing the music industry - the evils of file-sharing, the shame of those fast-dwindling sales, the horrors of sex-obsessed teen-pop and other creativity-devoid commercial forms. The singer, guitarist and conceptual leader of Oklahoma City's Flaming Lips is calling from a tour stop in Washington, rattling off a different list, an inventory of the many projects he's in the middle of - among them, a feature-length movie that's past deadline and over budget.
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